Domestic Violence or Intimate Partner Violence

Domestic, or intimate partner violence, can take many forms. It is often violence used in an effort to gain and/or maintain control. Some of the more common types of domestic violence include physical abuse (hitting, pushing, hair-pulling, forced substance use), emotional abuse (insults, blame, or other methods to diminish a person's self-esteem), psychological abuse (threats, including against family, pets, friends, or the abuser themselves, stopping a partner from attending activities, or other manipulation), sexual abuse (coerced or demeaning sex acts), and financial abuse (controlling a partner's finances or restriction of financial resources like an allowance). The emotional effects of these types of abuse can be long lasting, and may cause depression, post-traumatic stress (PTSD), insomnia, emotional distance, and more. If you or someone you know is experiencing (or has experienced) abuse, a qualified therapist can help. It is also important for children who witness or experience domestic abuse to see a professional who specializes in the age group to prevent the trauma affecting adulthood and possibly perpetuating the cycle of abuse. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s abuse specialists for support today. 

Meet the specialists

There are different stages where someone might seek treatment for physical, emotional and/or sexual abuse in one's intimate relationship. Initial stages may be when the survivor is in crisis and just needs safety and stabilization. We would not go into any trauma work at that point. But eventually, as the person has attained physical safety and some distance from this relationship, deeper work can be done to help the person heal long-time wounds and move toward healthier relationships. Additionally, I can refer clients to needed support and shelter resources if necessary.

— Rowena Dodson, Marriage & Family Therapist in Mountain View, CA
 

I specialize in healthy relationships. Having worked in a domestic violence shelter for multiple years, and finding many of my clients have experienced some form of partner violence. I find great passion in assisting clients in understanding what is unhealthy and finding ways to grow and heal into a stronger and healthier person.

— Natalie Coriell, Counselor in Shrewsbury, MO

I have served as an advocate directly for survivors as well as a systems advocate within a community; trained hundreds of professionals and citizens about intimate partner violence/IPV in the workplace/children exposed to IPV; and written journal articles and book chapters regarding women who are not primary aggressors who use force

— Donna Gardner-Jacoby, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Crystal Lake, IL
 

If you've been asking yourself "Am I crazy?" "Why can't I leave?", "Should I go no contact?" or even just "What is going on here?" you aren't alone! I offer a warm, positive and knowledgeable place to sort things out. As a survivor of domestic violence, I am a provider that can provide solid support, understanding and non-judgment. I also have specialized training in intimate partner violence, volunteered at the YWCA to facilitate survivor groups, and worked at the Portland Women's Crisis Line, Womens SAFES Shelter, and Washington County Crisis Team. I understand the difficulties involved in deciding how to manage these painful relationships, and how to heal what keeps you stuck. I also offer support groups so you can hear the perspective of others struggling with similar issues, and know you aren't alone.

— Tiffany Kettermann, Counselor in Portland, OR

Getting hurt by someone you’ve cared for is especially painful. While the physical traumas can be scary as hell, the emotional traumas can take a lot more work to heal. When I work with domestic violence survivors certain themes come up over and over again. Survivors often wonder if something’s wrong with them, why this person hurt them and why they might still care for them. These are complex questions worthy of exploration. Through a multi-modal approach that infuses relational, experiential and body-oriented approaches I help clients overcome trauma, create healthy boundaries, increase resilience, reclaim their sense of self and create the lives they wish to lead.

— Natalia Amari, Clinical Social Worker in Austin, TX

Getting hurt by someone you’ve cared for is especially painful. While the physical traumas can be scary as hell, the emotional traumas can take a lot more work to heal. When I work with domestic violence survivors certain themes come up over and over again. Survivors often wonder if something’s wrong with them, why this person hurt them and why they might still care for them. These are complex questions worthy of exploration. Through a multi-modal approach that infuses relational, experiential and body-oriented approaches I help clients overcome trauma, create healthy boundaries, increase resilience, reclaim their sense of self and create the lives they wish to lead.

— Natalia Amari, Clinical Social Worker in Austin, TX
 

Getting hurt by someone you’ve cared for is especially painful. While the physical traumas can be scary as hell, the emotional traumas can take a lot more work to heal. When I work with domestic violence survivors certain themes come up over and over again. Survivors often wonder if something’s wrong with them, why this person hurt them and why they might still care for them. These are complex questions worthy of exploration. Through a multi-modal approach that infuses relational, experiential and body-oriented approaches I help clients overcome trauma, create healthy boundaries, increase resilience, reclaim their sense of self and create the lives they wish to lead.

— Natalia Amari, Clinical Social Worker in Austin, TX

I have seven years of experience working with survivors of domestic violence, holding specific certifications in working with this population.

— Brittany Male, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in North Aurora, IL
 

Research shows that both men and women can be victims of domestic violence or family violence, and both can be perpetrators as well. I have developed and published a domestic violence documentation format which also serves as an interview guide to thoroughly identify all forms of domestic or family violence. I perform domestic violence evaluations in immigration cases, and I also prepare extreme hardship evaluations in immigration cases. I can provide this service on a nationwide basis.

— Stephen Finstein, Marriage & Family Therapist in Dallas, TX

I have specialized training and certification in treating DV/IPV, and in particular, DV in queer relationships. I ran groups for aggressors for years, and am especially interested in helping people who are ready to let go of manipulating or controlling someone they love.

— Sara Stanizai, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Long Beach, CA
 

I have worked with both men and women for their intimate partner violence issues since 1997.

— Diana Groener, Counselor in Portland, OR

If you've been asking yourself "Am I crazy?" "Why can't I leave?", "Should I go no contact?" or even just "What is going on here?" you aren't alone! I offer a warm, positive and knowledgeable place to sort things out. As a survivor of domestic violence, I am a provider that can provide solid support, understanding and non-judgment. I also have specialized training in intimate partner violence, volunteered at the YWCA to facilitate survivor groups, and worked at the Portland Women's Crisis Line, Womens SAFES Shelter, and Washington County Crisis Team. I understand the difficulties involved in deciding how to manage these painful relationships, and how to heal what keeps you stuck. I also offer support groups so you can hear the perspective of others struggling with similar issues, and know you aren't alone.

— Tiffany Kettermann, Counselor in Portland, OR
 

I have received 80 hours of training on domestic/sexual violence training and response.

— Liberty McClead, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Sharpsburg, GA

DV is not just about physical. Emotional/Verbal abuse sometimes give you deeper wounds. Although I cannot give you legal advice, I'll support your decision. I have seen male victims of DV who express shame and guilt. I'd like to provide safe space for all victims.

— Junko Yamauchi, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Santa Clara, CA