Men's Issues

Studies have shown that women are much more likely than men to seek therapy. However, just like women, men can benefit from having a confidential, private space to explore any issues that might be coming up for them. The term “men’s issues” can refer to any number of concerns men might face, including anger management, addiction, intimacy issues, domestic violence, mid-life crises, grief or loss – in addition to mental health issues like anxiety or depression. If you have found yourself experiencing any of these issues (or others), reach out to one of TherapyDen’s men’s issues specialists today.

Meet the specialists

 

Work closely with male sexual health concerns of both the mind (unwanted attraction, paraphilia, performance anxiety, suppressed desires, etc.) and body (erectile dysfunction, early ejaculation, impotence, etc.). Male survivors of sexual assault are encourages to reach out.

— Peter Bippus, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Beverly Hills, CA

I have experience working with adult men surrounding the issues of addiction/recovery, shame/guilt, life transitions, identity, gender roles, relationship issues, and emotional recognition.

— Angelica Belko, Mental Health Practitioner in Minneapolis, MN
 

Expressing tenderness and being emotionally open are important to nurturing healthy relationships with those around you, yet few men feel comfortable doing this. Often, anxiety, depression, anger, impatience, lack of confidence, and life and work stress get in the way. I help and support men in stepping over these hurdles and improving their relationships.

— Ania Scanlan, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Roseville, MN

In my practice I often see people for reasons such as anxiety or depression, and rarely do we find a need for medication. After speaking with them for a period of time, we discover that there is usually some level of discontent with current life circumstances. Most people that come to me for therapy have some level of upset around where they think life should be or the direction life is going. This upset often has contributed to troubles in their relationships with others at home or at work.

— Scott Groves, Licensed Professional Counselor in Oklahoma City, OK

I specialize in helping men and masculine people cultivate emotional resilience, intimacy, and integrity in relationships. While I am not a strict adherent to the gender binary, I believe the experience of people socialized as men in this culture has a unique confluences of gifts and challenges, and I find that men are hungry for spaces to explore and understand themselves without judgment or shame.

— Anthony Rella, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in SEATTLE, WA
 

With the pressures and expectations placed on men to always be strong and not show emotions, it becomes difficult to connect with true feelings in difficult circumstances. I enjoy working with men of all ages to help them work through the thoughts they have about manhood and reconcile it with their reality. In short, helping them to realize that it is okay not to be okay.

— Phillip Riddick, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Norfolk, VA
 

I have worked with men facing every conceivable challenge to self-esteem, including job loss, divorce, difficulties with children, legal challenges, depression, anxiety, attention problems, etc.

— Keith Ablow, Counselor in Newburyport, MA
 

"The times they are-a-changin'" wrote Dylan. The evolving of cultural values is sometimes very jarring to our male psyche's. The information-laden world we navigate now is significantly different than it was as recently as 5 years ago. Men have had to make a lot of adjustments: In our relationships to others, to the roles in raising kids, to just about everything that men had been taught while growing up. I look to explore these changes with you, and process possible solutions.

— Sandy Marsh, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA

As men, we know that life can be hard! Frequently, we are depleted of hope and then filled with regrets. Disappointments and self-doubt plague our thoughts and control our behaviors. We are dazed by people, places, things, and situations we cannot control or change. We also suffer sorrow, injury, and fear, along with being exposed to infidelity, suspicion, and ruminations. Yet, we are not allowed to speak of it because we are "men." I help men get in touch with who they want to be.

— Alan Zupka, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in ORLANDO, FL

It is often challenging to be a man of integrity today. It is even harder if you grew up without a positive male role model, and can feel like you’re making it up as you go along, with plenty of stumbles along the way. Current events such as the #metoo movement make it even more complex and important to look at the things that get in the way of finding balance and pride in one’s masculinity. As as someone who has grappled with these same issues I can provide understanding and safety, and I would be happy to help you find what masculinity means to you.

— Michael MacLafferty, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Oakland, CA

One of the areas of speciality is working with men whom have had difficulty reconciling their views of masculinity with the weight of emotional problems. In this, we work to help the client express emotions more freely to release pain while also discussing what this does to their definition of masculinity.

— Jeremy Cooper, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Richardson, TX
 

Like many men, I spent many years isolated, disconnected, and largely unaware of my own emotions and the effect I had on others around me. Since starting my own journey of growth and healing through personal therapy and men's work with the ManKind Project, I have become more aware of my own shadow, and more aware of the damage we men have inflicted on society. My goal is to walk with other men and guide them toward connection, vulnerability, and healing.

— Gary Moran, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR

Perhaps you have never tried counseling before, or perhaps you have thought it was just for the “weak.” Maybe it has just been years since you were forced to go as a kid or teenager. I believe that counseling can be different. Your decision to enter counseling at this time is for you, for your future, and for your personal growth. I am here to work alongside you to find better solutions to any negative patterns that continue to play out in your life.

— Shannon Gonter, Counselor in Louisville, KY

Work closely with male sexual health concerns of both the mind (unwanted attraction, paraphilia, performance anxiety, suppressed desires, etc.) and body (erectile dysfunction, early ejaculation, impotence, etc.). Male survivors of sexual assault are encourages to reach out.

— Peter Bippus, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Beverly Hills, CA
 

It is often challenging to be a man of integrity today. It is even harder if you grew up without a positive male role model, and can feel like you’re making it up as you go along, with plenty of stumbles along the way. Current events such as the #metoo movement make it even more complex and important to look at the things that get in the way of finding balance and pride in masculinity.

— Michael MacLafferty, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Oakland, CA

As a male therapist, I understand most of the issues that pertain to being a man. Most of my clients are male and include gay, straight, and queer sexual orientations.

— Ian Felton, Licensed Professional Counselor in Minneapolis, MN

Did any of you grow up with rules (either your own or others) about how we are supposed to live and be as men? Well guess what, there are no rules except the ones you create for yourself. Whether your challenge is relationships, career, health, chronic pain, sexual issues, identity issues, communication, or previous abuse, I can help. I have reconciled the challenges in my life and helped others do the same. I know how we move past our limiting issues, and I will help you move past yours.

— Rice Pierce, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Phoenix, AZ
 

Many men are brought up not to recognize their feelings or believe that their feelings are important. As a result, men often have difficulty forming close and meaningful connections to the people in their lives. This lack of connection can also extend to their career and activities. They find themselves wondering whether this is the life they genuinely want - or are they just working to make someone else happy.

— Jacob Brown, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Corte madera, CA