Men's Issues

Studies have shown that women are much more likely than men to seek therapy. However, just like women, men can benefit from having a confidential, private space to explore any issues that might be coming up for them. The term “men’s issues” can refer to any number of concerns men might face, including anger management, addiction, intimacy issues, domestic violence, mid-life crises, grief or loss – in addition to mental health issues like anxiety or depression. If you have found yourself experiencing any of these issues (or others), reach out to one of TherapyDen’s men’s issues specialists today.

Meet the specialists

As a male therapist, I understand most of the issues that pertain to being a man. Most of my clients are male and include gay, straight, and queer sexual orientations.

— Ian Felton, Licensed Professional Counselor in Minneapolis, MN
 

Men are a beleaguered group caught between traditional expectations and social changes that nullify the masculinity and the male role. My decades-long research and treatment experience have made me acutely aware of sex differences in physiology, biology, temperament, and gender differences in roles and expectations. Paradoxically as US culture has become more "functionally oriented" and the genders more masculinized, the male role have been increasingly marginalized.

— Leland van den Daele, Clinical Psychologist in Petaluma, CA

As men, we know that life can be hard! Frequently, we are depleted of hope and then filled with regrets. Disappointments and self-doubt plague our thoughts and control our behaviors. We are dazed by people, places, things, and situations we cannot control or change. We also suffer sorrow, injury, and fear, along with being exposed to infidelity, suspicion, and ruminations. Yet, we are not allowed to speak of it because we are "men." I help men get in touch with who they want to be.

— Alan Zupka, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in ORLANDO, FL
 

Men have a lot to process and have culturally not been presented with the opportunity to process their feelings in a safe environment. I hold space for them and direct them more deeply into the places that are yearning to be heard, felt, and released.

— Michael Viola, Counselor in Portland, OR

I'm a male and a Viet Nam era veteran. I've facilitated prostate cancer support groups and spent over years participating in a mythopoetic mens group.

— Dane Libart, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Oklahoma City, OK
 

Many men are brought up not to recognize their feelings or believe that their feelings are important. As a result, men often have difficulty forming close and meaningful connections to the people in their lives. This lack of connection can also extend to their career and activities. They find themselves wondering whether this is the life they genuinely want - or are they just working to make someone else happy.

— Jacob Brown, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Corte madera, CA

It is often challenging to be a man of integrity today. It is even harder if you grew up without a positive male role model, and can feel like you’re making it up as you go along, with plenty of stumbles along the way. Current events such as the #metoo movement make it even more complex and important to look at the things that get in the way of finding balance and pride in masculinity.

— Michael MacLafferty, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Oakland, CA
 

You want people to know you, the real you, but what are they going to think of those embarrassing parts of your life? It’s terrifying to think about sharing those things with other people, so you just keep those things hidden, stay small, and march along. Imagine fully and confidently owning your identity, your presence, your voice and feeling empowered to pursue your vision of the future. It’s time to step out of secrecy and smallness to stand tall and own the life that is uniquely yours.

— Jesse Kauffman, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Ann Arbor, MI

I work with men in Fatherhood Issues, Marriage Issues Sex and Intimacy. I find that most men want to be the best versions of themself but don't know how to explore their dark side without fear and shame. Most men will hide their vulnerability form everyone (even themselves) yet true streaghtn comes from looking at the parts of ourselves and our patterns that are hard to look at. I encourage all the men I work with to learn how to sand down these ruff parts and become a new refined man.

— Tyler Rich, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Las Vegas, NV

I'm inspired to work with men who are trying to learn how to embody healthy masculinity. This can look so many different ways but I can help give support to process the challenges that arise in our culture around men finding themselves in a healthy, balanced way.

— Chris Guthrey, Psychologist in Berkeley, CA
 

If you’ve learned it isn’t safe or prudent to reveal feelings or if you don’t even want to think about why you feel the way you do, your personal and professional relationships might be suffering. Men who are uncomfortable asking for help will find my office a safe and reassuring place to take that risk. I help men develop a toolbox of strategies to help reduce anger and anxiety in order to develop more effective communication skills.

— Karen Wulfson, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Beverly Hills, CA

It is often challenging to be a man of integrity today. It is even harder if you grew up without a positive male role model, and can feel like you’re making it up as you go along, with plenty of stumbles along the way. Current events such as the #metoo movement make it even more complex and important to look at the things that get in the way of finding balance and pride in one’s masculinity. As as someone who has grappled with these same issues I can provide understanding and safety, and I would be happy to help you find what masculinity means to you.

— Michael MacLafferty, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Oakland, CA
 

I specialize in helping men work through issues around shame, vulnerability, sexuality, communication, competence, and finding a sense of purpose and meaning in life. I bring a long background leading men's circles, retreats, and rites of passage for both adolescent and adult males. To be a male-identified person brings with it a unique set of roles and expectations which are often internalized. I will support you to get to know yourself and make new, more satisfying choices.

— Lucius Wheeler, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Portland, OR

Used to run a Men's group and can focus on emotional issue unique to men.

— Peter Binnings, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Santa Cruz, CA
 

With the pressures and expectations placed on men to always be strong and not show emotions, it becomes difficult to connect with true feelings in difficult circumstances. I enjoy working with men of all ages to help them work through the thoughts they have about manhood and reconcile it with their reality. In short, helping them to realize that it is okay not to be okay.

— Phillip Riddick, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Norfolk, VA

I have worked with men across my clinical training and post-graduate work in addressing various forms of trauma, depression, anxiety, and other concerns specific to men (e.g., fatherhood). I have worked with trans men throughout the transition process.

— Miklos Hargitay, Psychologist in New York, NY
 

Many young boys and even men today struggle with masculinity and often grow into adulthood anxious, confused, depressed, and lonely. Divorce and the absence of fathers and healthy male role models is a real traumatic loss. Men can also avoid developmental changes in their life having great difficulty in adjusting and integrating new experiences. To cope, many battle with anxiety, depression, and addictions of various types.

— David Sachs, Counselor in Roseville, CA
 

Men who are uncomfortable asking for help tend to find my office a safe and reassuring place to take that risk. I help men develop a toolbox of strategies to help reduce anger and anxiety in order to develop more effective communication skills.

— Karen Wulfson, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Beverly Hills, CA

If we were to examine the hearts of the over 150 million men in this country, we would be alarmed by the profound sense of pain, confusion, and disconnection so many of us experience on a daily basis. Unfortunately, the same constraints that create a man’s wounds also keep them deeply hidden. My aim is to help men reconnect with themselves so they can participate in relationships of significant depth.

— Hayden Lindsey, Counselor in Austin, TX
 

Perhaps you have never tried counseling before, or perhaps you have thought it was just for the “weak.” Maybe it has just been years since you were forced to go as a kid or teenager. I believe that counseling can be different. Your decision to enter counseling at this time is for you, for your future, and for your personal growth. I am here to work alongside you to find better solutions to any negative patterns that continue to play out in your life.

— Shannon Gonter, Counselor in Louisville, KY

Men who are uncomfortable asking for help tend to find my office a safe and reassuring place to take that risk. I help men develop a toolbox of strategies to help reduce anger and anxiety in order to develop more effective communication skills.

— Karen Wulfson, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Beverly Hills, CA
 

Men face many unique challenges in the world today. We often receive conflicting messages as adults that are different from the ones we received growing up. the messages we receive growing up are to be strong, protective problem solvers, who should show little to know emotion. But now as adults, we receive the messages that we are also supposed to be emotionally supportive, emotionally vulnerable, and open. These conflicting messages can lead to many problems as we try to go through life.

— Jacob Butler, Counselor in Lawton, OK

Men who are uncomfortable asking for help tend to find my office a safe and reassuring place to take that risk. I help men develop a toolbox of strategies to help reduce anger and anxiety in order to develop more effective communication skills.

— Karen Wulfson, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Beverly Hills, CA
 

I work with men on dating, relationships, and career, focusing on the depression and anxiety that are often underneath day to day problems and holding them back. Society has done a great disservice to men by continuing to spread dangerous messages like "boys don't cry" and "man up". Men are so detached from their feelings that it leads to them living dishonest lives full of shame and guilt and buried emotions that often manifest somatically with panic attacks and GI problems. I can help!

— Marcella Haro, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA

You were told growing up that men don't ask for help. Real men just figure it out on their own. You might feel like a failure because that isn't working. You feel lost because it's very difficult to even start looking for help. Contacting me requires courage. We can explore how much power you really have in your relationships. We can help you discover tools.

— Tom Buffington, Counselor in Seattle, WA
 

Most men are brought up hearing expressions such as "don't cry" and "man up". These implicit messages from family, friends, and culture cause males to create protective and sometimes maladaptive coping mechanisms around their feelings. Ironically, men are taught not to express feelings in their youth and then expected to show emotional intimacy in adult relationships. I help men explore their repressed feelings and express them in a way that invites deeper connections with others.

— Kelly Edwards, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Austin, TX