Men's Issues

Studies have shown that women are much more likely than men to seek therapy. However, just like women, men can benefit from having a confidential, private space to explore any issues that might be coming up for them. The term “men’s issues” can refer to any number of concerns men might face, including anger management, addiction, intimacy issues, domestic violence, mid-life crises, grief or loss – in addition to mental health issues like anxiety or depression. If you have found yourself experiencing any of these issues (or others), reach out to one of TherapyDen’s men’s issues specialists today.

Meet the specialists

Expressing tenderness and being emotionally open are important to nurturing healthy relationships with those around you, yet few men feel comfortable doing this. Often, anxiety, depression, anger, impatience, lack of confidence, and life and work stress get in the way. I help and support men in stepping over these hurdles and improving their relationships.

— Ania Scanlan, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Roseville, MN
 

Many men struggle with bringing into balance emotional capacity/vulnerability with traditional characteristics of manhood. More often than not, one side gets repressed and the other side gets expressed to an unhealthy degree. I help men come home to themselves so that they can show up fully and unconditionally as partners, fathers, sons and citizens.

— Trevor Brown, Therapist in Boulder, CO

"The times they are-a-changin'" wrote Dylan. The evolving of cultural values is sometimes very jarring to our male psyche's. The information-laden world we navigate now is significantly different than it was as recently as 5 years ago. Men have had to make a lot of adjustments: In our relationships to others, to the roles in raising kids, to just about everything that men had been taught while growing up. I look to explore these changes with you, and process possible solutions.

— Sandy Marsh, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA
 

Men's issues is seen as a new field within therapy that deals with how men experience psychological concerns. Areas that we may explore in this area could include: relationship distress, identity, career choice and passion as well as social concerns. I also offer a group that meets twice a month to explore these issues with other men.

— Michael Lamerato, Mental Health Counselor in Huntington Woods, MI

I work with men around issues of sexual identity, challenges with out of control sexual behaviors and sex addiction, libido and performance anxiety issues, and navigating sexual issues in relationships.

— Greg Bodin, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco, CA
 

Although work with all people, Masculinity is an area of specific strength and focus in my work.

— Mike Doogan, Counselor in Portland, OR
 

As men, we know that life can be hard! Frequently, we are depleted of hope and then filled with regrets. Disappointments and self-doubt plague our thoughts and control our behaviors. We are dazed by people, places, things, and situations we cannot control or change. We also suffer sorrow, injury, and fear, along with being exposed to infidelity, suspicion, and ruminations. Yet, we are not allowed to speak of it because we are "men." I help men get in touch with who they want to be.

— Alan Zupka, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in ORLANDO, FL
 

Among other areas of focus, I have devoted study and research to the issues of hyper-mascunity, social norms for boys and men, anger and withdrawal, and relationship dynamics. As a depth psychology specialist, I work with many men in reclaiming their identities from cultural and social structures, including stress and work-related demands.

— Dr. Edward Santana, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco, CA

As a man, you may be used to: Solving your own problems Not asking for help Avoiding talking with others about things that cause you stress and upset Believing that there is something “unmanly” about seeking and participating in counseling Again, you are not alone. There are numerous reasons that boys and men in our culture would choose to suffer in private silence than admit to another person that there is something they cannot fix on their own. In addition, it’s sometimes tough to go to your friends or family for support, or they are simply not helpful. And searching for solutions on the internet and in books has it’s limits (and can be confusing and frustrating, too). Now, you are still struggling and are thinking about seeking the help of someone like me: a men’s counselor. In our culture, there are expectations for men not to be “weak” or “vulnerable” and to hide emotions or be “warriors.” However, it’s a myth that talking about your problems and how you feel about them will somehow, magically, make you less of a man. Not true. Times are changing, and men need to learn critical skills like emotional intelligence, communication skills, stress management and relationship building. That’s where men’s counseling can help.

— Robert Nemerovski. Psy.D., Clinical Psychologist in Kentfield, CA

I work with men to balance their heart (vulnerability) with their strength (personal responsibility). Many men are out of balance one way or the other - typically the latter. Being a modern man does not mean relinquishing our emotional world. Nor does it mean letting go of a strong sense of self, purpose, and drive. I work with men to come home to themselves so that they can show up fully as partners, fathers, sons and citizens.

— Trevor Brown, Therapist in Boulder, CO
 

It is often challenging to be a man of integrity today. It is even harder if you grew up without a positive male role model, and can feel like you’re making it up as you go along, with plenty of stumbles along the way. Current events such as the #metoo movement make it even more complex and important to look at the things that get in the way of finding balance and pride in one’s masculinity. As as someone who has grappled with these same issues I can provide understanding and safety, and I would be happy to help you find what masculinity means to you.

— Michael MacLafferty, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Oakland, CA

Many males are looking at their experiences of being socialized in ways they know well but don't like. Shame about previous sexual encounters, fears of departing from a certain kind of conformity, worries about objectification of their partners and others and insecurity about who they are, can be crushing. I have a background working with clients particularly around their sexual behavior and masculine identities.

— Jennie Merovick, Associate Clinical Social Worker in Oakland, CA

Seeking help is sign of strength. Men have been sold a lie that they need to be stoic and suffer in silence. The truth is that men are at their best when they can share their honest feelings with others. Then the facade of perfection falls away and men can offer their true potential to their friends, family and the world.

— Michael Ceely, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Berkeley, CA

It is often challenging to be a man of integrity today. It is even harder if you grew up without a positive male role model, and can feel like you’re making it up as you go along, with plenty of stumbles along the way. Current events such as the #metoo movement make it even more complex and important to look at the things that get in the way of finding balance and pride in masculinity.

— Michael MacLafferty, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Oakland, CA
 

I have specialized in working with male clients on a variety of issues since 1997.

— Diana Groener, Counselor in Beaverton, OR

Like many men, I spent many years isolated, disconnected, and largely unaware of my own emotions and the effect I had on others around me. Since starting my own journey of growth and healing through personal therapy and men's work with the ManKind Project, I have become more aware of my own shadow, and more aware of the damage we men have inflicted on society. My goal is to walk with other men and guide them toward connection, vulnerability, and healing.

— Gary Moran, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR

Many men are brought up not to recognize their feelings or believe that their feelings are important. As a result, men often have difficulty forming close and meaningful connections to the people in their lives. This lack of connection can also extend to their career and activities. They find themselves wondering whether this is the life they genuinely want - or are they just working to make someone else happy.

— Jacob Brown, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Corte madera, CA
 

I work with a lot of men who struggle. They struggle to feel connected. Often they struggle with feeling and expressing emotions except for anger. Men in our society are taught at a very early age that they need to act and look a certain way. What if you don't agree with that? If you have been shamed or shunned for expressing yourself or expressing emotion you've probably learned to bottle it up. You've learned that anger is the only emotion. I will help you feel connected again.

— Patrick Casale, Counselor in asheville, NC
 

After twenty-five years of experience in business, Peter decided to address a need he saw in the field and provide mental health support to men, their families, and fellow business professionals. He believes there is a gap in this industry that has not been addressed and is confident he is uniquely qualified to address the issues and concerns of men and the business professional population.

— Peter Rivkees, Counselor in Clermont, FL

My speciality is working with men and men's issues, and I've been working with men just like you for over 17 years. I look forward to working with you.

— Jason Fierstein, Counselor for Men, Counselor in Phoenix, AZ
 

Perhaps you have never tried counseling before, or perhaps you have thought it was just for the “weak.” Maybe it has just been years since you were forced to go as a kid or teenager. I believe that counseling can be different. Your decision to enter counseling at this time is for you, for your future, and for your personal growth. I am here to work alongside you to find better solutions to any negative patterns that continue to play out in your life.

— Shannon Gonter, Counselor in Louisville, KY