EcoTherapy

Ecotherapy, sometimes called nature therapy or green therapy, is founded on the idea that being outdoors, in natural environments, can have a positive influence on the body, mood, and behavior. Therapists that specialize in ecotherapy will view issues with the lens of a client's relationship with their environment – and may even hold some sessions outdoors or recommend locations, frequency, and durations of time to spend outdoors. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s ecotherapy experts today.

Meet the specialists

"Ecotherapy" supports you in experiencing a deep and nurturing connection to nature. I believe we can heal relationships with ourself and with others by learning from the environment. A session might include exploring therapeutic goals while walking or sitting in public parks and open spaces. We can also engage in activities and rituals indoors (such as meditation and mindfully observing nature) that support healthy ways of being and healing. Please contact me so we can discuss possibilities!

— Jenna Maxfield, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Denver, CO
 

Ecotherapy is an abbreviation for “ecological psychotherapy.” It is based upon the growing evidence that spending time in nature, or even looking out a window or handling natural objects, is therapeutic. A session could be considered ecotherapy simply by holding our appointment outdoors, yet it could also mean that we’re taking a hike at an off-site location.

— Katy Adams, Psychotherapist in Austin, TX

Ecotherapy aims to connect individuals therapeutically with nature. Walk + Talk sessions are available in order to bring about the mind/body connection in your therapy process, as well as, getting you grounded back with nature.

— Dr. Dana Avey, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Colorado Springs, CO
 

I have worked in ecotherapies since 2007 and have worked extensively in developing nature-based interventions for healing and growth from trauma in Washington State and beyond. Ecotherapies are self-defined but in general, ecotherapies aren't therapies at all, rather, a reconnection or a grounding to who we are as a species.

— Jeremy Grisham, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Everett, WA

Nature is the most crucial element of my self-care, and I have walked beside many clients who have benefited from the integration of ecotherapy (or nature therapy) in our work. Sometimes this means meeting for a walk outside instead of in the office, or sometimes it means bringing elements of nature into the session.

— Dr. April Watts, Counselor in Boise, ID
 

I have worked in ecotherapies since 2007 and have worked extensively in developing nature-based interventions for healing and growth from trauma in Washington State and beyond. Ecotherapies are self-defined but in general, ecotherapies aren't therapies at all, rather, a reconnection or a grounding to who we are as a species.

— Jeremy Grisham, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Everett, WA

Nature heals the soul. My work in nature allows our environment to be a reflection of our experience and highlight the inner strength within you. I provide outdoor ecotherapy sessions which allow you to connect with your 5 senses and explore your situation through a new perspective. Nature has a lot to teach us about change and I often find that experiences in nature empower the confidence within us to emerge. Our work outside provides deep grounding and connection.

— Marissa Brun, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Boulder, CO
 

I believe that nature is therapy and plan to incorporate out of office experiences including mindful and therapeutic walking on wooded trails and by the coast.

— Craig Beeson, Psychologist in Santa Cruz, CA

Ecological grief and distress around the real threat of climate change is highly disregarded in the mental health field but the hopelessness that accompanies this anxiety can impact both our daily decisions and our plans for the future. We can develop negative coping strategies, or those we’re already navigating may become heightened. Heightened stress about the threat of climate change can fuel tension with the people in your life, especially if they don’t hold the same views as yourself.

— Rae Rome, Associate Clinical Social Worker in Seattle, WA
 

I live in an eco-friendly matter and will help you reconnect with nature.

— Dominique Boschetti, Counselor in Houston, TX

In the simplest of terms, ecopsychology is a form of psychotherapy that believes our psyches are not separate from our environment and provides individuals with an opportunity to explore their relationship with nature.

— Jacqueline Metcalfe, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Malibu, CA
 

Ecotherapy (nature-centered therapy) helps us connect to ourselves, our families, communities and environment. The farther removed we are from the earth's natural cycles, the more anxious, stressed and burned out we may feel. Nature is deeply healing and research supports its positive effects in reducing anxiety, improving self-esteem and promoting relaxation. I offer "nature prescriptions" that help you pause, become still and cultivate a sense of calm and ease.

— Maja Nuoffer, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Sherman Oaks, CA

I am still very much deep in learning and always will be in this field. It is important for my clients that they have a general idea of where they come from, what came on the land before them, and what is there now. I want them to have these things in mind when we are out on the land so that they can orient themselves and learn from the rich history, bio-life, and experience that they have during our sessions.

— Ariella Hubbard, Registered Mental Health Counselor Intern in Golden, CO