Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is a chronic and long-lasting anxiety disorder in which a person has uncontrollable, reoccurring thoughts (obsessions) and behaviors (compulsions) that he or she feels driven to do repetitively. People with OCD may have symptoms of obsessions, compulsions, or both. Common activities include things like hand washing, counting of things, and checking to see if a door is locked over and over. Obsessive thoughts might center around thinks like an excessive concern about germs or forbidden sexual or religious thoughts. As opposed to people with “bad habits” or “negative thoughts”, symptoms of OCD can’t be controlled for more than a short period of time and typically interfere with school, work and personal relationships. People with OCD typically spend at least an hour a day on obsessive thoughts or behaviors. OCD is a serious condition and is associated with an increased risk of suicide. If you are suffering from OCD (or think you might be), reach out to one of TherapyDen’s OCD specialists today. 

Meet the specialists

Along with medication, some of my OCD clients choose to do ERP which a type of CBT that helps with not only OCD but other anxiety disorders as well.

— Satu Woodland, Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner in Boise, ID
 

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder is my specialty. I have been seeking as many ways to learn about and treat OCD and the exhausting ways that it works on your fears and uncertainty of living. I have been trained in the best practices for lessening the tricks that OCD can play on your mind.

— Karmen Tuivai, Licensed Clinical Social Worker

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder is my specialty. I have been seeking as many ways to learn about and treat OCD and the exhausting ways that it works on your fears and uncertainty of living. I have been trained in the best practices for lessening the tricks that OCD can play on your mind.

— Karmen Tuivai, Licensed Clinical Social Worker
 

I utilize Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Exposure and Response Prevention. I have over 34 years of treating OCD the correct way. Many therapists will say they treat OCD but will then use the psychodynamic approach. You will not get better using the psychodynamic approach to treat your OCD. Allow me to show you how to feel better from your OCD.

— Laura Bykofsky, LCSW-R, ACSW, CEAP, SAP, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in , FL

OCD affects both adults and children and can be debilitating and time-consuming, affecting multiple aspects of life. The condition can be treated with Serotonin Selective Reuptake Inhibitor (SSRI), Exposure Response Prevention (ERP), or Acceptance Commitment Therapy (ACT).

— Keren Shemesh, Psychologist in Mountain View, CA
 

You may have already discovered that there are not many therapists who really know how to treat OCD. Working with OCD is my passion. I have had extensive training through the International OCD Foundation as well as individual supervision and coaching. I use evidence based treatments and have had good results. We will work as a team to beat your OCD both in the therapy office and in your outside life.

— Stephen Grimes, Psychotherapist in New York, NY

It seems strange to write, "I love OCD." Seriously, though, OCD, body-focused repetitive behaviors (BFRB), health anxiety, intrusive thoughts, and anxiety manifested in the body as physical symptoms, are related areas I've studied formally and informally over the years and I am so passionate about treating them. If you have OCD or know someone who does, you know that the intensity is overwhelming and most folks who suffer from it are terrified of "being crazy." This is my speciality.

— Katie Playfair, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR
 

I received extended training from OCD Specialist, Amanda Petrik-Gardner, LCPC, and continue to receive consultation and supervision in addition to staying up to date on the latest research.

— Jinger Moore, Licensed Professional Counselor in Twinsburg, OH