Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is a chronic and long-lasting anxiety disorder in which a person has uncontrollable, reoccurring thoughts (obsessions) and behaviors (compulsions) that he or she feels driven to do repetitively. People with OCD may have symptoms of obsessions, compulsions, or both. Common activities include things like hand washing, counting of things, and checking to see if a door is locked over and over. Obsessive thoughts might center around thinks like an excessive concern about germs or forbidden sexual or religious thoughts. As opposed to people with “bad habits” or “negative thoughts”, symptoms of OCD can’t be controlled for more than a short period of time and typically interfere with school, work and personal relationships. People with OCD typically spend at least an hour a day on obsessive thoughts or behaviors. OCD is a serious condition and is associated with an increased risk of suicide. If you are suffering from OCD (or think you might be), reach out to one of TherapyDen’s OCD specialists today. 

Meet the specialists

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder is my specialty. I have been seeking as many ways to learn about and treat OCD and the exhausting ways that it works on your fears and uncertainty of living. I have been trained in the best practices for lessening the tricks that OCD can play on your mind.

— Karmen Tuivai, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Provo, UT
 

I utilize Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Exposure and Response Prevention. I have over 34 years of treating OCD the correct way. Many therapists will say they treat OCD but will then use the psychodynamic approach. You will not get better using the psychodynamic approach to treat your OCD. Allow me to show you how to feel better from your OCD.

— Laura Bykofsky, LCSW-R, ACSW, CEAP, SAP, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in , FL

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder is my specialty. I have been seeking as many ways to learn about and treat OCD and the exhausting ways that it works on your fears and uncertainty of living. I have been trained in the best practices for lessening the tricks that OCD can play on your mind.

— Karmen Tuivai, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Provo, UT
 

It seems strange to write, "I love OCD." Seriously, though, OCD, body-focused repetitive behaviors (BFRB), health anxiety, intrusive thoughts, and anxiety manifested in the body as physical symptoms, are related areas I've studied formally and informally over the years and I am so passionate about treating them. If you have OCD or know someone who does, you know that the intensity is overwhelming and most folks who suffer from it are terrified of "being crazy." This is my speciality.

— Katie Playfair, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR

OCD is so difficult to deal with, especially because people often think of it as just being neat or tidy. But it's so hard when these anxiety thoughts become something that we feel like we can't get away from, and the only way we've learned we can deal with it is with some kind of compulsive action in the world. It may be hard to find proper care, but it is possible. I've been trained in CBT and ERP, to help you learn that you can sit with these feelings, without your compulsions.

— Danielle Wayne, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Boise, ID
 

Common themes in OCD include: contamination, unwanted sexual thoughts (forbidden or perverse sexual thoughts or images, sexual impulses about others, sexual obsessions that involve children or incest, obsessions about aggressive sexual behavior towards others), losing control (fear of acting on an impulse to harm oneself, to harm others, horrific images in one’s mind or blurting out obscenities or insults), religion, harm, and perfectionism.

— Theresa Chiu, Social Worker in Bellingham, WA

I have advanced training in Exposure and Response Prevention therapy (E/RP)to help people with OCD. I also use Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT)and other Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) skill building to help people manage OCD thoughts and behaviors and continue to lead a fulfilling rewarding life.

— Jody Dearborn, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Seattle, WA
 

You may have already discovered that there are not many therapists who really know how to treat OCD. Working with OCD is my passion. I have had extensive training through the International OCD Foundation as well as individual supervision and coaching. I use evidence based treatments and have had good results. We will work as a team to beat your OCD both in the therapy office and in your outside life.

— Stephen Grimes, Psychotherapist in New York, NY

What everyone with OCD has in common is an uncomfortable feeling inside combined with a sense that something is not OK, or not done well enough, or long enough, or that they are always in some sort of peril. Classified under Anxiety Disorders, OCD is a syndrome consisting of repetitive, often annoying, behaviors (compulsions) such as hand washing, counting, checking, cleaning, or mental rituals. These behaviors are most often in response to unwanted distressing thoughts (obsessions) that create an uncomfortable internal feeling of tension or pressure. The behaviors are learned actions designed to reduce or prevent this pressure. OCD is related to other anxiety disorders because this pressure or uneasiness feels similar to anxiety.

— Katherine Kilgore, Clinical Psychologist in Folsom, CA
 

It seems strange to write, "I love OCD." Seriously, though, OCD, body-focused repetitive behaviors (BFRB), health anxiety, intrusive thoughts, and anxiety manifested in the body as physical symptoms, are related areas I've studied formally and informally over the years and I am so passionate about treating them. If you have OCD or know someone who does, you know that the intensity is overwhelming and most folks who suffer from it are terrified of "being crazy." This is my speciality.

— Katie Playfair, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR

During her training and education, Kimberley dedicated much of her research to the study of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) for the treatment of Anxiety Disorders, Eating Disorders, and Depression. Her training also heavily emphasized the practice of Mindfulness for the management of anxiety, depression and stress. After licensure, went on to become the Clinical Director of the OCD Center of Los Angeles. Kimberley provided weekly outpatient, intensive outpatient and group services in addition to 2-day Mindfulness Workshops for those with OCD and OCD Spectrum Disorders.

— Kimberley Quinlan, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Calabasas, CA
 

You may have already discovered that there are not many therapists who really know how to treat OCD. Working with OCD is my passion. I have had extensive training through the International OCD Foundation as well as individual supervision and coaching. I use evidence based treatments and have had good results. We will work as a team to beat your OCD both in the therapy office and in your outside life.

— Stephen Grimes, Psychotherapist in New York, NY

OCD is a debilitating mental illness, and yet there is so much hope and healing through treatment. Client that are able to use ERP (exposure response prevention), to tackle the obsessional thinking that leads to compulsive acts. Over coming OCD is possible, and freedom is possible.

— Bethany Juran, Licensed Professional Counselor in Lincolnshire, IL
 

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) with Exposure and Response Prevention (ERP) is the gold standard treatment for OCD (all types). My training in ERP comes from the International OCD Foundation's Behavioral Therapy Training Institute (BTTI). I believe you are never done learning and for that reason peer consultation, IOCDF conferences, and continuing education programs are a part of my professional life to stay current with research and best practices.

— Emily Weems, Clinical Social Worker in Houston, TX

I treat individuals suffering from mild to extreme OCD: Contamination, Harm, Symmetry/Order, and Purely Obsessional. I utilize evidence based treatments such as exposure and response prevention and cognitive behavioral therapy. These techniques I have found to be most helpful in the immediate and long term of a client's treatment. My approach is evidence-based, compassionate, relatable, and nonjudgemental.

— Rennie Volpe, Licensed Professional Counselor in Conshohocken, PA
 

I have completed specialized training for adults and children through the BTTI, Behavioral Therapy Training Institute through the International OCD Foundation. I attend the yearly IOCDF conferences to stay up to date on the most evidenced based treatments for OCD and related disorders.

— Natalie Henry, Clinical Social Worker in Boulder, CO

OCD (and anxiety in general) is a cycle with a rhythm that creates momentum through repetition. Over time, the cycle of OCD can begin to feel more familiar and habitual. At the same time, it can take over someone’s life, leaving them feeling smaller and smaller. When you begin therapy, you’ll learn more about how OCD, anxiety, and fear operates in your life. You’ll also learn how to shift the rhythm and momentum of anxiety into a direction that is more constructive, helpful, and liberating.

— Andrea Millen, Clinical Psychologist in Portland, OR
 

It seems strange to write, "I love OCD." Seriously, though, OCD, body-focused repetitive behaviors (BFRB), health anxiety, intrusive thoughts, and anxiety manifested in the body as physical symptoms, are related areas I've studied formally and informally over the years and I am so passionate about treating them. If you have OCD or know someone who does, you know that the intensity is overwhelming and most folks who suffer from it are terrified of "being crazy." This is my speciality.

— Katie Playfair, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR