Psychoanalytic

Psychoanalytic theory, the theory that guides psychoanalysis, was first developed by Sigmund Freud. Psychoanalysis is a therapeutic treatment method founded in the study of the unconscious mind. Freud believed that people could be cured of any number of mental health issues by making conscious their unconscious thoughts and motivations, which provides insights into the root of the issue. The goal of is to release pent-up or repressed emotions and memories to lead the client to catharsis, or healing. Traditionally, psychoanalysis sessions will occur 4–5 times a week, with clients lying on a couch, and the therapist (or analyst) often sitting just behind and out of sight. The client will express their thoughts, dreams and fantasies, which the analyst will examine to help the client gain powerful insights. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s psychoanalytic experts today.

Meet the specialists

Psychoanalytic treatment influences my approach due to what I perceive be the clinical significance of working with the unconscious or, to steal a phrase, the knowledge we do not know we know which exerts an influence over us.

— Davin Reich, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in BROOKLYN, NY
 

Psychoanalytic psychotherapy derives from psychoanalysis. The idea is an in-depth exploration of your inner world and understanding how it affects the life you're living today in order to get to a place of real resolution. Or more simply: I'm joining you, sometimes to listen and sometimes to guide or question through this journey of exploring your mind and your real self. In a space where you have complete freedom to say what’s running through your head- good or bad, without being judged.

— Yaron M. Peer, LCSW, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in New York, NY

Object relations, client therapist transference, early life memories, healing from the past, dreams, stream of consciousness: there are many aspects to working psychoanalytically. I look forward to talking about them with you.

— Stephanie Hubbard, Psychotherapist in West Hollywood, CA
 

By "psychoanalytic therapy," I mean that my work is influenced by Contemporary Relational Psychoanalysis. Unfortunately, psychoanalysis has picked up somewhat of a negative reputation along the way! While I agree that many psychoanalytic concepts feel dated and don't speak to many of us, there are also many valuable ideas that are very helpful. For example, psychoanalysis has great respect for the idea that our past has an impact on our present and on our future, even though we may not remember the exact details. It also gives us tools for thinking about how our minds take in information and how we make use of it.

— Marla Cass, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco, CA
 

I call myself a psychoanalytic therapist because this kind of therapy draws on the entire lineage of psychology theory but has well adapted to the issues and concerns of our times. Contemporary psychoanalytic scholars and clinicians are actively engaged with issues of race, gender, social and political inequality, and substance use. This approach is less focused on quick-fixes and more focused on lasting change and overall wellbeing. However, solutions arise naturally in the process.

— Josanna MacCracken, Marriage & Family Therapist in Berkeley, CA

I practice psychoanalytically due to what I perceive be the clinical importance of naming and working with the unconscious or, to steal a phrase from a psychoanalytic figure, "that which we don't know we know".

— Davin Reich, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in BROOKLYN, NY
 

I chose psychoanalysis because I think that it is the most profound and complex method by far. Even when the client (also called analysant) arrives with a specific problem, the therapist tries to look at it in the context of the overall personality and subjective experiences of the individual. We try to interpret the unconscious motivations and beliefs that have lead him/her to suffering. We do not put people in a box because every person is unique and his/her problems require a unique solution. We strive to help the analysant discover what is best for him/herself. The wide range of topics discussed in the analytical process makes it extremely suitable for clinically healthy people who do not have a severe mental health problem, yet they feel tense, sad or unsatisfied with certain aspects of their lives. For me, these are the most interesting but also the most complex cases.

— Mila Petkova, Psychoanalyst
 

This is my primary modality, and my training in this area includes dozens of shorter-term classes at San Francisco Center for Psychoanalysis, completion of of their six month case conference, enrollment in their two year Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy Training Program (now in year two), ongoing individual consultation and supervision under a number of prominent therapists and analysts in the psychoanalytic community, including Beth Steinberg, and participation in countless lectures and seminars.

— Kylie Svenson, Associate Clinical Social Worker in San Francisco, CA

This approach looks into how older patterns are getting in the way of your current experience of the world. By working through these early experiences, new options are available for relating to yourself and others in your current life.

— Mary Bruce-Owenby, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA
 

I am a licensed psychoanalyst who is trained to work with individuals through their own unique unconscious material as a path toward healing and wholeness. In order for one to become a psychoanalyst there is a rigorous standard of completing several years of weekly psychoanalysis in addition to psychoanalytic supervision in clinical work. As a psychoanalyst, I have been through my own therapeutic process which gives me a great amount of respect for the vulnerability that patients experience.

— Holly Vollink-Lent, Psychoanalyst in Rochester, NY

I am trained at the MN Psychoanalytic Society and Institute.

— Kaycie Dale, Counselor in Edina, MN
 

All of my clinical training was in psychoanalytic psychotherapy. What does this mean? We learned from thinkers such as Freud, Melanie Klein, and Wilfred Bion among others. All of these thinkers developed brilliant ideas and concepts about early relating and how it imprints on our relationship style and patterns. In therapy, we might be looking at how these elements play out in your relationships and communication with others.

— Marjorie Cohn, Clinical Psychologist

My style is warm & authentic. I take a non-directive stance, meaning that it’s important for me to allow enough space for different aspects of your internal experience to emerge. I will share my thoughts with you, especially when something feels important, but I won’t tell you what you should or shouldn’t do. Our sessions will instead open up a reflective space where we have the freedom & spontaneity to play with different perspectives & think together in ways that feel generative.

— Katie Flach, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Jose, CA
 

I practice psychoanalytically due to what I perceive be the clinical efficacy of working with the unconscious or, to steal a phrase from a psychoanalytic figure, "that which we don't know we know".

— Davin Reich, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in BROOKLYN, NY

I have received over two years of training and supervision in Intersubjectivity Theory, a contemporary psychoanalytic theory.

— Bianca Martinez, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Pasadena, CA
 

This therapy is essentially synonymous with psychodynamic therapy.

— Anna C. Lewis, Clinical Psychologist in San Francisco, CA
 

Psychoanalytic theory influences my approach due to what I perceive be the clinical significance of naming and working with the unconscious.

— Davin Reich, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in BROOKLYN, NY

The Psychoanalytic model is client-centered and focuses on the past experiences of each client. Past experiences often impact current life situations which can hinder productive growth in the here and now. Past experiences such as childhood trauma or family life cycles are addressed to identify behavioral patterns that require change in the clients life.

— Deahdra Chambers, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Biscoe, NC
 

Psychoanalytic treatment influences my approach due to what I perceive be the clinical relevance of working with the unconscious or, to steal a phrase, the knowledge we do not know we know which exerts an influence over us.

— Davin Reich, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in BROOKLYN, NY

This is my primary modality, and my training in this area includes dozens of shorter-term classes at San Francisco Center for Psychoanalysis, completion of of their six month case conference, enrollment in their two year Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy Training Program (now in year two), ongoing individual consultation and supervision under a number of prominent therapists and analysts in the psychoanalytic community, including Beth Steinberg, and participation in countless lectures and seminars.

— Kylie Svenson, Associate Clinical Social Worker in San Francisco, CA

Psychoanalytic theory influences my approach due to what I perceive be the clinical significance of naming and working with the unconscious or, to steal a phrase and put it another way, to work with the knowledge we do not know we know which exerts an influence on us.

— Davin Reich, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in BROOKLYN, NY
 

I'm a certified psychoanalytic psychotherapist.

— Daniel G. Butler, Counselor in San Francisco, CA