Psychoanalytic

Psychoanalytic theory, the theory that guides psychoanalysis, was first developed by Sigmund Freud. Psychoanalysis is a therapeutic treatment method founded in the study of the unconscious mind. Freud believed that people could be cured of any number of mental health issues by making conscious their unconscious thoughts and motivations, which provides insights into the root of the issue. The goal of is to release pent-up or repressed emotions and memories to lead the client to catharsis, or healing. Traditionally, psychoanalysis sessions will occur 4–5 times a week, with clients lying on a couch, and the therapist (or analyst) often sitting just behind and out of sight. The client will express their thoughts, dreams and fantasies, which the analyst will examine to help the client gain powerful insights. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s psychoanalytic experts today.

Meet the specialists

Psychoanalysis is an intense and life changing type of therapy that will help you get a deeper sense of who you are. Psychoanalysis will help you uncover and explore inner conflicts and coping mechanisms that are out of your awareness. This emotional knowledge will help create long- lasting personal transformation. Psychoanalysis requires a commitment of at least three sessions per week for a long term.

— Edgard Francisco Danielsen, Psychoanalyst in New York, NY
 

I am trained in Modern Analysis. I will help you put words to your thoughts, feelings and urges.

— Melissa Barbash, Counselor in Denver, CO

My goal as a therapist is to help make conscious that which is unconscious for you, the patient.

— Sam Naimi, Associate Clinical Social Worker in West Hollywood, CA
 

Why psychodynamic/analytic therapy? The here and now psychotherapy relationship opens a stunning window into past, present, and future; into the deep wisdom of the unconscious; and into a creative flexibility that brings more and more wholesomeness, freedom, intimacy, and flourishing of the soul. I have doctoral and postdoctoral training in various contemporary analytic approaches, and I practice from a liberatory, feminist, relational stance.

— Aleisa Myles, Psychologist in Media, PA

Carefully listening to the conflicts and desires hidden within your story, through which we can establish new ways for you to live and thrive.

— David Brown, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco, CA
 

Psychoanalytic therapy typically looks at the client’s experiences of early childhood, to see if any events have had particular impact on their live, or contributed in some way to current concerns. This form of therapy is considered a long-term choice, and sessions can continue for weeks, months or even years, depending on the depth of the concern being explored.

— Jacqui Hicks, Counselor in Lansing, MI

Psychoanalytic theory influences my approach due to what I perceive be the clinical significance of naming and working with the unconscious or, to steal a phrase and put it another way, to work with the knowledge we do not know we know which exerts an influence on us.

— Davin Reich, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in BROOKLYN, NY
 

Psychoanalytic theory influences my approach due to what I perceive be the clinical significance of naming and working with the unconscious or, to steal a phrase and put it another way, to work with the knowledge we do not know we know which exerts an influence on us.

— Davin Reich, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in BROOKLYN, NY

All of my clinical training was in psychoanalytic psychotherapy. What does this mean? We learned from thinkers such as Freud, Melanie Klein, and Wilfred Bion among others. All of these thinkers developed brilliant ideas and concepts about early relating and how it imprints on our relationship style and patterns. In therapy, we might be looking at how these elements play out in your relationships and communication with others.

— Marjorie Cohn, Clinical Psychologist
 

I have participated in Jungian-style Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis both as a client at the C.J. Jung Institute of San Francisco and as a therapist. The layers, depths, symbolism, dream interpretations, archetypes, and storytelling involved in this modality is endless and fascinating on the individual and collective level. I find that (when appropriate) this approach matches well with PTSD recovery, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, and Attachment Therapy.

— Amanda Ichihashi Jagerman, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Milwaukie, OR

Psychoanalytic theory influences my approach due to what I perceive be the clinical significance of working with the unconscious.

— Davin Reich, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in BROOKLYN, NY
 

Psychoanalytic psychotherapy derives from psychoanalysis. The idea is an in-depth exploration of your inner world and understanding how it affects the life you're living today in order to get to a place of real resolution. Or more simply: I'm joining you, sometimes to listen and sometimes to guide or question through this journey of exploring your mind and your real self. In a space where you have complete freedom to say what’s running through your head- good or bad, without being judged.

— Yaron M. Peer, LCSW, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in New York, NY

Psychoanalytic psychotherapy is at the root of psychodynamic therapy. Looking to help clients bring the unconscious into conscious awareness, it appreciates the impact one's history has on their present symptoms and development as an individual. Psychoanalytic therapy is often longer-term version of psychodynamic therapy that utilizes the nuances of the relationship to inform one's treatment.

— Jeremy Cooper, Licensed Professional Counselor in Richardson, TX