Biofeedback

Biofeedback is a technique used to gain awareness of involuntary physiological functions (such as your heart rate, blood pressure or skin temperature), with a goal of being able to manipulate them at will. The idea behind biofeedback is that if you use the power of your mind and to become aware of what's going on inside your body, you can gain more control over your health. Biofeedback is considered a mind-body technique. Biofeedback therapy will focus on teaching clients how to better control the body’s involuntary responses to facilitate improved health. Sound like something you’d like to try? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s qualified biofeedback therapists today.

Meet the specialists

This is a technique that I have found helpful for individuals with anxiety or related symptoms.

— Alyssa Vander Schaaf, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Golden Valley, MN
 

Biofeedback is a fancy word for describing any object that provides information to you about yourself. So, stepping on a scale is a form of biofeedback. Looking into a mirror is biofeedback. During in-person sessions, I can provide a heart rate variability monitor that can be used as a source of biofeedback and can assist you in learning self-regulation skills. Believe it or not, you can control your heart rate! Sometimes seeing a bit of evidence is all we need to believe in ourselves.

— Anna Hope, Licensed Professional Counselor in Houston, TX

I use a variety of somato-sensory relaxation strategies to help you learn how to control the physical symptoms of your emotions instead of letting the physical sensations of stress and pain overcome you.

— Kelsey Darmochwal, Counselor in Fort Wayne, IN
 

HeartMath is a form of biofeedback. We monitor your heart rate and simultaneously teach you strategies to make your heart rate more consistent. When folks suffer from anxiety, stress, or depression, the heart rate changes. Our autonomic nervous system can work in hyperdrive and we have to begin to teach our body to regulate itself. When our heart rate increases, it tells our brain we are in "fight or flight" mode. I've personally found this modality to be very effective.

— Yvonne DelZenero, Psychologist in Lakewood, CO

I use Neurofeedback and HRV to help my clients be in control of their attention, emotions and energy levels. A lot of therapy is spent teaching clients how to regulate these processes, with Neurofeedbak and HRV people can achieve these goals much faster, which then allows therapy to be more productive. Clients report less reactivity, better focus, less energy and mood ups and downs and better sleep.

— Natalia El-Sheikh, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Castro Valley, CA
 

I am trained and experienced and offer EEG Neurofeedback as another tool to aide the therapy process. My experience using the tool has made me very excited to see the outcomes and how helpful clients are finding it to be. I am experienced using the tool to treat anxiety, depression, and ADHD/ADD and I have found it to be an excellent tool that only enhances and speeds the recovery and growth process. individuals who have struggled with symptoms for many years.

— Linda Stenberg, Counselor in Canby, OR

Biofeedback is sometimes marketed as a magic bullet but it’s just a tool and it’s only one approach. There is extensive research showing that using relaxation skills ( biofeedback as well as other strategies) helps us access our body’s built-in self-regulation tools so we can feel and do better. The bottom line: When we self-regulate better, we’re better at just about everything else.

— Dr. Jenny Evans, Psychologist in Seattle, WA
 

Certified in baud therapy.

— Wendy Mason, Counselor in Dublin, GA
 

Our body is constantly sending signal to itself. These signals are all part of a rhythm that develops which coordinates our heart, breath, mind, and other things like hormones. Like most things the longer something goes on the more of a pattern it develops. The problematic issue is when we are chronically stressed, anxious, angry or depressed we set a pattern for these rhythms that is out of synch. Our system is not in these chronic states because it feels normal. Biofeedback helps to identify this baseline of normal, and then through simple interventions someone can see how easy it is to get your system back in synch--regular practice starts to reset the body to its more natural state and helps us to have clearer thoughts and more emotional control

— Jolene Feeney, Mental Health Counselor in VANCOUVER, WA

I am Board Certified in Neurofeedback and have been practicing it since 2010. I have the capacity to do various types of neurofeedback training, but my primary intervention is Infraslow Fluctation (ISF) Neurofeedback. This type of neurofeedback influences the slowest waves produced by the brain. These brainwaves are instrumental in regulating a multitude of physiological functions, including sleep, emotional regulation and attention networks. This type of training can promote global, lasting changes to the brain.

— Jessica Weimer, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR

Biofeedback is sometimes marketed as a magic bullet but it’s just a tool and it’s only one approach. There is extensive research showing that using relaxation skills ( biofeedback as well as other strategies) helps us access our body’s built-in self-regulation tools so we can feel and do better. The bottom line: When we self-regulate better, we’re better at just about everything else.

— Dr. Jenny Evans, Psychologist in Seattle, WA
 

Manhattan Mental Health Counseling has a resident biofeedback practitioner. Rene Gonzalez specializes in biofeedback therapy.

— Natalie Buchwald, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in New York, NY

HeartMath biofeedback used to build heart rate variability coherence.

— Lori Olson, Counselor in Tallahassee, FL
 

Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback focuses on treating an overactive "fight or flight" system, so that when you feel your anxiety go into overdrive, you have the tools to physiologically bring down your anxiety. You can actually control your heart rhythms! Athletes, musicians, olympians and others utilize these very same techniques to help them achieve peak performance.

— Cassandra Cannon, Clinical Psychologist in San Marcos, CA