Abuse

Abuse can take many forms – it could be verbal, emotional or physical. Even after the abuse has ended, survivors are often left with intense negative feelings. But the good news is, you don’t have to figure it out on your own. If you or someone you know is suffering from abuse of any kind, contact one of our specialists today to get help.

Meet the specialists

 

As a survivor of both childhood & adulthood abuse in many forms, I understand how it impacts your ability to trust, love & live free of shame, guilt & despair. It took me having many anger outbursts at work before I was able to accept the truth & seek help for myself. I will not say it will be easy because i would be lying, but I can say that finally facing it will be worth the pain & hurt once you make it through to the other side.

— Monique LCSW, Clinical Social Worker in Little Rock, AR

My Social Work Master program had over 10 specialize classes and an internship program regarding child abuse. Following my MSW I worked over 6 years in a program that serviced children who were child abuse survivors.

— Jaimi Martin, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in San Diego, CA
 

Because of my experience in schools, family violence shelters, and mental health agencies, I have spent years assisting the survivors of abuse to heal, make decisions about their future, and go on to live more joyful lives.

— Patricia Bennett, Licensed Professional Counselor in Austin, TX

Over a period of 19 years I have worked closely with parents in the child welfare system (or therapeutically) who were separated from their children often due to domestic/intimate partner violence. I have also worked with children/adults/elderly who were survivors of abuse. Many individuals I have worked with over the years are victims of generational abuse. My goal is to support you therapeutically, regain your confidence and develop healthy coping mechanisms.

— Bethanie Milford, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in New York, NY
 

One if my special areas of interest is Narcissist Abuse, and trained under Dr. Ramani, who specializes in the understanding and recovery of people healing from narcissist abuse. I believe that education is key in recovering from a relationship with a narcissist.

— Valerie Marsh, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Wayzata, MN

Childhood abuse is complex and challenging to heal from. It can leave you feeling low self worth, often thinking unkind and harsh things about yourself. It can leave you feeling unable to love and be loved, struggling to find healthy attachments, even as an adult. In therapy, I provide you with unconditional positive regard, with care and support, with a model of how a healthy relationship can be-- so you can experience the emotional repair you need to live your best life.

— Anna McDonald, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco, CA
 

See above regarding my work with trauma.

— Krista Verrastro, Creative Art Therapist in Reisterstown, MD

You hate that because of what someone else did to you, you bear the consequences. You hate that the things that happened continue to bother you and affect your relationships, your health, your life. Whether the abuse was ongoing, or one or two occasions - it can still have a profound effect on you. You might even feel like it defines you. I help people put the past in the past where it belongs so you no longer feel defined by it and feel free.

— Cassandra Cannon, Clinical Psychologist in San Marcos, CA
 

I have been very focused on abuse for many years, especially emotional, mental, and mental abuse. I believe that while, thankfully, physical violence is now coming out of the closet and being talked about, emotional abuse can be harder to identify, and women have trouble seeing it for what it is, and can often deny it, or feel they just need to live with it. Emotional abuse can be very insidious, but many times can be just as damaging as physical abuse. My experience includes working wit

— Dr. Patricia Field, Clinical Psychologist in Los Angeles, CA

I started my education into the impact trauma has on all types of functioning when I started my career in community mental health in 2006. Most of my experience with trauma survivors is related to familial trauma, generational abuse, and helping people "break the cycles" that have often been present for so long. I have presented on Trauma in the Brain at 3 national conferences and completed about 9 months of training in trauma-focused CBT (did not complete certification).

— Cindy Lemberg, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Indian Trail, NC

I have extensive knowledge and professional experience working with victims and perpetrators of abuse, neglect, and domestic violence. I particularly specialize in working with victims of childhood abuse and neglect.

— Evan Wilson, Social Worker in Columbia, MD
 

I have been very focused on abuse for many years, especially emotional, mental, and mental abuse. I believe that while, thankfully, physical violence is now coming out of the closet and being talked about, emotional abuse can be harder to identify, and women have trouble seeing it for what it is, and can often deny it, or feel they just need to live with it. Emotional abuse can be very insidious, but many times can be just as damaging as physical abuse. My experience includes working wit

— Dr. Patricia Field, Clinical Psychologist in Los Angeles, CA

I've worked in the field of abuse for over 26 years. I have seen first hand how complicated and intertwined abuse and failure in adulthood are. Thanks to neurobiology and psychology technique advancement you can unlock all of that history and put it to rest. Make it a memory instead of a problem you face every day and struggle to overcome. Learning to trust yourself and the world is possible. Don't let the past dictate your future. You can take control of it.

— Sonya DeWitt, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Spokane, WA

Most people have heard the saying: "Hurt people, hurt people. While that is true, abusers do have a choice. They can choose to take out their negative feelings on others, or seek help for the hurt they have inside. No one deserves to be abused and it can leave a lifetime of scars. But with therapy the loss of trust, insecurity, and poor self esteem caused by being abused can be addressed. I have 30 years of experience helping people heal from abuse and would be honored to help you.

— Willie Mae Kent, Clinical Social Worker in Vineland, NJ
 

In my trauma-focused work and my communities, I've witnessed and facilitated healing from many forms of abuse and violence, including: neglect, sexual abuse, physical violence, systemic violence, incarceration and torture, emotional abuse, sexual assault, narcissistic abuse, financial abuse, intimate partner violence, bullying, workplace abuse, and the inherent violence of hierarchy.

— Juliet Anderson, Associate Clinical Social Worker in Ridgewood, NY

I have had experience dealing with childhood sexual abuse, having worked in a local CAC and one of their partner agencies.

— W. Shawn Welty, Licensed Professional Counselor in Vernon, NJ
 

teens that have been bullied or harassed, those suffering from narcissist abuse, rape

— Gina Rivera Sokolich, Counselor in Ballwin, MO
 

"Abuse" is an overused word. It does not begin to address the complexity of attachment wounds and lifelong suffering that comes in its wake.

— Eli Hastings, Marriage & Family Therapist in Seattle, WA