Holistic Therapy

A holistic approach to therapy leads with the big picture. Holistic psychotherapy, an integrative treatment method, emphasizes the relationship between the mind, body, and spirit, attempting to understand and address the ways issues in one aspect of a person can manifest in other areas. Therapists who use a holistic approach typically believe that seeing each client as a whole being with interconnected emotions, physical feelings, thoughts and spiritual experiences is fundamental to providing successful care. Holistic therapists will help clients gain a deeper understanding of their whole self, which can build self-awareness and self-acceptance. Holistic Therapy is used to treat a number of issues, including anxiety, depression, stress, trauma and mood regulation.  Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s holistic therapy experts today.

Need help finding the right therapist?
Find Your Match

Meet the specialists

 

I offer holistic care support that is molded to fit your personal needs as an individual. WIth 10 years background in holistic healthcare, I have witnessed and experienced the power of helping individuals from the inside out, working with the person as a whole. Therefore, i identify the importance of acknowledging each aspect of a person and working to hold up the areas that need extra care and attention in order to establish stability, longevity and wellness in their life.

— Amy Galaviz, Licensed Professional Counselor Associate in Vancouver, OR

A holistic approach means seeing a person as a whole being and recognizing the interconnectedness of one’s mind, body, and spirit in defining one’s overall wellness. Holistic balance utilizes a self-inventory of one’s mental (psychological), physical, emotional (i.e. expression of emotions), and spiritual (i.e. values, beliefs, etc.) health to identify imbalances and work towards optimal wellness. Holistic balance emphasizes the belief that all areas of health are of equal importance.

— Shavonne James, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Long Beach, CA
 

Holistic Psychology is a term that was developed to broaden the science to include looking at the whole of human behavior and to consider some “parts” that have been overlooked or deemed as outside the realm of scientific inquiry for Psychology. With Holistic therapy also, Integrative and Functional to resolve addictions, health, mental, and medical conflicts the mind, body, spiritual, and your environmental is used not just limited to theory of psychological studies and assessments.

— JESSICA DAWN RUSSELL, Therapist in Encino, CA

I incorporate metaphysical complementary modalities with clinical therapeutic techniques to achieve healing and wellness. I collaborate with other specialized providers as appropriate to offer a thorough and balanced approach to care.

— Christine Kotlarski, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in ,
 

As an Occupational Therapist, I view people as individuals, not diagnoses. My approach is holistic in that all areas of concern are addressed with you through the lens of what’s affecting your daily function and quality of life. We look for ways to collaboratively solve issues or for ways that you can live alongside these issues in your daily life while still finding quality in your life.

— Vanessa Gorelkin, Occupational Therapist in Scottsdale, AZ

I do believe that we are of mind, body, and spirit. As your counselor, my hope is to work congruently with all parts of self so that wellness is achieved in all areas of life. This might include offering a book suggestion, recommendations for a walk during our session, suggestions for you to include outside body work- like massage, acupuncture, or checking in with your primary doctor; or an invitation for a mindfulness meditation or breath work, in or outside of the office.

— Angie Hernandez-Harris, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Boise, ID
 

I use several different approaches in therapy but they all have one thing in common, they are holistic. This is important in order to experience growth and healing in the mind, emotions and body. Therapy approaches that only focus on part of the person, will only experience part of the healing. I believe it is important to address the entire person because our mind, emotions and body are all connected.

— Julie Holburn, Counselor in Boulder, CO

Our minds and bodies are so connected. We can't separate the two and expect to find healing in just one another. Let's work together in an integrated way so that your whole being can feel good.

— Gianna Rico, Clinical Social Worker in Baltimore, MD
 

I find the holistic approach complimentary in working with life transitions which can be a change in the body, mind, or spirit. My education and experience in hospice and palliative care and specializing with adults and aging have lead me to assess and treat people with a biopsychosocial and spiritual model taking into consideration the entire human being and their life experiences that will guide discovery, transformation and the willingness to thrive.

— Tanya Witman, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Colorado Springs, CO

I offer holistic care support that is molded to fit your personal needs as an individual. WIth 10 years background in holistic healthcare, I have witnessed and experienced the power of helping individuals from the inside out, working with the person as a whole. Therefore, i identify the importance of acknowledging each aspect of a person and working to hold up the areas that need extra care and attention in order to establish stability, longevity and wellness in their life.

— Amy Galaviz, Licensed Professional Counselor Associate in Vancouver, OR
 

In order to feel better, it is important to invite the entire self, lived experiences, and all of the elements of your life into the therapy room because everything is interconnected. My role is to keep things simple and to help you integrate new tools so that your body, mind, and spirit are grounded and at peace.

— heidi hewett, Therapist in Athens, GA

I have used holistic therapy with several clients I serve to examine how different domains of our lives can wear on our mental health. Collaboratively, we will examine relationships, career, family, health, and mental health to create a plan of action to help you create the healthiest environment for yourself.

— Natasha Lamb, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Jacksonville, FL
 

I believe that therapist should be as unique as the person receiving it. Although I have had training in many structured treatments, I firmly believe that there should be flexibility in treating people, and context matters. You do not exist in a vacuum and therefore sometimes you might benefit from integrating multiple therapeutic interventions through the course of your treatment. The most important thing is therapy should be a collaboration between the therapist and client.

— Rebecca Keck, Counselor in Kissimmee, FL

I use several different approaches in therapy but they all have one thing in common, they are holistic. This is important in order to experience growth and healing in the mind, emotions and body. Therapy approaches that only focus on part of the person, will only experience part of the healing. I believe it is important to address the entire person because our mind, emotions and body are all connected.

— Julie Holburn, Counselor in Boulder, CO
 

Holistic therapy is a type of therapy that address the “whole” person. This kind of therapy integrates spiritual, physical, mental, and emotional forms of well-being. Its goal is to help individuals develop a deeper understanding of themselves on all these levels.

— Christina Bonnafoux, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Newport Beach, CA

The mind, body and spirit is an interconnected system that needs to be treated as such. When trauma occurs, damage is done across the system, and treating one part barely scratches the surface. Coming into a state of balance involves learning to regulate our nervous system, trusting our intuition and listening to our feelings and senses, healing inner child wounds, nourishing our soul, and connecting with something greater than ourselves.

— Jessica Eden, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Arvada, CO
 

It is important that we look at you as a whole person as we address your needs in counseling since there may be other factors that contribute to your mental health needs. This may include addressing your mental health, physical health, spiritual health, relationship/social health, career health, and anything else that may play a contributing role in your holistic wellness.

— Karilyn (Kay) Bela, Counselor in Lancaster, PA