Burnout

Burnout is a special type of stress – and it doesn’t just come from working long hours (although that can certainly contribute over time). Burnout can be caused by a variety of factors including a lack of work/life balance, unclear job expectations, a dysfunctional workplace, a lack of support or poor job fit. Those who work in a helping professional are especially at risk. Common symptoms of burnout include depression, cynicism and lethargy. If left unaddressed, burnout can affect your physical health contributing to numerous ailments including insomnia, high cholesterol and heart disease. But the good news is that burnout does not have to be a permanent condition. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s burnout experts to start your journey towards recovery!

Meet the specialists

Burnout sucks! Joking aside, it literally has the power to suck all your energy out of your day and your week. Burnout can be an issue related to your identity being out of alignment and your strengths, passion, purpose, and drive might be out of sync. Burnout could also be related to the people in your life or the thoughts that you have about the world, your work, your community, etc. No matter what, burnout is normal and I can help you overcome it and work on the underlying issues causing it.

— Rick Villarreal, Licensed Professional Counselor in Arvada, CO
 

Burnout related to chronic illness self-management

— Faith Cook, Clinical Psychologist in Black Mountain, NC

Ever feel like everything is just too much? Not getting as much done as you used to? Nothing feels worth it anymore? You may be experiencing burnout. Recognizing what's happening is a critical first step, and then working on balancing work and life--and giving yourself permission to do that--is important. We'll also work on boundary setting and other workplace skills, as well as taking time for yourself: and therapy is that first step.

— Christa Cummins, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern
 

I work with clients who struggle with current burnout, or those already in recovery from burnout. Having experienced burnout myself I know it can be a difficult thing to overcome and feel helpless at times, but healing is possible. I frequently help clients create better self-care routines, set boundaries, maintain or build support systems, and increase coping skills.

— Lacie Rasmussen, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Vancouver, WA

I have led several pieces of training on burnout and work with those who have experienced burnout. My expertise doesn't have particular populations as I have worked with mothers, teachers, and therapists. The main function of burnout tends to be subversive and unknown until it causes difficulty in one's life.

— Matt Coffman, Licensed Professional Counselor
 

Supporting a loved one going through mental health or physical illness can be overwhelming. Caregiver burnout is real, and can happen when the roles you have taken on to support a loved one's recovery has become too much. I have worked with patients and families going through chronic and terminal illnesses, and have seen the pain that caregivers bear to make sure their loved one is all right, ranging from feelings overwhelmed to physical injuries when the physical care becomes to high.

— Sima Kulshreshtha, Counselor in Seattle, WA

Burnout can look like constant frustration, picking fights with your partner, checking out of work or home life, depression symptoms, and dreaming of dropping everything and moving to the beach. I've been there, and it can feel hopeless. And you don't have the energy to figure out what to change to get out of it. I will help you take a step back to figure out what's going on, what your options are, and what you should do so you can feel better and actually like your life.

— Jennifer Branstetter, Clinical Social Worker in METAMORA, IN
 

As a trauma/ loss specialist, as well as having a history as a supervisor of advocates and therapists, I focus on the risk factors and protective/resilience factors for secondary trauma that go with crisis response and humanitarian work. Over the years, I have had the privilege of working with many first responders and crisis workers as they enhance their ability to thrive in all areas of their lives.

— Donna Gardner-Jacoby, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Crystal Lake, IL

When what started out as your true calling ends up feeling like a burden, regaining your sense of passion and purpose may seem impossible. I help my clients identify their stressors (at work and away from it), what they may be contributing to the problem, and what stems from the systems in which they work and live, including the added strains of racism, sexism, ageism, and institutional betrayal, and then take action around these so that they can get back to loving what they do!

— G. Dawn Lawhon, Clinical Psychologist in San Francisco, CA
 

I have worked in case management for many years and am passionate about assisting those in helping professions, such as case managers, outreach workers, home visitors, and educators. Burnout, compassion fatigue, and secondary trauma come with the territory.

— Naomi Painter, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Portland, OR

Ever feel like everything is just too much? Not getting as much done as you used to? Nothing feels worth it anymore? You may be experiencing burnout. Recognizing what's happening is a critical first step, and then working on balancing work and life--and giving yourself permission to do that--is important. We'll also work on boundary setting and other workplace skills, as well as taking time for yourself: and therapy is that first step.

— Christa Cummins, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern
 

Burnout can happen to the best of us, even if we love the very thing that is causing it. Like so many people, I have experienced burnout both in my personal and professional lives. There is still stigma attached to burnout, especially as it relates to motherhood, and we need a safe space to address these concerns. My own experiences have helped me to learn how to effectively move forward from burnout so we can continue being the best version of ourselves.

— Ashley Gobeil, Psychologist in Longwood, FL

Do you ever wonder if you can keep doing this? You've lost the enjoyment and fulfillment you used to get from your work. Balance seems impossible. You are overwhelmed and burning out. I can help you enjoy your passion again. You can be true to yourself and continue helping others!

— Megan Carney, Psychologist in Meridian, ID
 

Burnout is a state of emotional and mental exhaustion caused by excessive and prolonged stress. As the stress continues, you begin to lose the interest and motivation that led you to take on a certain role in the first place. Burnout reduces productivity and saps your energy, leaving you feeling increasingly helpless, hopeless, cynical, and resentful. I have dealt with burnout myself and I have assisted others in "protecting" themselves from burnout to keep doing the things they love.

— Wyn Fox, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Houston, TX

In the heart of Silicon Valley, I have worked with engineers struggling with high expectations, responsibilities, work-life balance ,or meaning of life.

— Junko Yamauchi, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in , CA
 

As a trauma and loss specialist, as well as having a history as a domestic violence victim advocate, I focus on the risk factors and protective/resilience factors for secondary trauma that go with crisis response and humanitarian work. Over the past 20 years, I have had the privilege of working with many first responders and crisis workers as they enhance their ability to thrive in all areas of their lives.

— Donna Gardner-Jacoby, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Crystal Lake, IL

Secondary traumatic stress, compassion fatigue, and burnout are all too common in careers that people deal with others' pain on a daily basis. It is my mission to help people prevent and come back from burnout. I speak to members of the community as well as at professional seminars about understanding and preventing burnout. We are too valuable to let any of us die of suicide because we are burnt out and cannot handle the burden alone.

— Meg Young, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Sarasota, FL
 

You're a hard worker, often juggling multiple responsibilities including a busy career. Sometimes the demands are so much and the pressure feels constant and endless. It feels overwhelming, stressful, and exhausting. I have helped hundreds of burnt out working professionals regain a sense of balance in their lives. I help them discover what they really want and work with them to improve their mood, set healthy boundaries, increase confidence and get back to enjoying their life and their work.

— Sunita Shenoy, Psychologist in SAN FRANCISCO, CA

I have experienced burnout during the course of my life, and understand when there may be a time to begin taking risks. Reinventing yourself is vital. I will help you begin recognizing what is occurring deep inside you, and how you can start living a more balanced life.

— Naomi Lufkin, Licensed Professional Counselor
 

Are you a working professional that needs a supportive ear? Have you been frustrated by that "one" coworker that just gets under your skin? Does you work expose you to trauma? How are you taking care of yourself? Do you have balance? How strong is your foundation? What types of things are you telling yourself when you navigate your day to day? Id like to help make sure that the messages you send yourself are healthy and come up with short and long term goals to get you back on track.

— Elizabeth Armstrong, Counselor in Colorado Springs, CO

Burnout comes about through a combination of overwhelming exhaustion, cynicism and detachment from a job or other responsibility. Burnout can cause us to feel ineffective and unaccomplished, and can make use question the point of what we are doing, often leading to a belief that there is no meaning to our activities. Defeating burnout can best be accomplished through a combination of cognitive behavioral therapy and logo-therapy, which can help foster a sense of meaning and purpose.

— Johnny Mitchell, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Sugar Hill, GA
 

Burnout is a feeling most will not acknowledge. It's a state of emotional, physical and mental exhaustion and can stem from the many pressures in your life.

— Claudia Matos, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Orlando, FL

I have experience working with clients in a wide variety of career fields experiencing burnout.

— Molly Roth, Counselor in Cedar Park, TX
 

Professional burnout - particularly for those in the helping professions.

— Laura Silverman, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Atlanta, GA

As a trauma and loss specialist, as well as having a history as a domestic violence victim advocate, I focus on the risk factors and protective/resilience factors for secondary trauma that go with crisis response and humanitarian work. Over the past 20 years, I have had the privilege of working with many first responders and crisis workers as they enhance their ability to thrive in all areas of their lives.

— Donna Gardner-Jacoby, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Crystal Lake, IL
 

Burnout can creep up and catch us off guard when we are least expecting it. Oftentimes we don't reach out for help until we have become so overwhelmed it feels like everything is hopeless and things in our life have stopped making sense. I have several years experience helping people get back to a healthier state of mind so they can recapture the passion they once had for their work, loved ones, and most importantly, themselves.

— Melanie Taylor, Counselor in Fort Smith, AR

Sacrificing your own needs for others, for too long, can put you on the road to burnout. This is especially prevalent for visionaries, leaders, big-hearted helpers, and social services workers. These roles require self-care and boundaries that can feel selfish and often get neglected. Learn to put parameters around your help, manage vicarious trauma and compassion fatigue, AND stay in alignment with your values to decrease your risk for burnout. Take care of yourself - so you can help others.

— Katie Vernoy, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Torrance, CA
 

Stress at work is something we all experience to some extent, and can be a positive when it helps us stay motivated and get things done. However, too much stress is harmful to our health, putting us under both physical and emotional strain and leading to sickness and depression. Stress and burnout are fast becoming recognised as ‘the modern disease’.

— Agata Pisula, Psychotherapist in London,

Burnout has nothing to do with lack of motivation or laziness. On the contrary, my clients who suffer burnout work extremely hard and with great passion, dedication and commitment at a pace that proves to be unsustainable. The most committed professionals are most vulnerable to burnout. If you are burnt out, I will help you find your way back to balance with compassion and guidance.

— Megan Zesati, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Austin, TX
 

Is the last request just too much? Do you find that you have a shorter and shorter fuse, perhaps leading to an unexpected emotional response? Do you find that something that never used to not bother you at all is now pushing you over the edge? These are a few signs of burnout. Setting boundaries with work, family, or friends is just one of the ways we can find a way back to being your happier and productive self.

— David Shoup, Psychologist