Hakomi

The Hakomi method is a mindfulness-based, body-centered therapeutic approach developed in the 1970s by therapist Ron Kurtz. Evolved from Buddhism and other forms of meditation practice, the Hakomi founded on the principles of nonviolence, gentleness, compassion and mindfulness. The Hakomi method regards people as self-organizing systems, organized around core memories, beliefs and images; this core material expresses itself through habits and attitudes that tend to guide people unconsciously. Hakomi seeks to help people discover and recognize these patterns and then transform their way of being in the world by changing the “core material” that is limiting them. Hakomi can be used to treat a variety of issues, and has been shown to particularly help people who are struggling with anxiety, depression or trauma. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s Hakomi experts today.

Meet the specialists

I am trained in Hakomi Therapy. I will integrate this somatic approach into our work together as needed.

— Melissa Barbash, Counselor in Denver, CO
 

I am a Hakomi inspired therapist. Hakomi is a body centered, present moment modality that moves at the pace of your own healing. It is client led, deep, body based, and a wonderful way to work with historical patterns and trauma. The Hakomi method, as designed by Ron Kurtz, is a therapeutic approach that meets the entire individual. It offers slow change that allows you to integrate what has happened perviously while moving into the future you would like.

— Jenna Noah, Counselor in Denver, CO

Find out more via my speciality webpage on Hakomi and Mindfulness Therapy: https://www.timholtzmantherapy.com/mindfulness-therapy

— Tim Holtzman, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Berkeley, CA
 

The Hakomi method is an elegant model of treatment that respects the mind, body, spirit and eco system of the client. Through thoughtful conversation, an open invitation for honest inquiry and mindful attention to our inner and outer environments we can come into harmony with our life. This is often an excellent approach for the restlessness and anxious inhibition that some of my clients experience.

— Foad Afshar, Psychotherapist in Manchester, NH

I have studied Hakomi method, a mind-body integrative approach that utilizes mindfulness and attachment theory to study and discover the healing inside of you. Hakomi believes in following the process, that you have everything you need inside of you to heal. My main practice is influenced by Hakomi, called Relational Somatic Healing, with similar basic tenets but incorporates craniosacral, mindbody centering and a more relational approach.

— Erica Berman, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Oakland, CA
 

I am trained in Hakomi, a mindfulness-based somatic (body-centered) approach to therapy.

— James Reling, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Portland, OR

Find out more via my speciality webpage on Hakomi and Mindfulness Therapy: https://www.timholtzmantherapy.com/mindfulness-therapy

— Tim Holtzman, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Berkeley, CA
 

Hakomi is a mindful, body-oriented approach to therapy. Using Hakomi, I offer a safe, gentle approach to exploring your relationship to yourself and your experiences. Often we encounter old beliefs that cause suffering. Hakomi supports updating these old limiting ways of thinking to more supportive, compassionate ways of being who you are.

— Melissa Yeary, Counselor in Portland, OR

I have been training in the practice of Hakomi since 2015, and I am currently in the supervision process to become certified as a Hakomi therapist. Hakomi is a mindfulness-based, somatically oriented process of self-study. The Hakomi therapist serves as a facilitator for the client to explore inwardly issues and challenges that show up in the client's life. The practice is experiential and experimental, meaning we don't just talk about issues, we explore together through guided experiments and experiences. The focus is always in the present moment, even when exploring memories and past experiences.

— Jennifer Wohl, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR
 

I am trained in Hakomi Therapy. I will integrate this somatic approach into our work together as needed.

— Melissa Barbash, Counselor in Denver, CO

Hakomi is a body-centered, mindfulness-based approach. Hakomi uses body awareness to access the unconscious. Both trauma and brilliant, creative healing wisdom are stored in the body. By learning how to listen to and follow your body's cues, you will find a depth, ease and aliveness that working in ordinary consciousness can't access.

— Grace Silvia, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Portland, OR
 

I have been training in the practice of Hakomi since 2015, and I am currently in the supervision process to become certified as a Hakomi therapist. Hakomi is a mindfulness-based, somatically oriented process of self-study. The Hakomi therapist serves as a facilitator for the client to explore inwardly issues and challenges that show up in the client's life. The practice is experiential and experimental, meaning we don't just talk about issues, we explore together through guided experiments and experiences. The focus is always in the present moment, even when exploring memories and past experiences.

— Jennifer Wohl, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR

Hakomi is a mindful, body-oriented approach to therapy. Using Hakomi, I offer a safe, gentle approach to exploring your relationship to yourself and your experiences. Often we encounter old beliefs that cause suffering. Hakomi supports updating these old limiting ways of thinking to more supportive, compassionate ways of being who you are.

— Melissa Yeary, Counselor in Portland, OR
 

I use a body centered psychotherapy technique called Hakomi that is aimed at healing core wounding often result from childhood issues. Hakomi is a type of somatic/body-centered therapy that uses a combination of mindful awareness and interpersonal authenticity as a pathway for inner healing. As a client, you will feel safe, seen, and met and learn new depth in inner awareness and acquire tools for more authentic and effective management of your inner world.

— Wendy Yeh, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Palo Alto, CA

I am currently engaged in the Level 2 Hakomi training. I like to try out small experiments in mindfulness to take a look at the thoughts, memories, feelings, and sensations that arise in relation to symptoms or struggles. In Hakomi, we accept these symptoms as sources of valuable information. Mindfulness and compassion for oneself allows old patterns to be seen and updated.

— Paul Abodeely, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Seattle, WA
 

Somatic Psychotherapy is one of the foundational approaches that I use in therapy and I blend Hakomi with EMDR and mindfulness-based practices. I believe that honoring the wisdom of the body gives us incredible insight into the unconscious, and is a highly effective way to heal old traumas and negative belief patterns. I have extensive expertise in mindfulness-based therapy (since 2005) and have been training in Hakomi since 2019.

— Kerry McKee, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Berkeley, CA

I am a Hakomi inspired therapist. Hakomi is a body centered, present moment modality that moves at the pace of your own healing. It is client led, deep, body based, and a wonderful way to work with historical patterns and trauma. The Hakomi method, as designed by Ron Kurtz, is a therapeutic approach that meets the entire individual. It offers slow change that allows you to integrate what has happened perviously while moving into the future you would like.

— Jenna Noah, Counselor in Denver, CO