Couples Counseling

Every couple fights once in a while. It’s a normal, and even healthy, part of most relationships. However, when the frequency and seriousness of your fights start affecting your health and well-being, it may be time to speak with a professional. A therapist specializing in couples counseling is trained to help you and your partner(s) develop tools to better communicate (and fight constructively), help you achieve goals together, or move past a specific event or cause of conflict (such as infidelity, sex, or household duties). In addition to helping those in a relationship have a healthier partnership, couples counseling can also be helpful if you and your partner are considering a breakup or a divorce – having a professional guide you can aide the both of you in making an informed decision. Think it might be time to give couples counseling a try? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s couples counseling experts today.

Meet the specialists

I have completed several Gottman trainings and I am listed on the Gottman Institute website. I have extensive experience in pre-marital counseling, couples counseling , surviving infidelity and counseling couples with ADHD. I work with couples on how to really listen, how to have constructive conflict, how to see each other with compassion and understanding, how to increase connection and intimacy. The best relationships do not happen; they are made though conscious action.

— John Buscher, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Seattle, WA
 

Having an educational background and license in marriage and couple's counseling, I utilize a Gottman perspective ad approach when working with clients.

— Tara Parker, Psychotherapist in Glenview, IL

You want to enjoy each other's company, learn about yourself & grow as individuals. Challenges can easily arise at any stage - how to meet someone, dating, premarital, commitment, re-organizing around Life events, the list goes on. Communication is high on the list of things needed to connect well, but before this, your silent ideas of what you expect or need from one another. In Counseling you step out of the day to day & visit the brass tacks of what your relationship is built on.

— Randi Kofsky, Marriage & Family Therapist in Santa Monica, CA
 

I work with all relationship structures!

— Elyssa Helfer, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist

As human beings, we need relationships to survive. But relationships are also very difficult! Our practice focuses on helping our clients build thriving relationships and increase meaningful connection in their lives. Our co-owners, Paul & Kaitlin Kindman are both Level Two PACT Therapists (Psychobiological Approach to Couple Therapy) who specialize in helping couples to deepen intimacy, security, and contentment in their relationship and repair ruptures and betrayals.

— Kindman & Co. Therapy Practice, Therapist in Los Angeles, CA
 

I stand by the statement, "When couples are in conflict it's rarely about the dishes." I take a broad emotionally focused therapy approach to couples work, and believe healing begins through active listening, identification of one's own feelings and the exploration of life before the relationship.

— Robert Novickas, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA

When couples are in conflict it's rarely about the dishes. I take a broad emotionally focused therapy approach to couples work, and believe healing begins through active listening, identification of one's own feelings and the exploration of life before the relationship.

— Robert Novickas, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA
 

Do you feel like you could use some support to get back to the gratifying part of your relationship? It's hard work being part of a couple. I welcome the opportunity to open the conversation between you and your partner so that hot topics can be navigated with safety, respect and increased insight.

— Tracy Bryce Farmer, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Portland, OR
 

You want to enjoy each other's company, learn about yourself & grow as individuals. Challenges can easily arise at any stage - how to meet someone, dating, premarital, commitment, re-organizing around Life events, the list goes on. Communication is high on the list of things needed to connect well, but before this, your silent ideas of what you expect or need from one another. In Counseling you step out of the day to day & visit the brass tacks of what your relationship is built on.

— Randi Kofsky, Marriage & Family Therapist in Santa Monica, CA

You want to enjoy each other's company, learn about yourself & grow as individuals. Challenges can easily arise at any stage - how to meet someone, dating, premarital, commitment, re-organizing around Life events, etc. Communication is high on the list for connecting well, but before this, your silent ideas of what you expect or need from one another. In Counseling you step out of the day to day & visit the brass tacks of what your relationship is built on.

— Randi Kofsky, Marriage & Family Therapist in Santa Monica, CA
 

Working with couples is some of the most important work that I do. I don't believe that it has to be too late to have people rediscover each other and create the lives that they want to leave. Couples work bridges gender, in that it mainly involves two people who want to make their relationship work, whatever else is going on. Esther Perel has said that couples work often involves making sense of a play which you didn't know you were auditioning for. I can help you find your way.

— Gilbert Bliss, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Towson, MD

An intimate relationship is often where we show the most vulnerable and complicated parts of ourselves, easily leading to a rollercoaster of emotions. Thus, it is also an area that is ripe for personal growth. If you are unfulfilled by the common misguided notion of couples "completing" each other, I am here to help you create a relationship that highlights growth, allowing both parties to develop as individuals. By bringing out the best in ourselves, we can also offer the best to the other.

— I-Ching Grace Hung, Psychologist in San Francisco, CA
 

I enjoy my work with couples a great deal. Oftentimes couples do not realize they are bringing their entire families and family histories into their relationship - whether physically invited there or not. Taking the systemic approach allows for the exploration of how values, beliefs, and practices often collide. I use my conflict resolution skills to coach couples on effective and productive communication so they develop the skills to resolve their own conflict.

— Jacqueline Burnett-Brown, Marriage & Family Therapist

Couples therapy helps us navigate the most complex thing on Earth - the human relationship. We all struggle in relationships from time to time. We fight, we bicker, we threaten, we cheat. Eventually, we need some help. By weaving together attachment theory, neuroscience, mindfulness, and the most effective couples therapy approaches, I help couples fall in love again.

— Chris Tickner, PhD, MFT, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Pasadena, CA
 

You're in a Couple to enjoy one another's company, learn about yourself & grow as individuals. Challenges can easily arise at any stage - how to meet someone, dating, premarital, commitment, re-organizing around Life events, the list goes on... Communication is high on the list of things needed to connect well, but before this your silent ideas of what you expect or need from one another. IN Counseling you step out of the day to day & visit the brass tacks of what your relationship is built on.

— Randi Kofsky, Marriage & Family Therapist in Santa Monica, CA

Couples coming to counseling want to learn how to communicate better with each other. To recognize the cycles that they find themselves falling into. They also want to work on becoming more intimate and connected to their partner. I work with all types of relationships including open relationships, queer relationships, and those wanting to explore new things together.

— Joshua Bogart, Student Therapist in Salem, OR
 

Couple's Counseling is extremely difficult from the therapist's perspective. I have to help two people who have two completely different points of view, about the same situation, find some way to come to an agreement while remaining neutral and empathic to both points of view. I also have to teach you how to do something you have been doing your entire life and only seem to not do it correctly when you're with your person. Long story short, there is a lot of humor involved.

— Derrick Hoard, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in , WA