Couples Counseling

Every couple fights once in a while. It’s a normal, and even healthy, part of most relationships. However, when the frequency and seriousness of your fights start affecting your health and well-being, it may be time to speak with a professional. A therapist specializing in couples counseling is trained to help you and your partner(s) develop tools to better communicate (and fight constructively), help you achieve goals together, or move past a specific event or cause of conflict (such as infidelity, sex, or household duties). In addition to helping those in a relationship have a healthier partnership, couples counseling can also be helpful if you and your partner are considering a breakup or a divorce – having a professional guide you can aide the both of you in making an informed decision. Think it might be time to give couples counseling a try? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s couples counseling experts today.

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Meet the specialists

 

I currently work at a Sex Therapy Group Practice seeing couples with varying sexual orientations, sexual identities, religious practices, and years spent together, experiencing diverse relational issues: communication challenges, sexual dysfunction, desire discrepancy, needs/boundaries, disrupted attachment, contending with mental health diagnoses in the system, and grief/loss.

— Xuan Ho, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist

Things may seem "fine," yet you may be questioning whether your partnership at present is living up to the promise you originally found in it, whether it's helping you live the life you really want. I focus on helping couples with basically solid relationships find deeper joy and connection by helping them attune more deeply to themselves and one another.

— Maria Orr, Marriage & Family Therapist in Corvallis, OR
 

I have completed several Gottman trainings and I am listed on the Gottman Institute website. I have extensive experience in pre-marital counseling, couples counseling , surviving infidelity and counseling couples with ADHD. I work with couples on how to really listen, how to have constructive conflict, how to see each other with compassion and understanding, how to increase connection and intimacy. The best relationships do not happen; they are made though conscious action.

— John Buscher, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Seattle, WA

I have completed an externship and advanced training from Susan Johnson in Emotionally Focused Couples Therapy.

— Susan Cote, Clinical Social Worker in LAKEWOOD RANCH, FL
 

Topics that I tend to assist couples with in couples counseling include: communication, boundaries, trust, betrayal, balancing additional responsibilities and relationships, dealing with transitions, parenting and co-parenting, fair fighting, polyamory and monogamy, building intimacy

— Marcelle Craig, Marriage & Family Therapist

No one leaves childhood unscathed and we bring baggage into our adulthood, into our relationships, and then to the marriage. Couples therapy looks at that baggage, unpacks it, disrupts its dysfunctional movement, and makes a correction for a more joyful relationship. Just as it was before. Let's face it, you chose that person for a reason. What was that reason? Be enlightened and gain self-awareness. The ultimate goal is to enjoy the journey let's do it together!

— MORANT CLINICAL SERVICES GROUP PRACTICE, Marriage & Family Therapist in Long Beach, CA
 

Most communication problems come from the thought that our mate should "know" what we need. News alert no one reads minds! Infidelity typically arises to draw attention to the problems that are festering within the relationship. While it is a very poor and painful choice to address the issues it does not signal the end, instead in can be an opportunity to rebuild a stronger more authentic relationship. Together we will untangle the pain and find solutions.

— Lori Runge, Marriage & Family Therapist in Plano, TX

I help many couples either stay together or peaceful separate. My background is in Marriage and Family therapy, however as a Clinical Counselor and I can help you with your relationship.

— Gregory Custer, Licensed Professional Counselor in Scottsdale, AZ
 

You're in a Couple to enjoy one another's company, learn about yourself & grow as individuals. Challenges can easily arise at any stage - how to meet someone, dating, premarital, commitment, re-organizing around Life events, the list goes on... Communication is high on the list of things needed to connect well, but before this your silent ideas of what you expect or need from one another. IN Counseling you step out of the day to day & visit the brass tacks of what your relationship is built on.

— Randi Kofsky, Marriage & Family Therapist in Santa Monica, CA

Years of experience working with couples using EFT and interpersonal approaches.

— Amanda Walker, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor Associate in Asheville, NC
 

It can be so tough and so scary to start couples work but you are already on the right track by asking for help with things feel hard. Whether you are looking for support in continuing a relationship, healing from an affair, or need support in seperating asking for help and engaging in couples work can be rewarding.

— Annie Buxbaum, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Santa Rosa, CA

John Gottman's research found that emotionally intelligent couples are intimately familiar with each other’s worlds. They know each other’s goals in life, worries, and dreams. Without such a love map, you can’t know your partner. From knowledge springs not only love, but the fortitude to weather marital storms. Couples who have detailed love maps of each other’s worlds are far better prepared to cope with stressful events and conflict.

— Tom Bolls, Licensed Professional Counselor in Austin, TX
 

I utilize a combination of Gottman and the Developmental model for working with couples/relationships. I work with many non monogomous and polyam relationships and utilize my training and lived experience to share resources, challenge stuck patterns, and provide support whether a relationship needs tweaking or is ending.

— Birch Snogles, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in ann arbor, MI

After almost 20 years of working with couples, I have learned that relationships are never simple. Relationships ARE amazingly resilient works of human art. My work has included journeying with couples through affair recovery, adjusting to life after a new baby, premarital counseling and parenting challenges. A strength of mine as a therapist is navigating complexity and holding space for pain, growth and healing.

— Emily Stone, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Austin, TX
 

The goal of couples therapy is to help each partner see and understand the other. Conflict often arises from misunderstanding. Through empathy, behaviors begin to make sense, impasses are resolved, and space becomes available to interact differently with each other. Rather than viewing one's partner as an obstacle, each rediscovers the partnership and support that formed the basis of the relationship and the desire to foster each other's personal growth.

— Mona Kumar, Psychologist in Pasadena, CA

Focusing on specialized training since 2014, and working with couples for over a decade, I aim to help you with a blend of approaches best suited to what you need. My extensive experience tells me couples work can be a complex process of learning how to better communicate and change your interactions from a place of insight and love. I believe it's one of the most transformational forms of healing that supports learning to open your heart even when in pain and empowering yourself to change.

— Natalie Spautz, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Oakland, CA
 

I work with couples through individual and interpersonal challenges that cause strain, stress, confusion, and uncertainty into relationships. Anything from communication skills, to working through infidelity, and coping with stressors in life. The balancing act and dance of couples therapy requires couples to commit to the therapeutic process and be open to the prospect of positive change in their relationship.

— Olamide Margarucci, Psychotherapist

As a Marriage and Family Therapist, I immediately felt very passionate about working with Couples. I have had additional training in the area as well as supervision.

— Kelsey Fitzhugh, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Gilbert, AZ
 

The goal of couples therapy is to help both partners see and understand each other though the development of empathy. Empathy helps couples better understand each other, work through impasses, and feel compassion for one another. The relationship becomes a sanctuary where both individuals feel loved and accepted while continuing to support each other's personal growth.

— Mona Kumar, Psychologist in Pasadena, CA