Couples Counseling

Every couple fights once in a while. It’s a normal, and even healthy, part of most relationships. However, when the frequency and seriousness of your fights start affecting your health and well-being, it may be time to speak with a professional. A therapist specializing in couples counseling is trained to help you and your partner(s) develop tools to better communicate (and fight constructively), help you achieve goals together, or move past a specific event or cause of conflict (such as infidelity, sex, or household duties). In addition to helping those in a relationship have a healthier partnership, couples counseling can also be helpful if you and your partner are considering a breakup or a divorce – having a professional guide you can aide the both of you in making an informed decision. Think it might be time to give couples counseling a try? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s couples counseling experts today.

Meet the specialists

I believe that the key to strong and enduring relationships is the development of a strong sense of self. While the goal for most couples is to create a deep sense of intimacy, developing a strong sense of self is a prerequisite to creating emotional connection. Initially, the primary focus in my work with individuals, couples, and families is the individual growth and differentiation of each person in order to increase a strong sense of self. My work with clients then moves toward increasing their capacity to accept and tolerate differences, a process that must occur prior to increasing the emotional bond. The objective of my work is to facilitate the process of knowing yourself, which includes knowing what you need and want. You are responsible for articulating what you need and want to your partner and/or others from a direct and non-judgmental perspective that includes self awareness and the desire to know yourself and others you are connected to. I facilitate you, your partner, and/or other family members in identifying and communicating your needs and wants to each other.

— Kathy Hardie-Williams, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Tigard, OR

I enjoy working with couples and wrote a book about called Mindful Loving, which is a best seller. I can teach you several methods to have a more peaceful and enjoyable marriage.

— Henry Grayson, Psychologist in New York, NY
 

I have extensive training and experience working with couples. I have a master's degree in marriage and family therapy and I am currently a PhD student in a program that specializes in marriage and family therapy. My dissertation and research focuses on intimate/romantic/sexual relationships

— Amber Ray, Counselor in University Heights, OH

I use the Gottman Method in my work with couples and find it complements my overall theoretical orientation in that it is both relational and research-based. Sessions typically begin with an assessment process that includes a joint session and individual sessions for each partner. During this time I will also have you complete an online assessment. Following this process we will meet to identify your relationship's strengths and areas for growth and to develop a shared plan for change.

— Matthew Malouf, Psychologist in Baltimore, MD
 

I work with couples that have experienced infidelity and want to work on rebuilding their relationship. You don't have to be in the midst of a crisis to seek out help. Couples therapy is helpful for many couples whether dating, living together, or maintaining a long-distance relationship. Some typical issues addressed in couples therapy are infidelity, chronic illness, sex, anger, communication problems, child rearing, finances, substance abuse, and cross-cultural issues.

— Ania Scanlan, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Roseville, MN

As a counselor trained specifically in couples, marriage, and family therapy, I specialize in relationship counseling with all types of couples, including straight, gay, queer, trans, non-binary, poly, and kink. I use a variety of proven modalities with couples to support each unique relationship. Past clients have appreciated my ability to make them feel safe to explore what's really going on.

— Kelly Arthur, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist Intern in Portland, OR
 

I use the Gottman Method in my work with couples and find it complements my overall theoretical orientation in that it is both relational and research-based. Sessions typically begin with an assessment process that includes a joint session and individual sessions for each partner. During this time I will also have you complete an online assessment. Following this process we will meet to identify your relationship's strengths and areas for growth and to develop a shared plan for change.

— Matthew Malouf, Psychologist in Baltimore, MD

For couples, my focus is on using Gottman Style Couples Counseling techniques and Imago Relationship therapy techniques.

— Lydia Blackwell, Counselor in Johnson City, TN

As a licensed marriage and family therapist associate, my education and focus has been on fostering successful relationships between people - whether those are familial, romantic, or sexual. Couples are amazing: building trust, connection, and shared values takes energy! From pre-marital counseling to conflict resolution, I am passionate about this work and the benefits it provides to you, your partner(s), and the community around you.

— Katrina Knizek, Counselor in Spokane, WA
 

Most people start their relationship lives believing that the 3 Ls, love, liking, and lust are all they need to have relationship success. But the Ls’ alone are not enough. Learning to develop deeply mutual relationships, maintaining and celebrating you own identity and the identity of the other, takes work, skill, compassion, and time. People who understand that a healthy relationship is vital to happiness and success, commit to nurturing and maintaining their relationships. That investment

— Michael Johnson, Psychologist in AUSTIN, TX, TX
 

In couples counseling, the relationship is the client. There is no favorite partner, and there are no secrets in the therapeutic dynamic. We discuss the wounds, take ownership for wrongdoings, discuss communication techniques, rebuild trust, and so much more. Humans are complex, and relationships are twice so.

— Rochelle Schwartz, Licensed Professional Counselor in , OR