ADHD

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a brain disorder that is typically characterized by a lack of impulse control, an inability to focus and pay attention, and hyperactivity. ADHD most commonly emerges in children and teens and can continue into adulthood. In fact, ADHD is the most common mental health disorder diagnosed in young people and sufferers often have trouble paying attention in school. ADHD must be diagnosed by a qualified clinician. In addition to medical interventions, seeing a mental health practitioner who specializes in the treatment of ADHD can help patients and their families better cope with many of the symptoms. Contact one of TherapyDen’s ADHD experts today.

Meet the specialists

Problems with attention, impulsiveness, and disorganization can sabotage an otherwise bright and motivated person. ADHD family therapy with me usually involves finding ways to structure the school and home settings to best support the young person. Adult ADHD coaching is similarly focused on work and home with the additional idea of "picking you niche" and best fit. Medication referrals and talking about medication are also common.

— Todd Koser, Psychologist in CHERRY HILL, NJ
 

Problems with attention, impulsiveness, and disorganization can sabotage an otherwise bright and motivated person. ADHD family therapy with me usually involves finding ways to structure the school and home settings.

— Todd Koser, Psychologist in CHERRY HILL, NJ

Expressions of ADHD symptoms are on a spectrum from unnoticeable to threatening livelihoods or causing the end of relationships. The Situations in which these symptoms are expressed are different as well. Situational Therapy for ADHD focuses on providing instruction on how to change situations that lead to procrastination, low-frustration tolerance, and self-loathing. My ADHD clients often know exactly what they need to do in order to make changes. I show them how to do it.

— Derrick Hoard, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in , WA
 

I am not only a practitioner dealing with the affects of ADD/HD but I also have ADD/HD. It means I understand the ramifications both good and bad and understand how it can be used to become successful in life.

— Howard Chusid, Mental Health Counselor in Hallandale, FL

ADHD is simply a genetically inherited deficiency in dopamine and norepinephrine levels. It is one of the more treatable psychiatric conditions out there, but unrecognized and untreated, it can cause myriad challenges. I would know, as I have it myself, and I spend most of my clinical hours helping people hack their ADHD brains to success by maximizing their superpowers while minimizing their superweaknesses.

— Paris Obdan, Psychotherapist in Boulder, CO
 

As a clinician who also has ADD/HD I understand the good and the bad. Many adolescents and adults suffer from the problems associated with ADD/HD because they have never been diagnosed. It can affect marriage, life, personal associations, work and many other areas. It can also serve as a wonderful adjunct to developing new ideas and products. It can be directed, once you understand it's effects.

— Howard Chusid, Mental Health Counselor in Hallandale, FL

I have unique experience working with adults diagnosed with ADHD later in life. I am skilled in targeting interventions to manage ADHD symptomology.

— Ellet Durbin, Counselor in Asheville, NC
 

As a sufferer of Inattentive-Type ADHD myself, I understand that oftentimes feelings of internalized self-judgement and obsolete coping skills can be just as painful as the symptoms of ADHD themselves. And often the stress of accumulated incomplete tasks can snowball into new problems that seem to have a life of their own. I have helped many adults of all ages untangle these knots and gain a greater sense of self-acceptance, forward progression, and calm in their lives.

— Samuel Wilson, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Kensington, MD

I have unique experience working with adults diagnosed with ADHD later in life. I am skilled in targeting interventions to manage ADHD symptomology.

— Ellet Durbin, Counselor in Asheville, NC
 

Many people do not understand the full impact ADHD can have on someone's life. Most of those in my practice have an ADHD diagnosis and or are seeking an evaluation to determine whether they meet criteria. Many children, teens, and adults come for counseling or neurofeedback. We get those with ADHD and know how to help.

— Steffanie Stecker, Counselor in Englewood, CO

I use a variety of tools and strategies to help children with ADHD learn executive functioning, behavior management, and emotion regulation skills.

— Cathy Gilbert, Licensed Professional Counselor Associate
 

Individuals with ADHD have often developed narratives about themselves as "lazy" or "a mess." I help clients with ADHD understand their diagnosis and how their brain-wiring impacts their way of being in the world. I also provide coaching designed to help with the time management and organizational skills necessary to complete specific projects or assignments.

— Cara Spitalewitz, Clinical Psychologist in New York, NY

I offer neuropsychological testing for ADHD and Learning Disorders.

— Dr. Irma Campos, Clinical Psychologist in Tampa, FL
 

Anyone who has struggled with attention or hyperactivity knows that it interferes with so many areas of life whether you’re an adult or child. Learning how to train the brain is essential to managing ADHD and optimal functioning at home, school or work.

— Lanette Barnett, Licensed Professional Counselor in Broken Arrow, OK

Many adults experience difficulties with losing track of things, difficulty being on time, challenges with meeting deadlines or completing projects, and especially with starting projects even when they have been excited about them. Children with ADD/ADHD grow into adults with these symptoms, and this can create a tendency to beat yourself down and develop depression and anxiety, for not being able to track things or do things like other people seem to do. Allow me to help.

— Christi Proffitt, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Seattle, WA
 

I first became deeply interested in serving adults with ADHD in 2002 while working in college mental health. Despite excellent graduate training, I had to teach myself through readings, professional trainings and CHADD conferences (Children & Adults with ADD), and have continued immersing myself ever since. 17 years later, adults with ADD / ADHD are my people, and college students with ADHD have a special place in my heart.

— Dr. Laura Forsyth, Psychologist in Camarillo, CA

Finding techniques to regulate the mind, body, and emotions, fine-tune our focusing skills, exploring ways of releasing excess energy, and calm the body when needed.

— Colleen Brunell, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Austin, TX
 

People often wonder if they "have ADHD." I work to help you develop tools to address disorganization, procrastination, anxiety and paralysis, distractibility and poor concentration, and other issues. We can also explore deeper beliefs about one's core self that manifest in maladaptive behaviors.

— Marie Mercado, Clinical Psychologist in Brooklyn, NY