Grief or Loss

Grief and loss are a part of the human condition. Grief is typically considered to be brought on by the death of a loved one, but can also be triggered by any significant life-altering loss (such as a divorce or the loss of a job). Grief is a natural response to loss, but that doesn’t make it easy to deal with.  Symptoms of grief may include sadness, loneliness, anger, denial, depression and a myriad of other thoughts and feelings.  There is no “normal” amount of time for grief to pass, but if you find that your grief is not improving over time or that it is interfering with your everyday life, you may want to consider seeking professional help. A qualified grief counselor can help you to cope with the physical, emotional, social, spiritual, and cognitive responses to loss. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s grief experts today.

Meet the specialists

Personal loss can often leave us feeling lost, paralyzed or even denying ourselves the right to grieve. Feelings can be complicated and often times, our lives simply don't allow for the time it takes to work through grief. Sometimes even those that are closest to us don't seem to understand why we can't just "get over it". I help clients work through feelings of grief at their pace. I am also certified in Perinatal Loss to help moms who experience loss during any stage of pregnancy.

— Amy Galaviz, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Portland, OR
 

I completed my entire counseling training working within the cancer/chronic illness field and continue to do so. Grief and loss is an essential part of a process and have supported hundreds of people through the grieving process as they lose a loved one or grief the loss of the life that has changed.

— Jill Gray, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in St. Petersburg, FL

Each experience of grief is unique, complex, and personal. As a Certified Grief Counselor I help those grieving identify what they are feeling, make sense of the process, and begin to heal. We will look at ways to maintain connected to what has been lost through memory, reflection, ritual, and expression. Experiencing loss is a normal part of life, but there is a way to grow and use our grief in a positive way. I look forward to helping you do so.

— Kathleen Nelson, Therapist in Ann Arbor, MI

I have experience working with issues related to grief, loss and bereavement. Grief is a normal process and can occur with any loss in life. Sometimes it takes longer to feel able to move forward again without additional help. I am trained in the treatment of complicated or prolonged grief and issues related to feeling stuck and unable to move on after a loss.

— Anna Diamantis, Licensed Professional Counselor in Stamford, CT
 

Are you experiencing the loss of a loved one, goal or dream, or loss of identity? Are you grieving life before Covid? Grief & loss can be overwhelming and complex emotions to navigate alone. Having someone to hold the space for your feelings is supportive and empowering as you move through the process of grief. You are not alone.

— Kerri Heintz, Counselor in Allen, TX
 

Personal loss can often leave us feeling lost, paralyzed or even denying ourselves the right to grieve. Feelings can be complicated and often times, our lives simply don't allow for the time it takes to work through grief, and sometimes even those that are closest to us don't seem to understand why we can't just "get over it". I help clients work through feelings of grief at their pace.

— Amy Galaviz, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Portland, OR

Dr. Talmage specializes in treating painful emotional states including anxiety, depression, and chronic trauma. She also has extensive experience in helping others with grief and bereavement.

— Susan Talmage, Psychologist in Dallas, TX
 

Losing a loved one can be one of the most devastating experiences of your life. The feelings of loneliness and despair can be overwhelming. Through focused work on grief and loss, we can work together to process the intense emotions while helping you move forward without feeling like you have to "just move on."

— Jennifer Hughes, Psychologist in , TX

Loss has crashed down on you. Loss of a loved one, a home, a job, a community you loved, your own cancer diagnosis. Your feelings express themselves in unwanted places. You need to talk, but don’t want to burden those around you. You worry that if you start crying you will never stop. The way you coped in the past isn't working for you anymore. You don't know what to do or where to begin.

— Anna Bradshaw, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Madison, NJ
 

In life, we will experience some form of grief and loss, whether the passing of a loved one, the end of a marriage, or the disappointments of loss of hopes and dreams. I believe support with an empathic, resilient, strengths approach will eventually result in discovering your silver lining and deeper insight into ourselves. I also believe that through therapeutic healing, we can discover and create inner wisdom and a version of spirituality unique to ourselves to carry through into the future.

— Jessica Feinsmith, Counselor in Portland, OR

The grieving process is different for everyone. Our individualized approach to treatment will help you secure the support and education you need to get through this difficult time.

— Tiffany Azzinaro, Clinical Social Worker in Williamsville, NY
 

Every day you are affected by loss and grief. Loss and grief can cause feelings of frustration, sadness, anger, hopelessness, and animosity. Together we create rituals and daily practices to support you in understanding your emotions, ways to honor your grief and loss, as well as, how to let go of what no longer serves you.

— Margaret Bell, Counselor in Denver, CO

Unfortunately, the world doesn't have much sympathy or patience for grief. Grief upsets people. Without meaning to, friends and family can communicate hurtful messages. Instead of helping us mourn our loss, they want us to hurry up and get over it. These messages short-circuit the grieving process, and we end up pushing down the feelings. And rather than speeding the process, it makes it take longer. Grief Counseling creates a safe and supportive space in which you can tell your grief st

— Jacob Brown, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Corte madera, CA
 

Whether you have lost a loved one, a romantic relationship, a job or a pet, it can feel overwhelming to deal with the emotions and thoughts that emerge. I know what it feels like, too. I also know it does get better, and that having help along the way is definitely the best way through. If you are overwhelmed with sadness, having trouble moving forward with your life, feeling angry or guilty about something, or just feeling very alone, I am here for you.

— Dr. Kristen Platt, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Newport Beach, CA

I've volunteered in groups and camps with Hope Hospice to help bereaved kids and families. We've done this at overnight weekend events and through regular recurring meetings in the office. I recognize many other losses in addition to death. And I can often help adults understand how loss impacts everything through the child's eyes.

— Joy Cannon, Counselor in Cedar Park, TX
 

Personal loss can often leave us feeling lost, paralyzed or even denying ourselves the right to grieve. Feelings can be complicated and often times, our lives simply don't allow for the time it takes to work through grief, and sometimes even those that are closest to us don't seem to understand why we can't just "get over it". I help clients work through feelings of grief at their pace. I am also certified in Perinatal Loss to especially help moms who experience loss during pregnancy.

— Amy Galaviz, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Portland, OR

When working with grief, I tend to invite clients to sit with me in whatever they are feeling. Grief turns your world upside down and inside out, you don’t have to navigate through it alone.

— Genevieve Saenz, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Austin, TX
 

Personal loss can often leave us feeling lost, paralyzed or even denying ourselves the right to grieve. Feelings can be complicated and often times, our lives simply don't allow for the time it takes to work through grief, and sometimes even those that are closest to us don't seem to understand why we can't just "get over it". I help clients work through feelings of grief at their pace. I am also certified in Perinatal Loss to especially help moms who experience loss during pregnancy.

— Amy Galaviz, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Portland, OR

When loving together, losing together is unavoidable. I help couples and individuals transform mourning into a deeper experience of love. I can help you create relationships that nourish you in the wake of loss; tackle tough questions related to death and spirituality; deal with a partner's different coping style; prevent traumatic loss from replaying within your important relationships.

— Hayden Lindsey, Counselor in Austin, TX
 

My interest in helping people through grief and loss began during graduate school, during which my father's death brought on a disorienting grief process. This experience was a constructive challenge that clarified my value as an empathic, stabilizing presence for others challenged in their grieving. Since then I have worked with people navigating a diversity of loss experiences. My specialization in existential therapy enhances this work through its focus on death anxiety and meaning-making.

— Dylan Keenberg, Clinical Psychologist in Bellingham, WA

I work a lot on grief and loss in my every day. For a lot of people they have wonderful parents, spouses, and siblings, and other loved ones that people get along with beautifully. However, there is a good chunk of us that don't. Whether we have lost our parents on an emotional level where we feel we can't connect with them anymore, or we have physically lost them in our world and didn't have a good relationship with them while they were living. We will look at how you grieve together!

— Laura Reid, Counselor in Loveland, CO
 

Grief and loss is a normal part of the human experience of life. We all experience loss in our life, whether this is the loss of a relationship, a pet, the longing to go back to an earlier time in life, the sadness of that which we love and enjoy coming to its inevitable end. It can be so hard to make sense of life again and to find meaning within this transition. I have studied and specialized in Meaning-Reconstruction approaches to Grief & Loss and can help you to heal your emotional wound.

— Daniel Parker, Ph.D., Clinical Psychologist in Portland, OR

8 years’ experience working as a bereavement counselor for hospice. Facilitator of a variety of grief support groups: Survivor of Suicide Loss Support group, Adult Grief Support groups, Stepping Stones - a children’s grief support group, and a pet loss support group.

— Colleen Storey, Associate Clinical Social Worker in Vancouver, WA
 

Prior to working with a cancer population, I worked for 4 years in inpatient palliative/gerontology/end of life medicine. I have extensive experience with helping families with goals of care conversations, coping with a loved one actively dying, and general grief counseling support. I have graduate school elective training in this subject and also helped co-facilitate a grief and loss support group for caregivers of cancer patients.

— Jesse Dice, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Charlottetsville, VA

I have worked with countless parents or caregivers who have lost children to cancer, chronic illness, or traumatic accidents.

— Stephanie Borer, Psychotherapist in Decatur, GA
 

When you lost a parent at a young age, grief reappears at different developmental stages. I have experience working with young people who are struggling with unresolved grief around early losses.

— Jennifer Trinkle, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Berkeley, CA

Having grown up during the the AIDS crisis in San Francisco, and then losing my father and many, many other people I cared about during this time, I entered the club of the griever. Thus, I understand what it feels like to lose someone, be it a person or a pet or a way of being. Grief and loss isn't just about death - its about change. And I have made it a specialty in my practice because I honor it as the most important work I do.

— Stephanie McDonald, Therapist in Bellingham, WA
 

Losing someone you love deeply is one of the most challenging and painful experiences in life. It should not be done alone! Bereavement therapy can help you feel like you don't have to carry the heavy burden of loss all by yourself. Together we will make space for your loss and also put together a tool box of skills and techniques to help you navigate the treacherous waters of grief and loss.

— Jennifer Wohl, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR