Kink / Sexual Outsiders

In human sexuality, kinkiness is the use of unconventional sexual practices, concepts or fantasies. Kink plays a positive, healthy role in many people’s sex lives. However, integrating the nuances of kink, fetishes, and power-exchange into a loving, intimate relationship can be a challenge for some couples. Or maybe you want to work on something completely unrelated to your kink? A therapist who is sex-positive and kink-friendly can help you with both in a safe, welcoming and educated environment. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s kink experts today.

Meet the specialists

While therapy is supposed to be a place of acceptance and non-judgement, when it comes to sex some counselors aren't equipped to lovingly work with the kink community. As a kink-aware professional, I have worked with those in the lifestyle and received advanced training and education in the world of kink, fetish, and sex worker culture. Human sexuality is vibrant and varied - your flavor of expression is unique and valued.

— Katrina Knizek, Counselor in Spokane, WA
 

I am kink-aware, friendly, and informed. Many of my clients who have a foot in this subculture often feel judged or are told that being in this subculture is what is wrong with them. I try to provide a soft and open, accepting place for clients to discuss their concerns and assist them in navigating this world in a healthy way.

— Samantha Roth, Social Worker in Baltimore, MD

Have you recently discovered that you have some kink fantasies that you want to explore with your partner(s) but are unsure how to bring it up? I pride myself on giving a space for you an your partner(s) to allow expression of relationship issues & exploration while feeling heard by a neutral party (myself) that affirmatively supports issues in this community while also noting that identifying as being part of this community may not have anything to do with your relationship issues.

— Paige Bond, Registered Marriage and Family Therapist Intern in Longwood, FL
 

Safe, sane, consensual Self advocacy Contracts Navigating the community

— Jennifer Rosselli, Counselor in waltham, MA

I specialize and am competent in working with either people engaged in or issues relating to kink, BDSM and fetish sexualities.

— Jesse Kahn, Sex Therapist in new york, NY
 

I am extremely knowledgeable about kink and power exchange relationships; I have held lectures at both the undergraduate and graduate levels on kink and helping to de-stigmatize it. My particular expertise is around separating shame from kink.

— Evan Wilson-Harris, Social Worker in Columbia, MD

I work with people who enjoy a variety of sexual orientations including those outside the mainstream. You needn't have issues related to your sexuality and pleasures to work with me, but you can feel safe knowing that your 'lifestyle' will be embraced and won't be judged nor hidden in our work together.

— Cyndi Darnell, Sex Therapist in NYC, NY
 

I am familiar with and have been involved in the kink community.

— Heather Bell, Clinical Social Worker in Clackamas, OR

All of our therapists have varying level of experience with different communities and experience within kink and BDSM communities, but all of our therapists have competence and an expertise in working with kink and "sexual outsiders" with individuals and partnerships

— Gender & Sexuality Therapy Center, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in new york, NY
 

Societal expectations around sexuality and relationships often have an impact on us. This is especially true for people who identify as asexual or kinky, or participate in sexual or non-sexual kink. Before being a therapist, I had the privilege to form connections within local and larger kink communities. As a former member of Kink and Poly Aware Chicago Therapists (KPACT), I broadened my knowledge even further through formal clinical training.

— Eric Mills, Counselor in Federal Way, WA

Having explored several kinks personally and professionally, I have experience inside the kink world. While I may not personally have preferences for certain kinks (your kink is not my kink), I respect and appreciate what others' may enjoy. The kink world is a highly charged emotional world, one in which a therapist needs to be sensitive. Personally, I have been more involved in the BDSM world. I am a switch and understand the mindset of a Dom and Sub. I know how to help clients explore these.

— Monte Miller, Psychologist in San Antonio, TX
 

Polyamorous, kinky, swingers, porn professionals and anyone who is seeking an understanding and nonjudgmental support system are welcome and accepted.

— Holly Mackin, Marriage & Family Therapist in MT HOLLY, NC

BDSM and kink is a lifestyle that adds intentional power exchange (PE) into relationships which explore sexual dominance, submission, fetishism, age-play, and other forms of kink. For some, kinky sex is used to 'spice things up' in the bedroom by adding new activities and toys to their sex life, while others use protocols of dominance and submission to structure their PE relationships. Consent and negotiation are at the heart of this lifestyle. Experience with sex work as well.

— Tammy 'Kaia' Bruski, Licensed Professional Counselor in Denver, CO
 

I provide a safe place for people to come in and share who they are.

— Veronica Ulery, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Northwood, NH

I'm not someone who just will tolerate your sexual identity; I have wide-ranging knowledge of BDSM and sex work, strong ties to those communities, and a nuanced perspective on the benefits and pitfalls of those aspects of identity. Ultimately I am not interested in steering you toward or away from any particular way of being, but supporting you in making the best possible decisions for yourself.

— Jessica Gioia, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Alameda, CA
 

Kink, Fetish, BDSM, D/s (including TPE), etc. are all welcome and included in my knowledge base.

— Andrea Bezaire, Psychologist in Ann Arbor, MI

I have done extensive research and trainings in the BDSM & polyamorous/non-monogamous lifestyles. I have also gone through sex therapy and couples counseling trainings to help provide non-judgmental couples therapy. I am very open and comfortable working with kink friendly and sex positive communities as well as those outrside of these populations.

— Karla Kurtz, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Everett, WA

As a sex therapist, I am sex positive and open to working with those who enjoy "non-traditional" experiences of sexual pleasure (and consensual pain). I will do everything in my power to feed your empowerment and starve your shame. The media and dominate culture already does a good job of feeding shame. I guarantee you that whatever you're into, and whatever you experience, you are more "normal" or "healthy" than you might think.

— Emily Graham, Therapist in Denver, CO
 

I identify as a Kink-Aware Counselor and provide a welcoming space for members of the kink/BDSM community. I encourage my clients to be themselves and to talk freely about this aspect of their lives, without judgment.

— Brianna Badenhop, Counselor in COLUMBUS, OH

I live and work in the kink/BDSM community and I have the experience to help clients negotiate particular aspects of their communication and relationships or I can more simply be the therapist that is accepting of clients lifestyle.

— Joe Zarate-Sanderlin, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco, CA
 

BDSM and kink is a lifestyle that adds intentional power exchange (PE) into relationships which explore sexual dominance, submission, fetishism, age-play, and other forms of kink. For some, kinky sex is used to spice things up in the bedroom by adding new activities and toys to their sex life, while others use protocols of dominance and submission to structure their PE relationships. Consent and negotiation are at the heart of this lifestyle. Substantial experience with sex work as well.

— Tammy 'Kaia' Bruski, Licensed Professional Counselor in Denver, CO

I am kink knowledgeable clinician with a special interest in serving the BDSM and leather communities. I am a coalition partner with the National Coalition for Sexual Freedom. I conduct education at various leather conferences throughout the year.

— Nick Fuentes, Licensed Professional Counselor in Atlanta, GA
 

Kink is one of those very tricky topics. Some view it as sexual perversion. Others view it as freeing, but are shamed that they like something. However, Kink as a whole is much more common than you may realize. A recent study found that over 40% of Americans surveyed self identified as having particular kink or fetish. Much like poly, the problem for couples can arise when one expresses curiosity and the other person has some aversion or kinkphobia. If you are curious, I can help.

— Philip Justice, Registered Marriage and Family Therapist Intern in Jacksonville, FL

Having explored several different kinks personally and professionally, I have experience inside the kink world. While I may not personally have preferences for certain kinks (your kink is not my kink), I respect and appreciate what others' may enjoy. The kink world is a highly charged emotional world, one in which a therapist needs to be sensitive.

— Monte Miller, Psychologist in San Antonio, TX
 

I work with sex workers, kinksters and fetishists- anyone who may feel like pieces of their sexuality are looked down on by the our society. Whether we are working together to learn more about your passions, process feelings of shame or seeking support in an unsupportive world I am kink informed and sex worker positive.

— Christy Powell, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Austin, TX