Kink / Sexual Outsiders

In human sexuality, kinkiness is the use of unconventional sexual practices, concepts or fantasies. Kink plays a positive, healthy role in many people’s sex lives. However, integrating the nuances of kink, fetishes, and power-exchange into a loving, intimate relationship can be a challenge for some couples. Or maybe you want to work on something completely unrelated to your kink? A therapist who is sex-positive and kink-friendly can help you with both in a safe, welcoming and educated environment. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s kink experts today.

Meet the specialists

Polyamorous, kinky, swingers, porn professionals and anyone who is seeking an understanding and nonjudgmental support system are welcome and accepted.

— Holly Mackin, Marriage & Family Therapist in MT HOLLY, NC
 

I work will all types of sexual behaviors, relationship configurations and non heteronormative expressions.

— Joseph Doherty, Psychologist in Portland, OR

As a sex therapist, I am sex positive and open to working with those who enjoy "non-traditional" experiences of sexual pleasure (and consensual pain). I will do everything in my power to feed your empowerment and starve your shame. The media and dominate culture already does a good job of feeding shame. I guarantee you that whatever you're into, and whatever you experience, you are more "normal" or "healthy" than you might think.

— Emily Graham, Therapist in Denver, CO

While therapy is supposed to be a place of acceptance and non-judgement, when it comes to sex some counselors aren't equipped to lovingly work with the kink community. As a kink-aware professional, I have worked with those in the lifestyle and received advanced training and education in the world of kink, fetish, and sex worker culture. Human sexuality is vibrant and varied - your flavor of expression is unique and valued.

— Katrina Knizek, Counselor in Spokane, WA
 

Kink positive and familiar to provide a space to navigate challenges within relationships.

— Jeni Yarbrough, Counselor in Los Angeles, CA
 

BDSM and kink is a lifestyle that adds intentional power exchange (PE) into relationships which explore sexual dominance, submission, fetishism, age-play, and other forms of kink. For some, kinky sex is used to 'spice things up' in the bedroom by adding new activities and toys to their sex life, while others use protocols of dominance and submission to structure their PE relationships. Consent and negotiation are at the heart of this lifestyle. Experience with sex work as well.

— Tammy 'Kaia' Bruski, Licensed Professional Counselor in Denver, CO

Safe, sane, consensual Self advocacy Contracts Navigating the community

— Jennifer Rosselli, Counselor in waltham, MA
 

I draw from my experience from years of experience as a leader in the gay male leather community and my associations with the larger kink community and my specialized training to provide therapy that embraces clients' sexual selves. I work with clients to be comfortable with their own sexuality. I understand the importance of a supportive therapeutic relationship whether the concerns are kink-related or if one simply wants a therapist who won't see your sex as the problem.

— Denis Flanigan, Psychologist in Houston, TX

Whether it is a kink, a polyamorous relationship, or an i-don't know-what-it-is, there is nothing that can't be talked about. I have a heavy interest in decreasing shame and stigma around sex and sexual interests, especially for those who don't identify in the majority. I have training in sex therapy and am informed around sexual outsiders.

— Laura Wood, Counselor in Seattle, WA
 

I work with people who want to celebrate, integrate, and learn more about their sexual interests. I also work with people who are disturbed by their sexual interests. These may be legal or illegal interests and I work on how, if possible, to integrate them into their sexual selves, as well as dealing with any shame. I also work with many couples who have differing sexual interests on how to navigate their sexual relationships and intimacy.

— Kate Sutton, Psychologist in Campbell, CA

I am kink-aware, friendly, and informed. Many of my clients who have a foot in this subculture often feel judged or are told that being in this subculture is what is wrong with them. I try to provide a soft and open, accepting place for clients to discuss their concerns and assist them in navigating this world in a healthy way.

— Samantha Roth, Social Worker in Baltimore, MD
 

Variations in sexuality are part of human nature, but the way our society sees it is highly stigmatized and being involved in the kink and bdsm community can be highly spiritual and gratifying experience. We work with the LGBTQIA and sex worker communities. Saying that you love sex work is healing. Recognizing the difference, because for some sex work is for survival we can help you with that, too.

— Moushumi Ghose, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in TOLUCA LAKE, CA

I work with people who enjoy a variety of sexual orientations including those outside the mainstream. You needn't have issues related to your sexuality and pleasures to work with me, but you can feel safe knowing that your 'lifestyle' will be embraced and won't be judged nor hidden in our work together.

— Cyndi Darnell, Sex Therapist in NYC, NY
 

I am comfortable working with relationships of any type or identity and ready to meet you where you are to discuss, with openness, any issues you want to address. If you are experiencing issues within your sex life, I am comfortable discussing any and all aspects that are concerning you. If you are part of the LGBTQIA+ community, involved in a polyamorous relationship, or engaged in BDSM/fetishism, you will find a safe and non-judgmental space to discuss this aspect of your life.

— Crystal Frederick, Counselor in Austin, TX

While therapy is supposed to be a place of acceptance and non-judgement, when it comes to sex some counselors aren't prepared to lovingly work with the kink community. As a kink-aware professional, I have worked with those in the lifestyle and received advanced training and education in the world of kink, fetish, and sex worker culture. Human sexuality is vibrant and varied - your flavor of expression is unique and valued.

— Katrina Knizek, Counselor in Spokane, WA
 

Kink, Fetish, BDSM, D/s (including TPE), etc. are all welcome and included in my knowledge base.

— Andrea Bezaire, Psychologist in Ann Arbor, MI

BDSM and kink is a lifestyle that adds intentional power exchange (PE) into relationships which explore sexual dominance, submission, fetishism, age-play, and other forms of kink. For some, kinky sex is used to spice things up in the bedroom by adding new activities and toys to their sex life, while others use protocols of dominance and submission to structure their PE relationships. Consent and negotiation are at the heart of this lifestyle. Substantial experience with sex work as well.

— Tammy 'Kaia' Bruski, Licensed Professional Counselor in Denver, CO
 

I am a firm believer that people in kink-based relationships often have healthier relationships than "vanilla" people, because so much is based on communication. But even the healthiest of relationships can run into rough patches. My goal is to create a safe space where we can explore what's wrong, and ways to fix it, without you ever feeling condemned for your kink.

— LAKink Shrink, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in West Los Angeles, CA

There's a big overlap between those who are sexually adventurous enough to explore non-monogamy and those who gravitate towards kink. Both require people to let go of societal norms to make choices regarding their pursuit of pleasure on their own terms. I admire and appreciate the inherent authenticity in that and strive to help others release any shame or fears that may still be getting in their way of experiencing optimal pleasure and joy.

— Anna Dow, Marriage & Family Therapist in online, CA
 

I currently run two groups related to kink/sexual outsiders. The "Edging Sexual Norms" group is designed for people with fetishes and "non-normative" sexual preferences that have been a consistent source of distress, shame, or tension in their day-to-day lives. Through focused group work facilitated by a clinical sexologist, clients will learn to explore and express their sexuality without shame. They will overcome social stigmas. And they will learn to integrate their

— Jan Tate, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Mebane, NC

I am kink-aware and have experience working with D/s relationships and various fetishes, kinks and alternative lifestyles. I do not judge or assume there is something "wrong" with you for your sexual expression.

— Meghan Cleveland, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Pasadena, CA
 

Kink is one of those very tricky topics. Some view it as sexual perversion. Others view it as freeing, but are shamed that they like something. However, Kink as a whole is much more common than you may realize. A recent study found that over 40% of Americans surveyed self identified as having particular kink or fetish. Much like poly, the problem for couples can arise when one expresses curiosity and the other person has some aversion or kinkphobia. If you are curious, I can help.

— Philip Justice, Registered Marriage and Family Therapist Intern in Jacksonville, FL

I provide a safe place for people to come in and share who they are.

— Veronica Ulery, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Northwood, NH
 

Societal expectations around sexuality and relationships often have an impact on us. This is especially true for people who identify as asexual or kinky, or participate in sexual or non-sexual kink. Before being a therapist, I had the privilege to form connections within local and larger kink communities. As a former member of Kink and Poly Aware Chicago Therapists (KPACT), I broadened my knowledge even further through formal clinical training.

— Eric Mills, Counselor in Federal Way, WA

I'm not someone who just will tolerate your sexual identity; I have wide-ranging knowledge of BDSM and sex work, strong ties to those communities, and a nuanced perspective on the benefits and pitfalls of those aspects of identity. Ultimately I am not interested in steering you toward or away from any particular way of being, but supporting you in making the best possible decisions for yourself.

— Jessica Gioia, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Alameda, CA

I have done extensive research and trainings in the BDSM & polyamorous/non-monogamous lifestyles. I have also gone through sex therapy and couples counseling trainings to help provide non-judgmental couples therapy. I am very open and comfortable working with kink friendly and sex positive communities as well as those outrside of these populations.

— Karla Kurtz, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Everett, WA
 

Have you recently discovered that you have some kink fantasies that you want to explore with your partner(s) but are unsure how to bring it up? I pride myself on giving a space for you an your partner(s) to allow expression of relationship issues & exploration while feeling heard by a neutral party (myself) that affirmatively supports issues in this community while also noting that identifying as being part of this community may not have anything to do with your relationship issues.

— Paige Bond, Registered Marriage and Family Therapist Intern in Longwood, FL