Life transitions

Change is hard, even in the best of circumstances and adjusting to major life transitions, even when they are positive, can be difficult. Whether you are getting married, moving, changing jobs, having a child – or any of the other many transitions we can expect as part of life – coping and navigating the stress of a major change can cause depression and anxiety, among other issues. If you are having trouble with accepting or adjusting to life transition, a qualified mental health professional can help you find healthy ways of coping. Rach out to one of TherapyDen’s life transition experts today. 

Meet the specialists

Perhaps you’re going through a transition of sorts, such as a change of relationship or a new season of life. These transitions can often cast a new light on how we see ourselves and our world, and shake up our routine. It is likely you may experience anxiety, frustration, sadness. Maybe you’ve noticed a change in your sleeping or eating, too. I would like to partner with you to navigate these changes, and come alongside as you solidify your identity, beliefs, and values. There may be a pattern of thinking or stress you’re caught in that is a barrier to you feeling your best or achieving what you hope to. Unhelpful thought patterns can also become a wedge in our relationships with loved ones or even in work places. An unhealthy habit or toxic thinking are like a weed in the mind, and together we will uproot it and replace it with health thoughts and behaviors.

— Katheryn de Arakal, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Pasadena, CA
 

The inevitable losses and regrets of midlife — the close of a career, the death of a parent, widowhood, divorce or the onset of chronic medical problems bring their own challenges in part because they trigger a lot of old stuff that might not have been dealt with. Midlife is all about managing change without letting it overwhelm you. Kids leave the nest, parents die, your own health declines or maybe you lose your job in a round of layoffs. It can all leave you feeling at sea. Even positive changes — retirement or the birth of a first grandchild, for example — can be stressful in ways you may not expect. Professional counseling could help you sort it all out, even if you’ve never considered it before. When life happens to people in their 50s and 60s, it just hits much harder. It really seems to activate a desire to get meaning out of that event.

— Radmila Hollnagel, Licensed Professional Counselor in Charlotte, NC

Figuring out "what's next" is never easy. Whether it's deciding what life should look like after a change in relationship status, a career shift, graduation, starting a family, contemplating retirement or receiving a significant health diagnosis, sometimes a non-objective source of support can be helpful in determining how to make the next chapter feel more purposeful and meaningful.

— Sara Blackmur, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Seattle, WA
 

Times have changed. There is no longer a prescribed life plan for you. It is now typical for individuals in their 20-30s to ask the questions “Who am I?” and “What do I want my life to look like?” These shifts have reflected significant changes in how you might relate to the world around you and how others in society view you. With these shifts a certain amount of anxiety and grief is expected. However, when you feel overwhelmed or underprepared to face the stress of a transition, more serious symptoms of anxiety and depression may develop and affect mood, motivation, and decision-making skills. These types of issues can affect your social, emotional, and physical well-being and make it difficult for you to develop or sustain meaningful relationships and to work toward educational and occupational goals. I am trained to help you become more aware of your emotional responses to these challenges and help you recognize problematic relational patterns and new ways to cope.

— Shannon Gonter, Counselor in Louisville, KY

Life transitions such as moving, changing jobs, or experiencing a significant loss can be difficult for anyone. With change, sometimes comes a fear of the unknown. I help clients develop a sense of being able to handle anything that may come their way, expected or unexpected.

— Matianna Baldassari, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Santa Monica, CA
 

Life transitions…we all go through them (yay and sigh), and many of my clients report difficulty navigating the tangled web of mixed feelings. How is it that something so good can conjure up feelings of anxiety, frustration, overwhelm, or stress? And how is it that something so bad or icky can conjure feelings of relief? How do you tackle such a conundrum? Yep, I’ve been there too. Along the way I’ve found that the process of working through or into a life transition is different each one of my clients (and me too). The good news… there are manageable ways to navigate and make sense of your unique situation.

— Sheila Tucker, Counselor in Bluffton, SC

I provide my clients with hands-on practical tools to use during their life transitions, whether it be a divorce, major medical procedure, death of a loved one, breakup, career change, or other life change.

— Montrella Cowan, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Washington, DC
 

The transition to adulthood can be especially difficult and challenging. The rapid physiological, sexual, cognitive, and emotional changes often characterizing this period of your life may be overwhelming. I am here to help you work on understanding who you are becoming, determine your dreams and life goals, and discover how you can turn those goals into reality.

— Raeleen Davis, Licensed Professional Counselor in Rochester Hills, MI

Life does not come with an owners manual so where do we turn for help when things come up we are not prepared for? I work with clients trying to sort out their feelings regarding life transitions. Whether the situation is unexpected (new medical diagnosis or divorce) or is expected (kids going off to college or retirement), I am here to help you understand your thoughts and feelings at your pace in an environment filled with respect. Reach out for a free consultation.

— Cheryl Perry, Licensed Professional Counselor in Charlotte, NC
 

I enjoy working with clients facing new challenges. Whether it be starting college, a new job, or becoming a parent. I hope to be a resource and a grounding force to help clients feel more secure and confident.

— Jocelyn Van Hee, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Sandy, OR

Major life transitions don't have to begin and end with suffering. Transitions give you the opportunity to assess what is working and what is not working, to get in touch with who you are and who you want to be. To consciously decide what you would like your life to look like and design your future. There is much potential when a major transition shakes up your world, but it can be difficult to harness this power when you are in the midst of pain.

— Christina Wall, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Lake Oswego, OR
 

Many individuals I have worked with are struggling through a life transition of some sort. I find that it is helpful to sit with others during tough times, rather than taking that burden on yourself. Many clients I see are going through transitions of aging, death, job relocation, relationship transitions and many others.

— Miranda Bayard-Clark, Licensed Professional Counselor in Lake Oswego, OR

Life transitions include starting a new relationship, separating or divorcing, job changes, loss of a loved one, moves, changes in health, and much more. If you are looking for support while you contemplate or are in the midst of these changes, please reach out.

— Lauren Bloom, Social Worker in Berkeley, CA

Our lives involve many transitions related to couple or marital relationships, family, parenting, education, work, jobs, careers, health, retirement, aging and death. Life transitions always involve grieving the loss of what was and the uncertainty of a new beginning. Throughout my life I have worked with clients in therapy and my consulting work that are navigating toward something new in their personal and work lives.

— M. Douglas Evans, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Ann Arbor, MI
 

Life changes can be difficult because they can challenge your self confidence and sense of identity. I have worked with many people through life transitions such as navigating college, finding work, changing careers, coping with unemployment, marriage, parenthood, retirement, caregiving, and serious health problems. I have also worked with many people who are healing from marginalization or mistreatment due to some aspect of their identity.

— Sarah Scheckter, Psychologist in Bryn Mawr, PA

Helping people through life changes is one of my passions. Even good change can be hard change, and I approach this work from a perspective of helping you find your values and your voice. I can help you can find hope and direction through the most difficult storms.

— Lisa Hedden, Counselor in Tucker, GA
 

I work with adults, couples and young people undergoing life transitions where instability, overwhelm, fear and doubt are common. Together we support you to feel resilient and empowered in the in the presence of the "UNKNOWN", to grieve what you are letting go of and to welcome in what's coming next.

— Jacquelyn Richards, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco, CA

We all can use support while having large changes in our lives and how to cope with upcoming changes. Reaching out for help during those times is an act of courage!

— Casey Cullen, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Dallas, TX
 

Change through therapy should not only involve self-understanding and insight into the past, but should also focus on helping clients to learn skills for present-time challenges. My approach helps clients to develop specific tools and skills for thinking and acting in constructive, healthy ways.

— Kirsten Lesch, Counselor in Skaneateles, NY

Working through struggles often is the pathway to a new and better you. Whatever you are going through, if you handle the situation properly you can use it as leverage to make your life better. I am here to help you see yourself, the role you are playing in your life and the one you could be. It's not a dress rehearsal. If you aren't getting the results you want you need to try a different approach.

— Tracy Braden, Counselor in Portland, OR
 

Changes in jobs, employment status, moving cities, entering or leaving a relationship. These are all common life transitions that can cause stress, anxiety and depression. I specialize in working with women who are experiencing high levels of stress and/or anxiety due to a recent life transition or traumatic event.

— Gwendolyn Nelson-Terry, Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco, CA

Times have changed. There is no longer a prescribed life plan for you. It is now typical for individuals in their 20-30s to ask the questions “Who am I?” and “What do I want my life to look like?” These shifts have reflected significant changes in how you might relate to the world around you and how others in society view you. With these shifts a certain amount of anxiety and grief is expected. However, when you feel overwhelmed or underprepared to face the stress of a transition, more serious symptoms of anxiety and depression may develop and affect mood, motivation, and decision-making skills. These types of issues can affect your social, emotional, and physical well-being and make it difficult for you to develop or sustain meaningful relationships and to work toward educational and occupational goals. I am trained to help you become more aware of your emotional responses to these challenges and help you recognize problematic relational patterns and new ways to cope.

— Shannon Gonter, Counselor in Louisville, KY
 

I have worked with many clients experiencing life transitions, including marriage, divorce, becoming a parent, starting a new school/job, and losing a loved one, among others. I particularly enjoy being able to help my clients navigate all of the environmental and emotional changes that occur during these transitions in a healthy and successful manner.

— Karen Foreman, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in AURORA, IL

I have worked with individuals facing a variety of major life transitions, including marriage, divorce, parenting, retirement, and end-of-life. I find that these turning points are times that bring strong emotions, deep fears, and threats to our identity and sense of self. Most often, these are new experiences which we don't have the experience of having survived before, and so we are confronted with our fears of the unknown and the need to find new ways of making meaning from our experiences. For many of us, we find that major life transitions make the coping skills we've developed and practiced thus far seem inadequate to these new challenges. Drawing from a strengths- and solution-based perspective, I work to help people in the midst of life transitions find a sense of stability in otherwise chaotic times and gain the confidence to move as gracefully as possible through them.

— Josh Rothenberg, Clinical Psychologist in San Francisco, CA
 

Many of us reach out when we feel the need for support, or help working through challenging times. Sometimes we face challenges we think are too difficult to manage alone. I believe in taking a strength-based, client-centered integrative approach to psychotherapy, working with you to help you grow toward your best self. The familiar ways you have of dealing with life's complications may not be working; together we can work to identify new positive means of change.

— Barton Shulman, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in San Francisco, CA

Many of us reach out when we feel the need for support, or help working through challenging times. Sometimes we face challenges we think are too difficult to manage alone. I believe in taking a strength-based, client-centered approach to psychotherapy, working with you to help you grow toward your best self. The familiar ways you have of dealing with life's complications may not be working; together we can work to identify new positive means of change.

— Barton Shulman, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in San Francisco, CA
 

Times have changed. There is no longer a prescribed life plan for you. It is now typical for individuals in their 20-30s to ask the questions “Who am I?” and “What do I want my life to look like?” These shifts have reflected significant changes in how you might relate to the world around you and how others in society view you. With these shifts a certain amount of anxiety and grief is expected. However, when you feel overwhelmed or underprepared to face the stress of a transition, more serious symptoms of anxiety and depression may develop and affect mood, motivation, and decision-making skills. These types of issues can affect your social, emotional, and physical well-being and make it difficult for you to develop or sustain meaningful relationships and to work toward educational and occupational goals. I am trained to help you become more aware of your emotional responses to these challenges and help you recognize problematic relational patterns and new ways to cope.

— Shannon Gonter, Counselor in Louisville, KY

Major life transitions don't have to begin and end with suffering. Transitions give you the opportunity to assess what is working and what is not working, to get in touch with who you are and who you want to be. To consciously decide what you would like your life to look like and design your future. There is much potential when a major transition shakes up your world, but it can be difficult to harness this power when you are in the midst of pain.

— Christina Wall, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Lake Oswego, OR
 

When our lives change, whether it be a relationship, career, or any other part of life, our worlds can feel like they are turned upside down. I work with clients experiencing life transitions in the process of acceptance, reinvention, and ultimately strive to support you along your journey towards creating a life that is peaceful, fulfilling, and YOURS.

— Deborah Nichols, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Portland, OR

The inevitable losses and regrets of midlife — the close of a career, the death of a parent, widowhood, divorce or the onset of chronic medical problems bring their own challenges in part because they trigger a lot of old stuff that might not have been dealt with. Midlife is all about managing change without letting it overwhelm you. Kids leave the nest, parents die, your own health declines or maybe you lose your job in a round of layoffs. It can all leave you feeling at sea. Even positive changes — retirement or the birth of a first grandchild, for example — can be stressful in ways you may not expect. Professional counseling could help you sort it all out, even if you’ve never considered it before. When life happens to people in their 50s and 60s, it just hits much harder. It really seems to activate a desire to get meaning out of that event. Midlife “is like going through adolescence again, you’re trying to figure out who you are.”

— Radmila Hollnagel, Licensed Professional Counselor in Charlotte, NC
 

Big life transitions-- often exciting AND terrifying. I work with people to understand all the feelings that come up with big changes (new job, new baby, relationship change, recent move to NYC, etc). Through awareness and understanding of the feelings coming up, and taking an objective look at your own goals and vision for your life, we can work together to make these adjustments go more smoothly.

— Katie Peterson, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Brooklyn, NY
 

So much of our confidence and purpose comes from our identity- and if you're making a big shift, you can find that confidence dwindling. In therapy, we'll help you find your steadiness as you navigate this new chapter.

— Abigail Thompson, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco, CA

Working through struggles often is the pathway to a new and better you. Whatever you are going through, if you handle the situation properly you can use it as leverage to make your life better. I am here to help you see yourself, the role you are playing in your life and the one you could be. It's not a dress rehearsal. If you aren't getting the results you want you need to try a different approach.

— Tracy Braden, Counselor in Portland, OR
 

As a school counselor working in high schools for the past 10+ years, I specialize in working with high school seniors and college freshmen who are having difficulties moving forward in their lives. As a society, we offer very little acknowledgment of this important stage in the lives of our young people. There is no ritual, other than the graduation ceremony, to mark the transition from one stage to another. It is vital for us to begin to hold space for our children, so they have a space to discuss their fears about moving on to college or into the unknown world of work. Many of them struggle with this and simply 'go through the motions' often ending up at colleges they are not a good match for, on a career path that does not suite their unique talents or are in a space where they have yet to develop those talents and feel guilty or left behind as a result.

— Tiffany Ashe, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Durham, NC

It's not a question of if transitions will occur, they are a fact of everyone's life. What stands in the way of making the most of a transition that ultimately benefits us, is figuring out how to step out of our own way. In my work, I look at the thoughts that hold you back from stepping into opportunity. From making a choice that your inner wisdom is nudging you to step into, but your thoughts are getting in the way, holding you back.

— Joanne Royer, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Acradia, CA
 

Planned or unplanned life events, significant health challenges, loss of a relationship, career or retirement transitions

— Kelly Pemberton, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Sacramento, CA

Young adult, flooded with overwhelming career and lifestyle options and obligations? New parent, with no time to support your own needs and desires? You've entered midlife, and you're not where you thought you'd be: Wrong career, partner? Kids? No kids? Older adult with unfulfilled life desires? It's time to build the authentic life you've always desired!

— Lisa SLOAN STROM, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR
 

Are in what I like to call a holding period. life is changing, faster than you can adapt? Just finished /started school or a new career? Kids left and the person that is left home with you no longer knows you? Are you on the cusp of a big change? Did you lose a loved one or relationship has changed from the way you once knew it? Does getting up in the morning sound and feel like a bad idea? Or _________ (insert yours here) is just too much to bear and you need help.

— Jessica Jefferson, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Plantation,

Are you feeling frustrated, blocked, burned out, and desperately wanting to grow beyond to a bigger vision for yourself and your contribution to the world? Perhaps your calling is coming in the form of anxiety, pain/tension, panic, or depression in the present and you are seeking support finding what's next. Or perhaps you know where you're headed, and you don't want to repeat the past. Therapy is a place where you can learn to listen more deeply to and honor what can bring you joy and fulfillment. I work with you in mind and body to connect to what is true to you, relationally to support you finding new ways of bringing yourself to the world, and with attention to the what matters to you. Each stage of growth is an opportunity for healing.

— Eveline Wu, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Oakland, CA
 

The only thing in life that is constant is change. Most people struggle with life transitions, such as moving, job change, becoming parents, coming out, or entering and exiting relationships. With each transition we go through there is both a struggle and an opportunity for growth. I work with clients who are undergoing many life transitions. Three types of transitions I specialize in are: parenting young children, coming out as LGBTQ+, and leaving college. For parents of young children, I provide a supportive environment where parents can develop their own ideas of how they want to balance parenting, home life, work, and self care. For individuals who identify as LGBTQ+, I provide a space for clients to explore their identity and learn to live in a world that is not always affirming. And finally, for recent college graduates I provide a space to help them identify their own values outside of a structured path and help identify what is most important to them.

— Allison Karthaus, Psychologist in Boston, MA

As I studied Human Development many years ago, I remember being amazed at how it seemed the final frontier for humans has been understanding themselves. So many of our moments of emotional turmoil can stem from the transitions -- some predictable & others unexpected -- that are unavoidable in life. Incredibly, sometimes just having the space and time to "process" out loud, talk through our life's details, can bring healing resolution. Occasionally, we get stuck in a reactive pattern that creates even more challenges for us. Looking through different perspectives can help us find our way.

— Tracy Morris, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Spring, TX
 

You’re seeking help because you’re smart, motivated, yet you feel insecure or ambivalent in your relationships. You feel guilty or ashamed, stuck in the same thought spiral day-in and day-out. There’s a little voice in your head that criticizes and questions every decision you make. You’ve worked hard to get where you are, but still feel like you fall short. You’re tired of feeling judged, most of all by yourself. I work with adults struggling with quarter-life crisis and navigating intimate relationships. I will help you find immediate relief from what feels overwhelming, while also exploring deeper concerns. We’ll work to discover answers and collaborate in a deep way to make sense of your experiences, create meaning, and grow.

— Ashleigh Edelstein, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Austin, TX

Times have changed. There is no longer a prescribed life plan for you. It is now typical for individuals in their 20-30s to ask the questions “Who am I?” and “What do I want my life to look like?” These shifts have reflected significant changes in how you might relate to the world around you and how others in society view you. With these shifts a certain amount of anxiety and grief is expected. However, when you feel overwhelmed or underprepared to face the stress of a transition, more serious symptoms of anxiety and depression may develop and affect mood, motivation, and decision-making skills. These types of issues can affect your social, emotional, and physical well-being and make it difficult for you to develop or sustain meaningful relationships and to work toward educational and occupational goals. I am trained to help you become more aware of your emotional responses to these challenges and help you recognize problematic relational patterns and new ways to cope.

— Shannon Gonter, Counselor in Louisville, KY
 

I specialize in mid-life and teens, both times of questioning, growth, and self-awareness.I'm a mid-lifer and have experience with the challenges it entails. I have worked extensively with teens both individually and in school sittings and was once a teen myself!

— Nancy Chirinos, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco, CA

Sometimes we come to points in our lives where the stories we've been living about who we are and how our lives are supposed to unfold no longer fit. Sometimes this happens because of a loss or major life event. Sometimes it's just part of getting older. Sometimes what was working well for a long time suddenly no longer works, and we can't really pinpoint why. I collaborate with people in developing new frameworks that can support them as they figure out where to go next.

— Kathryn Stinson, Counselor in St. Louis, MO
 

Divorce, retirement, death, new career, empty nest, even buying or selling a house are just a few examples of life’s transitions that can leave you feeling preoccupied, stressed, worried, exhausted or overwhelmed. Adjustments are a part of everyone’s life and some changes are easier than others to adapt to. Trying to be the perfect parent, spouse, adult child, co-worker, friend is leaving you feeling exhausted and overwhelmed and you wonder why you are not living up to your own standards. You don’t have to blame yourself or wonder, “What is wrong with me?”. Stop beating yourself up. Let’s work together and to explore your feelings, receive support, discover your strengths and develop new strategies to help you understand, cope and accept the transitions of your authentic life with positivity. Stop feeling like an “Imposter” and start finding self-acceptance.

— Allison Glorioso, Mental Health Counselor in Fort Myers, FL

The inevitable losses and regrets of midlife — the close of a career, the death of a parent, widowhood, divorce or the onset of chronic medical problems bring their own challenges in part because they trigger a lot of old stuff that might not have been dealt with. Midlife is all about managing change without letting it overwhelm you. Kids leave the nest, parents die, your own health declines or maybe you lose your job in a round of layoffs. It can all leave you feeling at sea. Even positive changes — retirement or the birth of a first grandchild, for example — can be stressful in ways you may not expect. Professional counseling could help you sort it all out, even if you’ve never considered it before. When life happens to people in their 50s and 60s, it just hits much harder. It really seems to activate a desire to get meaning out of that event. Midlife “is like going through adolescence again, you’re trying to figure out who you are.”

— Radmila Hollnagel, Licensed Professional Counselor in Charlotte, NC
 

Ahhh....Adulting. Are you struggling to figure out your direction as an adult after years of knowing exactly what you "should" be doing? The rules for Adulting seem to be hidden away somewhere that no one knows! You thought it would be exciting, and it can be, but you had no idea how lonely and confused you would feel. As crazy as it sounds, this can be a wonderful time to learn more about yourself– what makes you tick, what do you really want for your life, and where are you stuck? Life these days moves at the speed of light. Life transitions seem to come a lot more frequently than they used to, and they can hit us by surprise. We go through life transitions after getting into long-term committed relationships, after having kids, raising teenagers (don't get me started!), and again when the kids leave home (or mostly leave...). These are all terrific times for personal growth! We can sort through the crazy feelings ("I love it–I hate it!") and find a path to growth and joy.

— Amy McManus, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA

LIFE CHALLENGES (RELATIONSHIPS: couples, families or work, and TRANSITIONS: marriage/divorce, parenting, career, illness, mourning ...)

— Pascale Brady, Counselor in Gaithersburg, MD
 

Life changing events and transitions can cause so many different and uncomfortable emotions to come to the surface. Perhaps there are changes in your family, work, relationships, health or home life. Sometimes these are planned and sometimes they are unexpected but either way, they can bring uncertainty, concern and worry to your life. Learning how to adjust to new situations takes time, understanding, patience and support. I am that person to help you transition to this new part of your life.

— Jan Nelson, Social Worker in NEW YORK, NY

As someone who worked with high schoolers & college students for years before becoming a therapist, I understand the stress, anxiety, and complications that come with such big transitional periods of life.

— Robert Vore, Counselor in Smyrna, GA

Life transitions are something we all experience in life, whether it be a job transition, move, relationship change or other significant life event. Many of the clients I see are going through some form of transition in their lives and needing additional support and understanding around this. I help clients to explore their current needs and values to find grounding and greater trust in the self during a time of significant change.

— Megan Miller, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in , OR
 

- Significant clinical experience working with young adults launching into adulthood including counseling to prepare for college, while in college, as careers are launched, relationships change and separation from family system occur.

— Rachelle Marshall, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Orange, CA
 

Life transitions can include, but is not limited to: Career Changes Geographic Changes (expats) Deciding to stay or leave a relationship Role Change (new parent, single, retired) College transition Relationship changes Pet Loss/Grief Gender/sexual identity exploration

— Rachael Lastoff, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in elon, NC