Life transitions

Change is hard, even in the best of circumstances and adjusting to major life transitions, even when they are positive, can be difficult. Whether you are getting married, moving, changing jobs, having a child – or any of the other many transitions we can expect as part of life – coping and navigating the stress of a major change can cause depression and anxiety, among other issues. If you are having trouble with accepting or adjusting to life transition, a qualified mental health professional can help you find healthy ways of coping. Rach out to one of TherapyDen’s life transition experts today. 

Meet the specialists

Whether chosen or not, life transitions can be a pivotal time for personal growth. I am passionate about supporting people in the day-to-day challenges that come with change and helping people in zooming out to see the big picture of possibilities and potential that life is providing.

— Ellie Lotan, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Berkeley, CA
 

As I studied Human Development many years ago, I remember being amazed at how it seemed the final frontier for humans has been understanding themselves. So many of our moments of emotional turmoil can stem from the transitions -- some predictable & others unexpected -- that are unavoidable in life. Incredibly, sometimes just having the space and time to "process" out loud, talk through our life's details, can bring healing resolution. Occasionally, we get stuck in a reactive pattern that creates even more challenges for us. Looking through different perspectives can help us find our way.

— Tracy Morris, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Spring, TX

Life transitions are a normal part of life. I think that makes it especially difficult to seek help if we we are having difficulty in this area. We feel something is wrong with us if we’re feeling uneasy or struggling with a transition, such as getting married, moving , starting a new career , getting ready for our children to go to off college and many more. The truth is , most of us do struggle with these changes and transitions in our lives. Let’s talk it out 🙂

— Lisa Fulfor, Clinical Social Worker in Frisco, TX
 

Life transitions can take many forms and come at any age whether it is a new relationship, a growing family, the launching of a child, navigating emerging adulthood, marriage, divorce, career changes, or the loss of a loved one change is a constant in our lives. Often times it is during these times of change when we struggle the most emotionally. What once was familiar and knowing is now ambiguous and unknown.

— Dan Schmitt, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist Intern in Eugene, OR

Life transitions are tricky. They test our ability to dwell in the unknown. The unknown is scary. These major transitions can be wanted or unwanted, and therefore accompanied by mixed emotions of joy, excitement, anxiety and grief. Together we will work through the concurrent feelings to identify your resiliency and strengths to help you on your journey through your current period of uncertainty to uncover the life you want.

— Jennifer Alt, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist
 

Many of us reach out when we feel the need for support, or help working through challenging times. Sometimes we face challenges we think are too difficult to manage alone. I believe in taking a strength-based, client-centered integrative approach to psychotherapy, working with you to help you grow toward your best self. The familiar ways you have of dealing with life's complications may not be working; together we can work to identify new positive means of change.

— Barton Shulman, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in San Francisco, CA

Change is a wondrous thing, bringing about new opportunities and possibilities. It is also inherently uncomfortable for us humans, capable of clouding our judgment, stirring up old wounds, and revealing the parts of us that we may have neglected. In your time of transition, my role is to help you establish a clear vision for change, and to guide you in fostering the hidden possibilities that can serve to be the nutrients for a more fulfilling life.

— I-Ching Grace Hung, Psychologist in San Francisco, CA
 

Relationships shifting, divorce, becoming a parent, or transitioning into a new career post motherhood? I'm familiar with the life transitions that are unique to being a woman. Whether you're graduating college and have no idea what comes next or you're stepping back into the workforce, I've got you covered.

— Leah Rockwell, Licensed Professional Counselor in Mercersburg, PA

Life changes frequently and sometimes we are not ready for the new stage that we are entering into. Whether it is from a career change, divorce or relationship change, or empty nest syndrome there will be emotions attached to the transition. Life transitions can impact our self-identity leaving us in a space of questioning whether selling umbrella drinks on a beach in Fiji is your best bet. Life transitions can be scary but also exciting as you start a new adventure.

— Melissa Russiano, Clinical Social Worker
 

I have gone through many of these and have developed tools for honoring your feelings, sorting through decisions and finding what is most true. Finding an adult identity, struggling with separating from parents, leaving a marriage, going through a divorce, parenting solo, co-parenting, starting a new career. I have been through all of the above. I can help you learn tools to feel grounded in your decision making, honor your feelings and work through your perceptions of others' judgment.

— Toby Williams, Creative Art Therapist in Brooklyn, NY

Many of us reach out when we feel the need for support, or help working through challenging times. Sometimes we face challenges we think are too difficult to manage alone. I believe in taking a strength-based, client-centered approach to psychotherapy, working with you to help you grow toward your best self. The familiar ways you have of dealing with life's complications may not be working; together we can work to identify new positive means of change.

— Barton Shulman, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in San Francisco, CA
 

Life transitions is a has a very broad meaning; this can mean transistors such as identifying sexuality, gender identity, relationship preferences, relationship concerns, mental health symptoms, addiction, career changes, grief and loss, break ups, moving to a new location and many others. This may include short term or sometimes long term therapy. The most important part is to have someone to support you in a healing and non-judgment space.

— Adrienne Marcellus, Counselor in Asheville, NC

Stepping into a new relationship? Getting engaged or married? Becoming a father? These are life cycle transitions that can appear pretty normal from a distance, however when you are going through them it can be scary and difficult. Having a place to talk about your fears, worries, and insecurities can help you find effective ways to cope through these transitions. Coping helps you become more mindful of these feelings so your not reacting to them, and instead feel more in control.

— Manny Romero, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Clemente, CA
 

Life transitions are the most common times that people seek therapy. Whether moving toward engagement or marriage, leaving for college, having children, raising kids or moving toward retirement, individuals find themselves in new roles and facing new challenges. Samantha is well-versed in all of these life stages and can set specific goals based on clients’ internal resources and strengths.

— Samantha Lavy, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Stamford, CT

I enjoy working with clients going into, through, or out of life changes. Our resilience is needed most when our sense of stability is shaken. Our minds are the key to making sure our perspective is helpful and honest and not brutal or disillusioned.

— Tiffany Lindley, Licensed Professional Counselor in Dallas, TX
 

Sometimes we reach a point in life where we recognize we have given much of ourselves away that we are not sure who we are anymore. We can lose ourselves in our jobs, our families, in illness, or divorce. Maybe you are nearing retirement and are uncertain about what your days will look like? Or perhaps you have recently had a baby and feel overwhelmed? Maybe you are a caregiver to your parents? Support is integral in navigating these life changes.

— Eileen Martin, Counselor in Gibsonville, NC

Life dishes out many changes for us (some we expect and plan for, some we never see coming), and it can be a struggle to adjust to the new normal. Some examples of life transitions include: moving away from home, job loss, marriage, questioning one's gender identity, serious illness, starting a new job, having a baby, etc. All of these events afford us the opportunity to reexamine our present way of being and to process with supportive, objective guidance can be so beneficial.

— Dr. Dana Avey, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Colorado Springs, CO
 

Individuals in our society are experiencing more changes than ever before. Whether it's moving to college, changing your profession, or navigating a break-up, transitions have a tendency to exacerbate our worries and worsen our moods. By applying techniques from DBT and SFBT, I will help you better tolerate the distress that arises from change, identify coping skills that work best for you, and strengthen the resilience you already have within.

— Saira Malhotra, Therapist in Greenwood Village, CO

Change is a wondrous thing, bringing about new opportunities and possibilities. It is also inherently uncomfortable for us humans, capable of clouding our judgment, stirring up old wounds, and revealing the parts of us that we may have neglected. In your time of transition, my role is to help you establish a clear vision for change, and to guide you in fostering the hidden possibilities that can serve to be the nutrients for a more fulfilling life.

— I-Ching Grace Hung, Psychologist in San Francisco, CA