Life transitions

Change is hard, even in the best of circumstances and adjusting to major life transitions, even when they are positive, can be difficult. Whether you are getting married, moving, changing jobs, having a child – or any of the other many transitions we can expect as part of life – coping and navigating the stress of a major change can cause depression and anxiety, among other issues. If you are having trouble with accepting or adjusting to life transition, a qualified mental health professional can help you find healthy ways of coping. Rach out to one of TherapyDen’s life transition experts today. 

Meet the specialists

 

Young adult, flooded with overwhelming career and lifestyle options and obligations? New parent, with no time to support your own needs and desires? You've entered midlife, and you're not where you thought you'd be: Wrong career, partner? Kids? No kids? Older adult with unfulfilled life desires? It's time to build the authentic life you've always desired!

— Lisa SLOAN STROM, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR
 

I work with adults, couples and young people undergoing life transitions where instability, overwhelm, fear and doubt are common. Together we support you to feel resilient and empowered in the in the presence of the "UNKNOWN", to grieve what you are letting go of and to welcome in what's coming next.

— Jacquelyn Richards, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco, CA
 

This as an umbrella heading for many situations. You could be graduating college, moving from one city to another, changing careers, or reevaluating your personal values. We are constantly growing and changing. That is the good news. Sometimes, however, change is thrust upon us through death, divorce, or some other type of loss. The ground may feel unsteady beneath your feet. You may feel broken open. My desire is to help you make sense of things and come out the other end a stronger person.

— Jennifer Knox, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco, CA
 

Times have changed. There is no longer a prescribed life plan for you. It is now typical for individuals in their 20-30s to ask the questions “Who am I?” and “What do I want my life to look like?” These shifts have reflected significant changes in how you might relate to the world around you and how others in society view you. With these shifts a certain amount of anxiety and grief is expected. However, when you feel overwhelmed or underprepared to face the stress of a transition, more serious symptoms of anxiety and depression may develop and affect mood, motivation, and decision-making skills. These types of issues can affect your social, emotional, and physical well-being and make it difficult for you to develop or sustain meaningful relationships and to work toward educational and occupational goals. I am trained to help you become more aware of your emotional responses to these challenges and help you recognize problematic relational patterns and new ways to cope.

— Shannon Gonter, Counselor in Louisville, KY

As I studied Human Development many years ago, I remember being amazed at how it seemed the final frontier for humans has been understanding themselves. So many of our moments of emotional turmoil can stem from the transitions -- some predictable & others unexpected -- that are unavoidable in life. Incredibly, sometimes just having the space and time to "process" out loud, talk through our life's details, can bring healing resolution. Occasionally, we get stuck in a reactive pattern that creates even more challenges for us. Looking through different perspectives can help us find our way.

— Tracy Morris, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Spring, TX

Life is full of transitions and we don't always see them as we are immersed within them. I see clients who are working through new life, death, marriages, divorces, empty nest syndrome, parenting issues, and any situation that challenges their peace of mind.

— Tracey R Cobb, Counselor in Marietta, GA
 

Life's transitions can be tough to navigate on your own - the teenage years, becoming a college student, graduating as a young adult, entering adulthood, and even starting your own business. Together we can process your journey and discover ways to cope with change.

— Sabrina Fish, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Hermosa Beach, CA

Life is complicated. So is change. When there's significant changes occurring in your own life, it can get overwhelming at times. I understand what struggles changes in life can bring, and the need for outside perspective during these transitions. I have spent countless sessions helping people navigate and understand options, weigh decisions, and reach great outcomes. I believe I can do that for you.

— Robert Hinojosa, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Little Rock, AR
 

- Significant clinical experience working with young adults launching into adulthood including counseling to prepare for college, while in college, as careers are launched, relationships change and separation from family system occur.

— Rachelle Marshall, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Orange, CA
 

All humans have some difficulty coping with change. This can range from child/youth developmental issues to births, deaths, breakups, relationship stages and conflicts. It can also affect how well we adapt to different needs and circumstances. And obviously, if you’re in relationship with someone going through changes, you will need to change too. That’s why I love working with relationship issues, as well as parental coaching.

— Maria Orr, Marriage & Family Therapist in Corvallis, OR

When our lives change, whether it be a relationship, career, or any other part of life, our worlds can feel like they are turned upside down. I work with clients experiencing life transitions in the process of acceptance, reinvention, and ultimately strive to support you along your journey towards creating a life that is peaceful, fulfilling, and YOURS.

— Deborah Nichols, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Portland, OR
 

Divorce, breakups, career changes, grief, medical issues, sexual exploration, gender exploration and other things can shake us up. It’s difficult when life shifts and all of your best laid plans and beliefs about the future fall apart. The way you viewed yourself, others, and the world may be changing. The foundation you thought was there may be disappearing. While life transitions can be painful and challenging, they also come with new opportunities and possibilities.

— Christa Harrison, Therapist in Oklahoma City, OK

Life dishes out many changes for us (some we expect and plan for, some we never see coming), and it can be a struggle to adjust to the new normal. Some examples of life transitions include: moving away from home, job loss, marriage, questioning one's gender identity, serious illness, starting a new job, having a baby, etc. All of these events afford us the opportunity to reexamine our present way of being and to process with supportive, objective guidance can be so beneficial.

— Dr. Dana Avey, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Colorado Springs, CO
 

I provide my clients with hands-on practical tools to use during their life transitions, whether it be a divorce, major medical procedure, death of a loved one, breakup, career change, or other life change.

— Montrella Cowan, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Washington, DC

Major life transitions don't have to begin and end with suffering. Transitions give you the opportunity to assess what is working and what is not working, to get in touch with who you are and who you want to be. To consciously decide what you would like your life to look like and design your future. There is much potential when a major transition shakes up your world, but it can be difficult to harness this power when you are in the midst of pain.

— Christina Wall, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Lake Oswego, OR
 

Life transitions…we all go through them (yay and sigh), and many of my clients report difficulty navigating the tangled web of mixed feelings. How is it that something so good can conjure up feelings of anxiety, frustration, overwhelm, or stress? And how is it that something so bad or icky can conjure feelings of relief? How do you tackle such a conundrum? Yep, I’ve been there too. Along the way I’ve found that the process of working through or into a life transition is different each one of my clients (and me too). The good news… there are manageable ways to navigate and make sense of your unique situation.

— Sheila Tucker, Counselor in Hilton Head Island, SC

I consider this focus an opportunity to take a developmental approach. There are certain challenges we begin seeking at “normal” times in our lives, that result in some drastic transition states. I seek to look at a person’s life story and hear where the interruptions took place in their development, giving us a guide for what tasks may need recuperation, and what new challenges are on the horizon. I’m always pleased to zoom out to the big picture of life, as we see so often focused in tight.

— Ginelle Krummey, Counselor in Asheville, NC
 

Midlife issues, women's issues, marriage, illness, divorce, parenting.

— Lisa Langstraat, Counselor in Newberg, OR

So much of our confidence and purpose comes from our identity- and if you're making a big shift, you can find that confidence dwindling. In therapy, we'll help you find your steadiness as you navigate this new chapter.

— Abigail Thompson, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco, CA
 

I help my clients deal with the anxiety or depression that is associated with changes that occur in their life, relationships, parenting, and careers.

— Latisha Taylor Ellis, Licensed Professional Counselor in Cumming, GA

Changes in our life come in all types - some we choose, some we don't. Questioning who we are, having to re-prioritize our lives, and learning to move on are all aspects of change. I can help you to take a mindfulness approach to your life which lets you to look at the changes and your responses differently. You can learn to look at your thoughts and not let them determine your behavior.

— Melody Jones, Associate Professional Counselor in Centennial, CO

Working through struggles often is the pathway to a new and better you. Whatever you are going through, if you handle the situation properly you can use it as leverage to make your life better. I am here to help you see yourself, the role you are playing in your life and the one you could be. It's not a dress rehearsal. If you aren't getting the results you want you need to try a different approach.

— Tracy Braden, Counselor in Portland, OR
 

Are you struggling with a major life transition? Relationship break-ups, the loss of a loved one or a job, moving to a new town, or being diagnosed with an illness are all changes that can affect us deeply. Often, skills we have developed to cope no longer work. By holding space if you need to grieve losses, support you to explore behavior patterns that may be in your way, or brainstorm solutions to problems, I can help you let go of what was lost, and develop new perspectives for your life.

— Claudia Hartke, Psychologist in Boulder, CO
 

Life transitions such as moving, changing jobs, or experiencing a significant loss can be difficult for anyone. With change, sometimes comes a fear of the unknown. I help clients develop a sense of being able to handle anything that may come their way, expected or unexpected.

— Matianna Baldassari, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Santa Monica, CA
 

I enjoy helping people through all sorts of life transitions, and the stress that can come up around that.

— Risha Nathan, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in New York, NY

Working through struggles often is the pathway to a new and better you. Whatever you are going through, if you handle the situation properly you can use it as leverage to make your life better. I am here to help you see yourself, the role you are playing in your life and the one you could be. It's not a dress rehearsal. If you aren't getting the results you want you need to try a different approach.

— Tracy Braden, Counselor in Portland, OR
 

Life transitions are a normal part of life. I think that makes it especially difficult to seek help if we we are having difficulty in this area. We feel something is wrong with us if we’re feeling uneasy or struggling with a transition, such as getting married, moving , starting a new career , getting ready for our children to go to off college and many more. The truth is , most of us do struggle with these changes and transitions in our lives. Let’s talk it out 🙂

— Lisa Fulfor, Clinical Social Worker in Plano, TX

Divorce, retirement, death, new career, empty nest, even buying or selling a house are just a few examples of life’s transitions that can leave you feeling preoccupied, stressed, worried, exhausted or overwhelmed. Adjustments are a part of everyone’s life and some changes are easier than others to adapt to. Trying to be the perfect parent, spouse, adult child, co-worker, friend is leaving you feeling exhausted and overwhelmed and you wonder why you are not living up to your own standards. You don’t have to blame yourself or wonder, “What is wrong with me?”. Stop beating yourself up. Let’s work together and to explore your feelings, receive support, discover your strengths and develop new strategies to help you understand, cope and accept the transitions of your authentic life with positivity. Stop feeling like an “Imposter” and start finding self-acceptance.

— Allison Glorioso, Mental Health Counselor in Fort Myers, FL
 

Change through therapy should not only involve self-understanding and insight into the past, but should also focus on helping clients to learn skills for present-time challenges. My approach helps clients to develop specific tools and skills for thinking and acting in constructive, healthy ways.

— Kirsten Lesch, Counselor in Skaneateles, NY

Life transitions can include, but is not limited to: Career Changes Geographic Changes (expats) Deciding to stay or leave a relationship Role Change (new parent, single, retired) College transition Relationship changes Pet Loss/Grief Gender/sexual identity exploration

— Rachael Lastoff, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Newport, KY
 

Times have changed. There is no longer a prescribed life plan for you. It is now typical for individuals in their 20-30s to ask the questions “Who am I?” and “What do I want my life to look like?” These shifts have reflected significant changes in how you might relate to the world around you and how others in society view you. With these shifts a certain amount of anxiety and grief is expected. However, when you feel overwhelmed or underprepared to face the stress of a transition, more serious symptoms of anxiety and depression may develop and affect mood, motivation, and decision-making skills. These types of issues can affect your social, emotional, and physical well-being and make it difficult for you to develop or sustain meaningful relationships and to work toward educational and occupational goals. I am trained to help you become more aware of your emotional responses to these challenges and help you recognize problematic relational patterns and new ways to cope.

— Shannon Gonter, Counselor in Louisville, KY

Many of us reach out when we feel the need for support, or help working through challenging times. Sometimes we face challenges we think are too difficult to manage alone. I believe in taking a strength-based, client-centered approach to psychotherapy, working with you to help you grow toward your best self. The familiar ways you have of dealing with life's complications may not be working; together we can work to identify new positive means of change.

— Barton Shulman, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in San Francisco, CA
 

Are you a college student struggling to manage expectations and responsibilities? Feeling depressed or anxious? Questioning your sexuality, gender, or life path? You may be on your own for the first time in your life, or feeling challenged by living with your parents. I can help you find your own sense of clarity and direction, in a nonjudgmental manner that honors your true self. We can improve your relationship and boundary setting skills, or explore patterns that may lead you to success.

— Sabrina Merz, Counselor in Boulder, CO

As an individual, couple and family systems therapist I specialize in transitions across the life cycle. My NW DC based private practice offers counseling and support for: individual adults couples interfaith couples co-parents new parents families parents teens and young adults parents and families and their transgender/gender questioning children, teens and young adults counseling and coaching for psychotherapists

— Jennifer Kogan, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Washington, DC
 

Change is scary. Staying in the familiar, if unfulfilling, can stunt our ability to experience happiness. It takes courage to reach beyond what may no longer be working and search for more. This could be related to many issues including leaving or entering a relationship, starting a new job, becoming a new parent, exploring sexual orientation and facing life after losing a partner. I can help you explore the fear of change as well as the anxiety about what may come next for you in your life.

— Joan Tibaldi, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Saint Augustine, FL

It's not a question of if transitions will occur, they are a fact of everyone's life. What stands in the way of making the most of a transition that ultimately benefits us, is figuring out how to step out of our own way. In my work, I look at the thoughts that hold you back from stepping into opportunity. From making a choice that your inner wisdom is nudging you to step into, but your thoughts are getting in the way, holding you back.

— Joanne Royer, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Pasadena, CA
 

The inevitable losses and regrets of midlife — the close of a career, the death of a parent, widowhood, divorce or the onset of chronic medical problems bring their own challenges in part because they trigger a lot of old stuff that might not have been dealt with. Midlife is all about managing change without letting it overwhelm you. Kids leave the nest, parents die, your own health declines or maybe you lose your job in a round of layoffs. It can all leave you feeling at sea. Even positive changes — retirement or the birth of a first grandchild, for example — can be stressful in ways you may not expect. Professional counseling could help you sort it all out, even if you’ve never considered it before. When life happens to people in their 50s and 60s, it just hits much harder. It really seems to activate a desire to get meaning out of that event.

— Radmila Hollnagel, Licensed Professional Counselor in Charlotte, NC
 

Transition is hard. Whether it's college to career, single to married, married to divorced or empty nest, we all experience transitions throughout our lives. It's okay to feel lost or scared, confused or sad. With experience leading Divorce Care and experience with the Prepare/Enrich assessments for marriage and pre-marital counseling we will work together so that you can achieve the personal growth you are looking for.

— Lisa Dyck, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Westlake Village, CA
 

Our lives involve many transitions related to couple or marital relationships, family, parenting, education, work, jobs, careers, health, retirement, aging and death. Life transitions always involve grieving the loss of what was and the uncertainty of a new beginning. Throughout my life I have worked with clients in therapy and my consulting work that are navigating toward something new in their personal and work lives.

— M. Douglas Evans, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Ann Arbor, MI

Transitions are like flowers blooming – emerging sometimes against odds, blossoming gradually through small and subtle changes, and beautiful at every stage of unfolding.

— Renee Randazzo, Counselor in Austin, TX
 

Pain and growth often accompany one another. Research shows it’s the quality of support we get in difficult times that determines our degree of resilience. So whether you’re dealing with or adjusting to shifts related to work, relationships, grief/loss, health/medical status, political climate, beliefs/spirituality, and/or something else I’ve not named here, let’s navigate our way through it together. You’re not alone.

— Angela Doss, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA

I am especially skilled at working with young women who are navigating the transitions that come with life as a young adult. Many of my clients are figuring out next steps in career, education, relationships and life in general.

— Rachel Ladov, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Austin, TX
 

As a school counselor working in high schools for the past 10+ years, I specialize in working with high school seniors and college freshmen who are having difficulties moving forward in their lives. As a society, we offer very little acknowledgment of this important stage in the lives of our young people. There is no ritual, other than the graduation ceremony, to mark the transition from one stage to another. It is vital for us to begin to hold space for our children, so they have a space to discuss their fears about moving on to college or into the unknown world of work. Many of them struggle with this and simply 'go through the motions' often ending up at colleges they are not a good match for, on a career path that does not suite their unique talents or are in a space where they have yet to develop those talents and feel guilty or left behind as a result.

— Tiffany Ashe, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Durham, NC

Helping people through life changes is one of my passions. People often come to me hurting and confused following a break-up or struggling with handling chronic pain or life changes. Even good change can be hard change, and I approach this work from a perspective of helping you find your values and your voice. I can help you can find hope and direction through the most difficult storms.

— Lisa Hedden, Counselor in Tucker, GA
 

Ahhh....Adulting. Are you struggling to figure out your direction as an adult after years of knowing exactly what you "should" be doing? The rules for Adulting seem to be hidden away somewhere that no one knows! You thought it would be exciting, and it can be, but you had no idea how lonely and confused you would feel. As crazy as it sounds, this can be a wonderful time to learn more about yourself– what makes you tick, what do you really want for your life, and where are you stuck? Life these days moves at the speed of light. Life transitions seem to come a lot more frequently than they used to, and they can hit us by surprise. We go through life transitions after getting into long-term committed relationships, after having kids, raising teenagers (don't get me started!), and again when the kids leave home (or mostly leave...). These are all terrific times for personal growth! We can sort through the crazy feelings ("I love it–I hate it!") and find a path to growth and joy.

— Amy McManus, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA

Giving yourself permission to explore who you are opens the door to new possibilities and gives you the freedom to embark on the closest version of life you’ve always imagined. You can never be for certain as to which way your life will go, but you can control how you live your life. Therapy can help guide you into the spaces you imagine yourself being, as well as help you to make sense of what it is you want to do; even when you’re unsure of what you want to do with your life.

— Victoria Wantuck, Counselor in Seattle, WA
 

Life transitions are about learning to acknowledge adversities that are outside of our control. When we cannot change our external circumstances, REBT helps us to change ourselves by adapting to our situation and therefore transforming our perspective. This may be challenging and frustrating at first, but once change is truly achieved, it can result in a deep and profound shift of our philosophical world view, leading to a much more rational, mindful, and psychologically enlightened life!

— Jaclyn Hall, Registered Mental Health Counselor Intern in Tampa, FL

Times have changed. There is no longer a prescribed life plan for you. It is now typical for individuals in their 20-30s to ask the questions “Who am I?” and “What do I want my life to look like?” These shifts have reflected significant changes in how you might relate to the world around you and how others in society view you. With these shifts a certain amount of anxiety and grief is expected. However, when you feel overwhelmed or underprepared to face the stress of a transition, more serious symptoms of anxiety and depression may develop and affect mood, motivation, and decision-making skills. These types of issues can affect your social, emotional, and physical well-being and make it difficult for you to develop or sustain meaningful relationships and to work toward educational and occupational goals. I am trained to help you become more aware of your emotional responses to these challenges and help you recognize problematic relational patterns and new ways to cope.

— Shannon Gonter, Counselor in Louisville, KY
 

Let’s just be honest. Life is messy and full of unexpected surprises. We are expected to juggle a plethora of things, all the while maintaining balance and overall well-being. A lot of times, that is not the way it works out. At Mindful Counseling, we strive to meet each person where they are at, identifying concerns for them and creating a unique plan to help them reach their goals.

— Mindful Counseling PLLC, Counselor in Denton, TX
 

Through my internship in 2016 to the present I have been walking along side clients who are going through life transitions. Coming from a systems perspective allow us to process the emotions that are coming up when change occurs. Life transitions can be a broad category, and through building a relationship, the transition can be processed in an open way. I have had the honor of working with many clients, as well as taking many trainings on changes that occur with int he family.

— PeriAnne VanBelois, Counselor in Grand Rapids, MI

Are you feeling frustrated, blocked, burned out, and desperately wanting to grow beyond to a bigger vision for yourself and your contribution to the world? Perhaps your calling is coming in the form of anxiety, pain/tension, panic, or depression in the present and you are seeking support finding what's next. Or perhaps you know where you're headed, and you don't want to repeat the past. Therapy is a place where you can learn to listen more deeply to and honor what can bring you joy and fulfillment. I work with you in mind and body to connect to what is true to you, relationally to support you finding new ways of bringing yourself to the world, and with attention to the what matters to you. Each stage of growth is an opportunity for healing.

— Eveline Wu, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Oakland, CA

Utilizing my intuitive ability to see the bigger picture of life transitions that my clients are experiencing, I am able to help them understand their transitions and the roadblocks that are preventing them from being able to move forward and flow through life.

— Crystal Deichert, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Aurora, CO

Maybe something unexpected recently happened in your life. Maybe it’s thrown you for a loop and you’re not quite sure how to navigate through. Transitions serve as an opportunity to explore wants and needs, enter a new stage and to take a step toward living a more fulfilling and authentic life. With the right help and support, and your willingness to self-explore, you can respond to change, experience profound growth, and create a better, richer, and more satisfying life.

— James Killian, Licensed Professional Counselor in Woodbridge, CT

Break ups, moving, changing to a new job or career, beginning a PhD program, retirement, etc; all of these life changes can leave us swirling with all kinds of emotions no matter how much we've experienced. I'll work with you to assess the impact, identify where it originates, and collaborate with you in strengthening existing tools and skills (or finding new ones!) to cope with present changes and (hopefully), improve your ability to face the next one.

— Hilda Lopez, Associate Professional Clinical Counselor in Berkeley, CA
 

I work with clients to assist in typical and atypical life stages and processes. Some need my teamwork in journeying with them as they explore their career identity and purpose, then adjust, modify and recreate it over time. Some want my help in the beginning or ending of a relationship, or assistance in helping relationships become more loving and stable. Some clients need help defining their personal identity and presenting that to the world with their clothing and home design choices.

— Laurie Cape, Licensed Professional Counselor in Bowling Green, KY

Changes in jobs, employment status, moving cities, entering or leaving a relationship. These are all common life transitions that can cause stress, anxiety and depression. I specialize in working with women who are experiencing high levels of stress and/or anxiety due to a recent life transition or traumatic event.

— Gwendolyn Nelson-Terry, Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco, CA
 

Transitions are challenging. Big moves, career changes, unexpected break-ups, new children, and all kinds of other events can make big waves in a person's life. It can make you feel like you've lost your footing for a while. You deserve guidance. Whether you've had a big transition or are thinking about one, I imagine you could use some support at this time. Maybe you need grounding, mental clarity around a decision, or empowerment to stand up and ask for what you deserve.

— Natalie Moore, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Pasadena, CA

Many of us reach out when we feel the need for support, or help working through challenging times. Sometimes we face challenges we think are too difficult to manage alone. I believe in taking a strength-based, client-centered integrative approach to psychotherapy, working with you to help you grow toward your best self. The familiar ways you have of dealing with life's complications may not be working; together we can work to identify new positive means of change.

— Barton Shulman, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in San Francisco, CA

Are you wondering how you got where you are? Are you confused about how to live in a strange world that wants you to behave like other people when you just want to be you? Did you finally realize that our culture lied to you when it said just be a good person and it'll all work out? There are countless transitions in life. Some of your own making and some that come with being alive. I can help you with any of them. Our culture doesn't teach us how to live. Therapy teaches that.

— Eddie Reece, Licensed Professional Counselor in Alpharetta, GA
 

Major life transitions don't have to begin and end with suffering. Transitions give you the opportunity to assess what is working and what is not working, to get in touch with who you are and who you want to be. To consciously decide what you would like your life to look like and design your future. There is much potential when a major transition shakes up your world, but it can be difficult to harness this power when you are in the midst of pain.

— Christina Wall, Licensed Professional Counselor Intern in Lake Oswego, OR

Are you wondering how you got where you are? Are you confused about how to live in a strange world that wants you to behave like other people when you just want to be you? Did you finally realize that our culture lied to you when it said just be a good person and it'll all work out? There are countless transitions in life. Some of your own making and some that come with being alive. I can help you with any of them. Our culture doesn't teach us how to live. Therapy teaches that.

— Eddie Reece, Licensed Professional Counselor in Alpharetta, GA

Sometimes we come to points in our lives where the stories we've been living about who we are and how our lives are supposed to unfold no longer fit. Sometimes this happens because of a loss or major life event. Sometimes it's just part of getting older. Sometimes what was working well for a long time suddenly no longer works, and we can't really pinpoint why. I collaborate with people in developing new frameworks that can support them as they figure out where to go next.

— Kathryn Stinson, Counselor in St. Louis, MO

Anxiety and Depression ADHD support Trauma and Abuse Family or friends of those diagnosed with personality disorders Bipolar Disorder Infertility Grief and Loss Stress Reduction Life transitions Couples and other relational struggles Empty Nest and Midlife struggles Mindfulness Skills

— Gwen Kinney, Counselor in Austin, TX
 

The inevitable losses and regrets of midlife — the close of a career, the death of a parent, widowhood, divorce or the onset of chronic medical problems bring their own challenges in part because they trigger a lot of old stuff that might not have been dealt with. Midlife is all about managing change without letting it overwhelm you. Kids leave the nest, parents die, your own health declines or maybe you lose your job in a round of layoffs. It can all leave you feeling at sea. Even positive changes — retirement or the birth of a first grandchild, for example — can be stressful in ways you may not expect. Professional counseling could help you sort it all out, even if you’ve never considered it before. When life happens to people in their 50s and 60s, it just hits much harder. It really seems to activate a desire to get meaning out of that event. Midlife “is like going through adolescence again, you’re trying to figure out who you are.”

— Radmila Hollnagel, Licensed Professional Counselor in Charlotte, NC
 

I have years of experience working with individuals from all walks of life to address transitions- good and bad. From career changes, to family changes, to mental health recovery, and more. Together we will explore ways to develop coping strategies that are comfortable for you. If you've been feeling blocked by something, hang in there, we will work to find solutions. Sometimes we need permission to say, "I'm not doing well." I'm here to say- we can do this!

— Sheilagh McGreal, Creative Art Therapist in Rochester,
 

The inevitable losses and regrets of midlife — the close of a career, the death of a parent, widowhood, divorce or the onset of chronic medical problems bring their own challenges in part because they trigger a lot of old stuff that might not have been dealt with. Midlife is all about managing change without letting it overwhelm you. Kids leave the nest, parents die, your own health declines or maybe you lose your job in a round of layoffs. It can all leave you feeling at sea. Even positive changes — retirement or the birth of a first grandchild, for example — can be stressful in ways you may not expect. Professional counseling could help you sort it all out, even if you’ve never considered it before. When life happens to people in their 50s and 60s, it just hits much harder. It really seems to activate a desire to get meaning out of that event. Midlife “is like going through adolescence again, you’re trying to figure out who you are.”

— Radmila Hollnagel, Licensed Professional Counselor in Charlotte, NC
 

Times have changed. There is no longer a prescribed life plan for you. It is now typical for individuals in their 20-30s to ask the questions “Who am I?” and “What do I want my life to look like?” These shifts have reflected significant changes in how you might relate to the world around you and how others in society view you. With these shifts a certain amount of anxiety and grief is expected. However, when you feel overwhelmed or underprepared to face the stress of a transition, more serious symptoms of anxiety and depression may develop and affect mood, motivation, and decision-making skills. These types of issues can affect your social, emotional, and physical well-being and make it difficult for you to develop or sustain meaningful relationships and to work toward educational and occupational goals. I am trained to help you become more aware of your emotional responses to these challenges and help you recognize problematic relational patterns and new ways to cope.

— Shannon Gonter, Counselor in Louisville, KY
 

Many individuals I have worked with are struggling through a life transition of some sort. I find that it is helpful to sit with others during tough times, rather than taking that burden on yourself. Many clients I see are going through transitions of aging, death, job relocation, relationship transitions and many others.

— Miranda Bayard-Clark, Licensed Professional Counselor in Lake Oswego, OR

Individuals in our society are experiencing more changes than ever before. Whether it's moving to college, changing your profession, or navigating a break-up, transitions have a tendency to exacerbate our worries and worsen our moods. By applying techniques from DBT and SFBT, I will help you better tolerate the distress that arises from change, identify coping skills that work best for you, and strengthen the resilience you already have within.

— Saira Malhotra, Therapist in Denver, CO
 

Humans, in general, struggle to cope with change. We are creatures of habit. So, it’s no surprise that some of the most stressful events in our lives are changes. Changes such as divorce, separation or marital reconciliation, job loss, retirement, imprisonment, career moves, crises, coming out, and empty nest syndrome can have a profound impact on our overall mental wellbeing. If you have recently gone through a major life change, and you need help coping and adjusting to your new reality, I ca

— Elizabeth Harles, Counselor in Raleigh, NC

I have worked with individuals that need help with the transitions of life for numerous years. I help them become equipped with the adequate skills to help the transition be as smooth as possible.

— Tiffany Price, Counselor in MIDWEST CITY, OK
 

“When one door closes another door opens; but we so often look so long and so regretfully upon the closed door, that we do not see the ones which open for us.” – Alexander Graham Bell. I help you to identify what you had and that which you are letting go. I help you to celebrate what was, what you learned. Then we will work on decreasing the confusion of the unknown. This is often the most difficult and longest time. The more work you do in this area the closer to the new beginning you will get.

— Kathleen Nelson, Therapist in Ann Arbor, MI