Life transitions

Change is hard, even in the best of circumstances and adjusting to major life transitions, even when they are positive, can be difficult. Whether you are getting married, moving, changing jobs, having a child – or any of the other many transitions we can expect as part of life – coping and navigating the stress of a major change can cause depression and anxiety, among other issues. If you are having trouble with accepting or adjusting to life transition, a qualified mental health professional can help you find healthy ways of coping. Rach out to one of TherapyDen’s life transition experts today. 

Meet the specialists

Working through struggles often is the pathway to a new and better you. Whatever you are going through, if you handle the situation properly you can use it as leverage to make your life better. I am here to help you see yourself, the role you are playing in your life and the one you could be. It's not a dress rehearsal. If you aren't getting the results you want you need to try a different approach.

— Tracy Braden, Counselor in Portland, OR
 

Many of us reach out when we feel the need for support, or help working through challenging times. Sometimes we face challenges we think are too difficult to manage alone. I believe in taking a strength-based, client-centered approach to psychotherapy, working with you to help you grow toward your best self. The familiar ways you have of dealing with life's complications may not be working; together we can work to identify new positive means of change.

— Barton Shulman, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in San Francisco, CA
 

I really enjoy helping people navigate changes and transitions in their lives, whether that is graduating, going to college, marriage, divorce, loss of job, moving. I understand that it doesn't need to be a specifically negative change to create stress and unease. I've worked with high school and college students, parents of kids with disabilities, women leaving abusive or toxic relationships, young adults navigating life out of college, and young professionals navigating career transitions.

— Sarah Fink, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Boston, MA
 

Research suggests that continuing difficulties – long-term unemployment, living in an abusive or uncaring relationship, long-term isolation, prolonged work stress – are likely to cause mental health concerns. However, recent events (such as losing your job) or a combination of events can ‘trigger’ problems if you’re already at risk because of previous bad experiences or personal factors. I use a technique called Brainspotting to help you quickly uncover and reorient yourself.

— Shawn Hales, Psychologist in Towson, MD

Times have changed. There is no longer a prescribed life plan for you. It is now typical for individuals in their 20-30s to ask the questions “Who am I?” and “What do I want my life to look like?” These shifts have reflected significant changes in how you might relate to the world around you and how others in society view you. With these shifts a certain amount of anxiety and grief is expected. However, when you feel overwhelmed or underprepared to face the stress of a transition, more serious symptoms of anxiety and depression may develop and affect mood, motivation, and decision-making skills. These types of issues can affect your social, emotional, and physical well-being and make it difficult for you to develop or sustain meaningful relationships and to work toward educational and occupational goals. I am trained to help you become more aware of your emotional responses to these challenges and help you recognize problematic relational patterns and new ways to cope.

— Shannon Gonter, Counselor in Louisville, KY
 

I have years of experience working with individuals from all walks of life to address transitions- good and bad. From career changes, to family changes, to mental health recovery, and more. Together we will explore ways to develop coping strategies that are comfortable for you. If you've been feeling blocked by something, hang in there, we will work to find solutions. Sometimes we need permission to say, "I'm not doing well." I'm here to say- we can do this!

— Sheilagh McGreal, Creative Art Therapist in Rochester,

Change is scary. Staying in the familiar, if unfulfilling, can stunt our ability to experience happiness. It takes courage to reach beyond what may no longer be working and search for more. This could be related to many issues including leaving or entering a relationship, starting a new job, becoming a new parent, exploring sexual orientation and facing life after losing a partner. I can help you explore the fear of change as well as the anxiety about what may come next for you in your life.

— Joan Tibaldi, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Saint Augustine, FL
 

Change is a vehicle for growth, and growing pains can be difficult to manage. Many of us try to hide that we are struggling because we believe we should have it all together. Sometimes there's a pressure to be elated when we graduate, get engaged, have a baby, change jobs, etc. The truth is that grief for what was and fear of what could be often accompany the joy of major life events. I work with individuals to develop skills to ride the waves of change and rediscover their greatest self.

— Stephanie Renny, Counselor in Cincinnati, OH
 

I consider this focus an opportunity to take a developmental approach. There are certain challenges we begin seeking at “normal” times in our lives, that result in some drastic transition states. I seek to look at a person’s life story and hear where the interruptions took place in their development, giving us a guide for what tasks may need recuperation, and what new challenges are on the horizon. I’m always pleased to zoom out to the big picture of life, as we see so often focused in tight.

— Ginelle Krummey, Counselor in Asheville, NC

Our lives involve many transitions related to couple or marital relationships, family, parenting, education, work, jobs, careers, health, retirement, aging and death. Life transitions always involve grieving the loss of what was and the uncertainty of a new beginning. Throughout my life I have worked with clients in therapy and my consulting work that are navigating toward something new in their personal and work lives.

— M. Douglas Evans, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Ann Arbor, MI
 

Are you wondering how you got where you are? Are you confused about how to live in a strange world that wants you to behave like other people when you just want to be you? Did you finally realize that our culture lied to you when it said just be a good person and it'll all work out? There are countless transitions in life. Some of your own making and some that come with being alive. I can help you with any of them. Our culture doesn't teach us how to live. Therapy teaches that.

— Eddie Reece, Licensed Professional Counselor in Alpharetta, GA

Many individuals I have worked with are struggling through a life transition of some sort. I find that it is helpful to sit with others during tough times, rather than taking that burden on yourself. Many clients I see are going through transitions of aging, death, job relocation, relationship transitions and many others.

— Miranda Bayard-Clark, Licensed Professional Counselor in Lake Oswego, OR
 

Life changing events and transitions can cause so many different and uncomfortable emotions to come to the surface. Perhaps there are changes in your family, work, relationships, health or home life. Sometimes these are planned and sometimes they are unexpected but either way, they can bring uncertainty, concern and worry to your life. Learning how to adjust to new situations takes time, understanding, patience and support. I am that person to help you transition to this new part of your life.

— Jan Nelson, Therapist in NEW YORK, NY

Times have changed. There is no longer a prescribed life plan for you. It is now typical for individuals in their 20-30s to ask the questions “Who am I?” and “What do I want my life to look like?” These shifts have reflected significant changes in how you might relate to the world around you and how others in society view you. With these shifts a certain amount of anxiety and grief is expected. However, when you feel overwhelmed or underprepared to face the stress of a transition, more serious symptoms of anxiety and depression may develop and affect mood, motivation, and decision-making skills. These types of issues can affect your social, emotional, and physical well-being and make it difficult for you to develop or sustain meaningful relationships and to work toward educational and occupational goals. I am trained to help you become more aware of your emotional responses to these challenges and help you recognize problematic relational patterns and new ways to cope.

— Shannon Gonter, Counselor in Louisville, KY