Job Stress

Our jobs and careers are an important part of our daily lives and can bring us a sense of connection, accomplishment and fulfillment. However, jobs – even dream jobs – can also be incredibly stressful. And ongoing, unmanaged job stress puts your physical and mental health at risk. Job stress can be caused by any number of things, including impossible deadlines, a lack of resources, relationships with your co-workers or supervisor, long hours, job insecurity, high pressure situations and a lack of control. However, no matter what is causing your job stress, there are steps you can take to protect yourself from its damaging effects. A qualified professional therapist can help you identify the stressors, improve your job satisfaction, and foster your well-being in and out of the workplace. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s job stress experts today.

Meet the specialists

In providing workplace consultation and training businesses, I have determined a huge source of stress is when someone takes something personally and starts dwelling on what someone said or did (or neglected to say or do.) As you can imagine this can greatly affect productivity. Because rejection and taking things personally are my expertise, I can be helpful in helping clients strategize how best to navigate these hurtful situations. Another frequent workplace stressor is when someone has an expectation that they did not communicate clearly and they are passed by for a project or promotion. When I know about the client's desire, I can ask, "Have you told your manager yet what you want?" The answer is too often, "No, I'm sure they know I want that project." This is another situation of 'If you care about me, you'll read my mind.' It can only lead to hurtful and stressful disappointment. And learning how to clearly say "no" is an important skill to avoid workplace stress.

— Elayne Savage, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Berkeley, CA
 

In my work, both as a therapist and as a organizational consultant, I have witnessed the stressors people face as employees and as managers or leaders of organizations. Personal and work stressors are intertwined and often the result of trying to keep up with unrealistic responsibilities and expectations rather than having a more realistic understanding of what can be done.

— M. Douglas Evans, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Ann Arbor, MI

Learning to have difficult conversations in the workplace may require learning new skills in communication. These difficult conversations can lead to better job assignments/roles and also to greater recognition of your contribution in the workplace. These skills often translate into better relationships in your "real life" as well.

— Andrea Rogers, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Los Angeles, CA
 

Job stress can occur because a work environment is toxic or simply a poor fit for a particular person's strengths, personality, interests, and values. I help clients to make decisions that are right for them and to implement strategic change.

— Janet Civitelli, Psychologist in Austin, TX

Whether you are experiencing feelings of anxiety or depression as a result of your circumstances, our therapists can help. All of our therapists utilize evidence based therapies including Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), mindfulness, Narrative therapy and Acceptance-Commitment Therapy (ACT).

— Acuity Counseling, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Seattle, WA
 

I worked for several years helping hospital workers sort through the stress that comes from long hours and lots of responsibility. I have a passion for helping people learn how to enjoy their jobs again and re-ignite the passion they once had (or find a new passion if necessary!) I love helping my clients find work-life balance and learn where they need to focus their attention to take better care of their health and happiness.

— Ashley Hamm, Licensed Professional Counselor in Houston, TX