Job Stress

Our jobs and careers are an important part of our daily lives and can bring us a sense of connection, accomplishment and fulfillment. However, jobs – even dream jobs – can also be incredibly stressful. And ongoing, unmanaged job stress puts your physical and mental health at risk. Job stress can be caused by any number of things, including impossible deadlines, a lack of resources, relationships with your co-workers or supervisor, long hours, job insecurity, high pressure situations and a lack of control. However, no matter what is causing your job stress, there are steps you can take to protect yourself from its damaging effects. A qualified professional therapist can help you identify the stressors, improve your job satisfaction, and foster your well-being in and out of the workplace. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s job stress experts today.

Meet the specialists

You thrive on the challenge and you love the feeling of success. You’re excited to take on bigger challenges and more responsibility. And the pay is pretty nice too. But… You’re too busy for hobbies or deep friendships. When you get home, you’re too wiped to enjoy anything. Your relationship is feeling the strain. You're constantly in reactive mode. I can help you find a way to find immediate relief, and then regroup and find a better, more balanced way to move forward and enjoy life again.

— Gretta Duleba, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Seattle, WA
 

I also specialize in using CBT for treating job and career stress, including executive leadership stress, imposter syndrome, burnout, work relationship problems, adjustment difficulties, career dissatisfaction, workaholism/work addiction, performance problems, and other struggles that may arise for employees, entrepreneurs, leaders, business executives.

— Ross Nelson, Clinical Psychologist in San Francisco, CA

Sometimes burnout can get the best of us. You may be excellent at what you do, but the constant demands of your career take a toll. You may feel dissatisfied and underappreciated for all the hard work you put in. As a certified Kundalini yoga teacher, I understand the importance of self-care in the face of stress. I aid clients in finding a passion that boosts their professional life and creates a strong life/work balance. I also have the capability to work with clients on mindfulness and yoga.

— Matianna Baldassari, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Santa Monica, CA
 

CBT and SFBT techniques are implemented with intent to significantly minimize job stress.

— Janelle Marshall, Licensed Professional Counselor in Houston, TX

I have spent over a decade studying human behavior, leadership, and performance enhancement. I utilize sport and performance psychology principles to help people overcome job-related stress. My master's thesis studied the cognitive, emotional, and behavioral correlates of performance excellence, and in private practice I help high-stress, high-risk, and healthcare professionals retake control over their lives.

— Ian Palombo, Licensed Professional Counselor in Denver, CO
 

Whether you are experiencing feelings of anxiety or depression as a result of your circumstances, our therapists can help. All of our therapists utilize evidence based therapies including Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), mindfulness, Narrative therapy and Acceptance-Commitment Therapy (ACT).

— Acuity Counseling, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Seattle, WA
 

In my work, both as a therapist and as a organizational consultant, I have witnessed the stressors people face as employees and as managers or leaders of organizations. Personal and work stressors are intertwined and often the result of trying to keep up with unrealistic responsibilities and expectations rather than having a more realistic understanding of what can be done.

— M. Douglas Evans, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Ann Arbor, MI

In providing workplace consultation and training businesses, I have determined a huge source of stress is when someone takes something personally and starts dwelling on what someone said or did (or neglected to say or do.) As you can imagine this can greatly affect productivity. Because rejection and taking things personally are my expertise, I can be helpful in helping clients strategize how best to navigate these hurtful situations. Another frequent workplace stressor is when someone has an expectation that they did not communicate clearly and they are passed by for a project or promotion. When I know about the client's desire, I can ask, "Have you told your manager yet what you want?" The answer is too often, "No, I'm sure they know I want that project." This is another situation of 'If you care about me, you'll read my mind.' It can only lead to hurtful and stressful disappointment. And learning how to clearly say "no" is an important skill to avoid workplace stress.

— Elayne Savage, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Berkeley, CA
 

You spend so much of your week at work. If you're miserable, it can start seeping into your relationships and what's happening at home. It is so important to find ways to manage your work life, so it doesn't negatively impact your home life. Job stress can come from so many different places - feeling incompetent, having too much to do, a toxic work environment, or being in the wrong position. Learn strategies to decrease the stress you feel at work.

— Katie Vernoy, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Torrance, CA

I also specialize in using CBT for helping people dealing with stress from their careers/job, including imposter syndrome, lack of satisfaction with career choices, relationship conflicts, performance related difficulties, workaholism/addiction, and other stressors that arise as a result of one's job.

— Ross Nelson, Clinical Psychologist in San Francisco, CA