Family Caregiving Stress

Providing ongoing care to a family member with chronic or disabling conditions can be incredibly difficult. Family caregiver stress occurs when a caregiver becomes so focused on the needs of their loved one (in this case a family member) that they aren't aware of their own well-being. Symptoms of caregiver stress include irregular sleep patterns, fluctuations in weight, and feeling overwhelmed, tired, irritable or constantly worried. To manage family caregiving stress, it can help to seek support from others that are in a similar situation (e.g. a support group), or work with a professional to practice self-care, set realistic goals, set boundaries, and learn to accept help. If you are experiencing the stress of caring for a family member, reach out to one of TherapyDen’s specialists today.

Meet the specialists

Caring for family is often one of the most stressful roles we can experience in our life. I have a background in working with older adults and family caregivers. Getting the support you need to maintain your identity, your personal goals and managing family relationships is critical to reducing caregiver stress. I use stress management and self-compassion skill building to build coping skills for caregivers.

— Jody Dearborn, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Seattle, WA
 

Often care giving for a loved one falls on one person. It is my hope to provide support to you as you manage and balance this. I have experience aiding those whose loves ones have chronic medical concerns, terminal illness, or mental health diagnoses.

— Monica Cagayat, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Bothell, WA

I have experience from my own life, as well as from assisting many clients through the stressors of caring for family members who are aging, ill, have dementia, or are in assisted living situations. I understand the unique pressures, conflicted feelings and overwhelmingness that can accompany these situations.

— Jill Christenson, Counselor
 

At this time, managing family stress and relational conflict has been hard on everyone. I can help support you and identify key strategies to feel more authentic and self-accepting as you care for others and manage family conflict.

— Rebecca Lavine, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Cambridge, MA

Being a caregiver to a sick family member or friend is highly stressful and taxing. Sometimes, there's a lot of guilt and conflicting g feelings involved.

— Ana Cristina Uribe, Licensed Clinical Social Worker
 

I know how hard it is to be a caregiver. I have been there. I understand. Sometimes you feel out of control because nothing you do seems like it's helping. Sometimes you feel like you need a break and there is no one around to help. And sometimes you feel like you have to minimize your own feelings and pains because you feel guilty since you are not the one with the chronic illness. I want you to know that you matter and I will support you through this difficult time.

— Elizabeth Cowell, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in San Diego, CA

Caring for a love one can be stressful. As a therapist I will utilize Cognitive Behavior Therapy and/or Solution Focused Therapy to provide tools to maximize each client’s potential while helping them cope and develop solutions to their problems.

— Shinah Russell, Licensed Professional Counselor in Tucker, GA
 

Being a caregiver to a sick family member or friend is highly stressful and taxing. Sometimes, there's a lot of guilt and conflicting g feelings involved.

— Ana Cristina Uribe, Licensed Clinical Social Worker

From caring for children to caring for parents and/or grandparents, I understand the immense amount of stress and demands that are put upon family caregivers. It can also be incredibly isolating. I provide therapy for family caregivers to help them cope with the challenging day to day and long term decisions and obligations that they face.

— Jilleen Jarrett, Psychotherapist in Granite Bay, CA
 

How can families not be stressed at this time! We can't change the world but we can lessen the chaos of our day to day living. If you are a parent and within a unit shifts can occur that keep you feeling safe and allow you to provide the feelings of safety for others which in turn brings an underlying calm.

— Liz Walker, Therapist

When you make tough life choices to care for children, a spouse, or parent, you may feel like you're entering into uncharted territory. Maybe you've changed jobs, stepped out of paid work, ended relationships, ended hobbies, moved, or are facing an identity change. I have done all these things, and felt unprepared for the stress of caregiving. I help with role-identity, self-care, boundary setting, feminism and social justice issues in family caregiving.

— Rachel Duncan, Licensed Professional Counselor Associate in Denver, CO
 

How can families not be stressed at this time! We can't change the world but we can lessen the chaos of our day to day living. If you are a parent and within a unit shifts can occur that keep you feeling safe and allow you to provide the feelings of safety for others which in turn brings an underlying calm.

— Liz Walker, Therapist

Self-Care, Self-Care, Self-Care, yadda yadda yadda. (VOM). It's about so much more than bubble-baths, y'all. Let's figure out where the stress is originating, and develop some REAL SKILLS for reducing/tolerating/managing/blasting it.

— Keri Smith Gaylord, Clinical Social Worker
 

Through my experience working with the geriatric community, I came to specialize in issues related to Alzheimer's Disease and memory issues. Caregiver stress, sundowners syndrome, agitation and anxiety surrounding the illness are all issues I have become familiar with.

— Lauren Riddles, Associate Clinical Social Worker in Los Angeles, CA

When your loved one is sick, their needs come first. You drop everything to try and find ways to keep them comfortable and safe. You want them to receive the best care possible and search for treatments and cures that will give you more time together or work to make your time together as “normal” as possible. Over time you may come to realize that things may never be normal again. The gift of caregiving can be complicated because it requires you to put your needs on hold. I can offer you support

— Claire Solu-Burd, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Chatham, NJ