Family Caregiving Stress

Providing ongoing care to a family member with chronic or disabling conditions can be incredibly difficult. Family caregiver stress occurs when a caregiver becomes so focused on the needs of their loved one (in this case a family member) that they aren't aware of their own well-being. Symptoms of caregiver stress include irregular sleep patterns, fluctuations in weight, and feeling overwhelmed, tired, irritable or constantly worried. To manage family caregiving stress, it can help to seek support from others that are in a similar situation (e.g. a support group), or work with a professional to practice self-care, set realistic goals, set boundaries, and learn to accept help. If you are experiencing the stress of caring for a family member, reach out to one of TherapyDen’s specialists today.

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I specialize in working with parents of infants with special medical needs, beginning in pregnancy with fetal diagnosis and through delivery. This includes neonatal hospitalization (NICU, CICU) and managing the transition home after hospitalization. I also provide support to parents of older children whether facing a new diagnosis or managing their child's chronic medical needs.

— Kate Christman, Clinical Social Worker in Decatur, GA

I am a single mother of an adult child with a significant developmental disability and I have served on our Governor appointed WA State Developmental Disabilities Council. In addition, I have counseled family caregivers during my time in community mental health.

— Kelly Hill, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Seattle, WA
 

Caregiving can be very draining. Without caring for oneself it is difficult to be effective in this demanding capacity.

— Caryn Warren, Addictions Counselor in Mesa, AZ

I am in a caregiver role in the world of developmental disabilities, I understand how isolating it can be and how exhausting it is to battle the system.

— Kelly Hill, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Seattle, WA
 

I've worked with Family caregivers during my work experience as a social worker in an elder abuse program, at an Alzheimer's disease organization and at an organization for individuals with Multiples Sclerosis. I also ran support groups and lead presentations about the stress of Family caregiving.

— Christine M. ValentĂ­n, Clinical Social Worker in Middlesex, NJ

Alzheimer's and chronic illnesses affect everyone in the family. Caregiver mental health is just as important as the health of the person with the illness. I have extensive experience working with both types of family members.

— Julie Kenworth, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Pasadena, CA
 

Caregiving can be very draining. Without caring for oneself it is difficult to be effective in this demanding capacity.

— Caryn Warren, Addictions Counselor in Mesa, AZ

Having experienced family caregiver stress and burnout firsthand I am very knowledgable in tools and practices to protect you and your self care practice. There are a lot of resources out there, and I am familiar with many of them. Would love to help you with coping with the daily stress of caregiving.

— Tara LaDue, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Pasadena, CA
 

Caregiving can be very draining. Without caring for oneself it is difficult to be effective in this demanding capacity.

— Caryn Warren, Addictions Counselor in Mesa, AZ

Many of my clients are adult children caring for a parent or a spouse caring for a spouse. Our work together can focus on grief, stress, decision-making, anxiety, pain, purpose, you name it. I am here for you and have supported over 100+ family caregivers throughout their experiences caring for a living family member as well as after the family member dies.

— Tamara Statz, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Saint Paul, MN
 

It has never been harder to be a parent or caregiver. If you navigate our healthcare system for yourself or for family, you may feel inadequately supported. I offer emotional support and resources to develop self-compassion, strengthen co-parenting and family ties, improve caregiver communication, strengthen self-care and community care, and maintain identity while caregiving. I have both personal experience as an adult child navigating a parent's diagnosis as well as professional tools.

— Arynn Prescott, Marriage and Family Therapist Associate in Seattle, WA

You try so hard to be there for your aging parent, as well as for your own family. No one seems to know struggle it is to balance these parts of your life. It's just expected that you will be there when your parent falls and is rushed to the ER. It's just expected that you will attend a daughter's soccer game, when all you really want to do is slip into a bath & then head to bed. You are exhausted. My name is Lisabeth Wotherspoon, and I help with Caregiver Burnout.

— Lisabeth Wotherspoon, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Rochester, NH
 

Taking care of all the necessities of a family can lead to stress and burnout. Caregivers often don't have time to process their own experiences, sort their thoughts, and make decisions that are in alignment with their values because their day-to-day is consumed with responsibilities. When caregivers have space for themselves, they are able to choose paths for themselves and their families that are more authentic and therefore sustainable. Caregivers' will-being is essential.

— Luisa Bakhoum, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor Associate

I am a certified case manager in addition to a clinical social worker with extensive healthcare and advocacy experience. I can help address caregiver stress and help you develop new coping skills to manage these transitions.

— Lisa Schneider, Clinical Social Worker in Goshen, NY
 

I specialize in working with parents of infants and children with special medical needs, including neonatal hospitalization (NICU, CICU) and managing the transition home after hospitalization. I also provide support to parents of older children, whether facing a new diagnosis or managing their child's chronic medical needs at home.

— Kate Christman, Clinical Social Worker in Decatur, GA

Being a caregiver to a sick family member or friend is highly stressful and taxing. Sometimes, there's a lot of guilt and conflicting g feelings involved.

— Ana Cristina Uribe, Licensed Clinical Social Worker
 

Often care giving for a loved one falls on one person. It is my hope to provide support to you as you manage and balance this. I have experience aiding those whose loves ones have chronic medical concerns, terminal illness, or mental health diagnoses.

— Monica Cagayat, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Bothell, WA