Emotional Eating

Emotional eating (sometimes called stress eating) involves using food to make yourself feel better. It is characterized by the act of eating to satisfy emotional needs, rather than to satisfy physical hunger. Food (either consciously or unconsciously) can be a source of comfort in stressful situations. Emotional eating is typically used as a way to numb negative emotions like fear, anger, boredom, loneliness or sadness.  Both major life events and the normal hassles of daily life can cause the types of negative emotions likely to trigger emotional eating. A therapist can help you understand the reasons behind your emotional eating and teach you tools to both recognize and cope with it. If you have been experiencing episodes of emotional eating, reach out to one of TherapyDen’s specialists today. 

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As a CBT therapist, I explain to the client that their binge eating is based on emotional reasoning, and, although eating might make them feel temporarily comforted, would not help them feel better about themselves. In fact, overeating usually has the opposite effect and actually makes them feel worse about themselves. Together, you and I will plan a different approach to handling disappointment. With practice, you will be able to interpret people’s responses more realistically, so you are not constantly feeling inadequate. We will also work on improving your self-esteem. As your self-esteem improves, you became more able to refrain from snacking and binging and began to eat more nutritious food.

— Amy Castongia, Counselor in Huntersville, NC

I have worked with many clients over my years in practice with issues related to emotional/disordered eating. Disordered eating is a metaphor for what is unspoken.Together we will look at the purpose the emotional eating serves for you and what is going on in your life that the eating may be expressing. By exploring the stressors in your life we can look at those underlying causes, give them a voice and help you work toward resolving them in a healthy manner.

— Joan Tibaldi, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Saint Augustine, FL
 

I work with individuals who are experiencing stress-related/emotional eating and the negative consequences of overweight or obesity. I have training in the most current, evidenced-based methods for promoting healthy lifestyle changes. My approach is behavioral, and I also incorporate mindfulness and acceptance-based strategies. I also work with individuals pre- and post- bariatric surgery. I am accepting of people of all weights and sizes in my approach.

— Sala Psychology, Clinical Psychologist in Greenwich, CT

As a CBT therapist, I explain to the client that their binge eating is based on emotional reasoning, and, although eating might make them feel temporarily comforted, would not help them feel better about themselves. In fact, overeating usually has the opposite effect and actually makes them feel worse about themselves. Together, you and I will plan a different approach to handling disappointment. With practice, you will be able to interpret people’s responses more realistically, so you are not constantly feeling inadequate. We will also work on improving your self-esteem. As your self-esteem improves, you became more able to refrain from snacking and binging and began to eat more nutritious food.

— Amy Castongia, Counselor in Huntersville, NC
 

Our relationships with food are complex and layered and often have less to do with just eating emotionally or out of hunger. *Most* eating is a combination of these two things! We may eat together in session, unpack your beliefs about food and your body, or teach you skills to pause and notice what's happening for you when emotional eating starts. I am confident that you can have a better relationship with food *and* emotions, and that they don't have to be tied together so painfully.

— Summer Forlenza, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in , CA

I have worked with many clients over my years in practice with issues related to emotional/disordered eating. Disordered eating is a metaphor for what is unspoken.Together we will look at the purpose the emotional eating serves for you and what is going on in your life that the eating may be expressing. By exploring the stressors in your life we can look at those underlying causes, give them a voice and help you work toward resolving them in a healthy manner.

— Joan Tibaldi, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Saint Augustine, FL
 

If your eating concerns stem from emotion regulation concerns, we can work together using a dialectical approach to better handle urges when strong emotions arise.

— Brandi Stalzer, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor

As a CBT therapist, I explain to the client that their binge eating is based on emotional reasoning, and, although eating might make them feel temporarily comforted, would not help them feel better about themselves. In fact, overeating usually has the opposite effect and actually makes them feel worse about themselves. Together, you and I will plan a different approach to handling disappointment. With practice, you will be able to interpret people’s responses more realistically, so you are not constantly feeling inadequate. We will also work on improving your self-esteem. As your self-esteem improves, you became more able to refrain from snacking and binging and began to eat more nutritious food.

— Amy Castongia, Counselor in Huntersville, NC
 

As a CBT therapist, I explain to the client that their binge eating is based on emotional reasoning, and, although eating might make them feel temporarily comforted, would not help them feel better about themselves. In fact, overeating usually has the opposite effect and actually makes them feel worse about themselves. Together, you and I will plan a different approach to handling disappointment. With practice, you will be able to interpret people’s responses more realistically, so you are not constantly feeling inadequate. We will also work on improving your self-esteem. As your self-esteem improves, you became more able to refrain from snacking and binging and began to eat more nutritious food.

— Amy Castongia, Counselor in Huntersville, NC

Often times if we struggle with managing our weight, we also struggle with feelings of depression, anxiety, or lower self-esteem. We often use food as a way to cope and deal with emotions that we struggle with, and we can also essentially become addicted to foods. One common method that I frequently use to help heal a relationship with food is Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (or CBT). This technique has a great deal of evidence behind it as being effective in healing our relationship with food.

— Danielle Wayne, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Boise, ID
 

As a CBT therapist, I explain to the client that their binge eating is based on emotional reasoning, and, although eating might make them feel temporarily comforted, would not help them feel better about themselves. In fact, overeating usually has the opposite effect and actually makes them feel worse about themselves. Together, you and I will plan a different approach to handling disappointment. With practice, you will be able to interpret people’s responses more realistically, so you are not constantly feeling inadequate. We will also work on improving your self-esteem. As your self-esteem improves, you became more able to refrain from snacking and binging and began to eat more nutritious food.

— Amy Castongia, Counselor in Huntersville, NC

As a CBT therapist, I explain to the client that their binge eating is based on emotional reasoning, and, although eating might make them feel temporarily comforted, would not help them feel better about themselves. In fact, overeating usually has the opposite effect and actually makes them feel worse about themselves. Together, you and I will plan a different approach to handling disappointment. With practice, you will be able to interpret people’s responses more realistically, so you are not constantly feeling inadequate. We will also work on improving your self-esteem. As your self-esteem improves, you became more able to refrain from snacking and binging and began to eat more nutritious food.

— Amy Castongia, Counselor in Huntersville, NC
 

At the core of an eating disorder is emotional eating. Whether you restrict food and/or binge eat, food becomes a way to manage your emotions. Food is tasty and satisfying and, yes, comforting. That's okay! The challenge comes when emotional eating becomes your way of coping by keeping your emotions at bay. This can lead to feeling out of control and so much worse about yourself. Learn how to feel your feelings and emotional eating will lift. Let us help teach you how! Reach out to us today.

— Food Is Not The Enemy Eating Disorder Services, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR

Food is essential for life! It's also delicious, nourishing and can serve many purposes. For a lot of us, we find comfort in food, especially when we are anxious, bored, alone and the list can go on. Sometimes , we may just find that we are always hungry! My question is, what are you hungry for, food or something else? Together, we will take a deeper look into your emotional eating and I will assist you in connecting with your body to eat in what we call a more self attuned way.

— Rebecca Brown, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in ,
 

Emotional eating is a behavior that people engage in to cope with life stress and challenging feelings. The good news is that every time you are tempted to emotionally eat, your body is signalling you that you need another kind of attention. The only problem is that, on your own, it is so hard to pause before eating and pay attention to the feelings that want to surface. I would be honored to meet you there, right at that moment to support your unfolding story.

— Anat Ben-Zvi, Ph.D., Clinical Psychologist in New York, NY

Emotional eating is a learned coping mechanism for handling difficult emotions. Together, we can find new ways of dealing with uncomfortable emotions and help you stop emotional eating.

— Janet Wang, Licensed Professional Counselor Associate in , TX
 

As a CBT therapist I explain to you that your binge eating is based on emotional reasoning, and, although eating might make you feel temporarily comforted, would not help you feel better about yourself. Overeating typically has the opposite effect and actually makes you feel worse about yourself. This would then worsen your overeating. Together, you and I will plan a different approach to handling disappointment. With practice, you will be able to interpret people’s responses more realistically, so you are not constantly feeling inadequate. Together, you and I will also work on ways to improve your self-esteem. As your self-esteem improves, you will became more able to refrain from snacking and binging and began to eat more nutritious food.

— Amy Castongia, Counselor in Huntersville, NC

As a CBT therapist, I explain to the client that their binge eating is based on emotional reasoning, and, although eating might make them feel temporarily comforted, would not help them feel better about themselves. In fact, overeating usually has the opposite effect and actually makes them feel worse about themselves. Together, you and I will plan a different approach to handling disappointment. With practice, you will be able to interpret people’s responses more realistically, so you are not constantly feeling inadequate. We will also work on improving your self-esteem. As your self-esteem improves, you became more able to refrain from snacking and binging and began to eat more nutritious food.

— Amy Castongia, Counselor in Huntersville, NC