Therapists Who Treat Other Therapists

Therapists need therapy too! While therapists are trained to provide counseling services to their clients they unfortunately can't provide the same service to themselves. Therapists experience burn out, compassion fatigue, counter transference and more while working with clients. A good therapist that want's to stay in tip top shape will receive their own counseling from a practitioner that is trained to treat their fellow colleague. Reach out to one of the qualified specialist below.

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Meet the specialists

 

I firmly believe that the best therapists do their own work. Doing our own work allows us to examine our countertransference, & embody the ideas we convey to our clients. If we embody & model these ideas, rather than just provide book knowledge, clients will have a much deeper experience. Shame about colleagues knowing we are struggling personally is a huge barrier to clinicians finding their own therapist. I'm passionate about deconstructing this stigma.

— Kirstin Carl, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Encino, CA

I firmly believe that the best therapists do their own work. Doing our own work allows us to examine our countertransference, & embody the ideas we convey to our clients. If we embody & model these ideas, rather than just provide book knowledge, clients will have a much deeper experience. Shame about colleagues knowing we are struggling personally is a huge barrier to clinicians finding their own therapist. I'm passionate about breaking through this barrier.

— Kirstin Carl, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Encino, CA
 

We have spent years helping others, studying, taking continuing education courses so we SHOULD be able to sort through our own struggles right? Nope, there is no such thing as being able to independently handle every issue we face. You walk beside clients through life’s struggles and their darkest emotions- now it is time to let me support you through yours.

— Alyssia Cruz, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in SAN DIEGO, CA

I enjoy seeing therapists as clients because they are motivated and insightful.

— SALLY RUMSEY, Licensed Professional Counselor in Hartland, VT
 

As therapists, we often come to this work by way of our own pain, sometimes our own trauma. We develop strengths in areas like listening, empathy, staying calm in crisis, and those lead us to this work. When we work from those trauma-forged strengths without healing, we run the risk of burning out. Investing in our own healing and developing deep compassion for ourselves fosters longevity and joy in our work, which manifests in richer experiences with our own patients.

— Liz Fletcher, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Oklahoma City, OK

Those of us on the front lines need someone to talk to too....and our own space to process the unique difficulties surrounding us in this time. The void we scream into is full, so I recommend that we each have our own helping professional to debrief with.

— Hannah Zimmerman, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Missoula, MT
 

Therapists need therapists just as much, perhaps more, than anyone else. Mostly focusing on therapists with anxiety, therapists who are creatives/theatre folk, queer therapists, fat therapists, therapists dealing with life transitions, therapists navigating consensual non monogamy.

— T.Lee Shostack, Clinical Social Worker

I am a seasoned therapist with 40 years in the field. I am a former agency clinical director who consulted regularly with the clinical staff. I am a long term clinical supervisor for CSWA's as well. I know intricately the challenges we therapists face in providing services in our clinical practices.... Burnout and Compassion Fatigue are at an all time high in our field. Self care is Key and having your own therapist to process with can help stem the tide of becoming overwhelmed.

— Joseph Doherty, Psychologist in Portland, OR
 

I firmly believe that the best therapists do their own work. Doing our own work allows us to examine our countertransference, & embody the ideas we convey to clients. If we embody & model these ideas, rather than just provide book knowledge, clients will have a much deeper experience. You feeling seen & heard is crucial. Shame about colleagues knowing we are struggling personally is a huge barrier to clinicians finding their own therapist. I'm passionate about breaking through this barrier.

— Kirstin Carl, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Encino, CA

Are you experiencing countertransference, feeling overwhelmed with your workload, or experiencing vicarious trauma? Maybe a colleague has seen you struggling and suggested you seek personal therapy. Maybe you are new to the field and wondering what the heck you got yourself into. (Been there!) You might be judging yourself for not being able to “figure it out.” Come! Be radically human, and let someone who intimately gets it attune to your needs.

— Serena Forward-Rodriguez, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Seattle, WA
 

Truthfully, therapists need safe spaces too. Grappling with issues like clarity/alignment within the counselor identity, secondary trauma, and burnout, I enjoy supporting therapists!

— Brittney George, Licensed Professional Counselor in , VA

I firmly believe that the best therapists do their own work. Doing our own work allows us to examine our countertransference, & embody the ideas we convey to our clients. If we embody & model these ideas, rather than just provide book knowledge, clients will have a much deeper experience. Shame about colleagues knowing we are struggling personally is a huge barrier to clinicians finding their own therapist. I'm passionate about deconstructing this stigma.

— Kirstin Carl, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Encino, CA
 

Being a therapist is hard at times. We are human and struggle at times. Being a therapist can trigger our own issues; and those need to be addressed to be the most effective therapist you can be. And to be the healthiest version of you. For you, your family, friends, and clients. I have had the privilege to work with other therapist's and help guide them through difficult times. I have been the therapist client and know what it is like. Now is the time to give yourself the care you deserve.

— Eric Strom, Clinical Social Worker in Minnetonka, MN

As a therapist, you have to take creative steps to avoid compassion fatigue, vicarious traumatization, secondary traumatic stress, and burnout. Online art therapy can maximize your creative potential for building resilience in places where words can’t go. Please visit www.meganvanmeter.com to learn how I help therapists just like you shine brightly using their very own eyes and hands and the full-body wisdom they’re connected to. Isn’t it time for you to create a better outcome for yourself?

— Megan VanMeter, Art Therapist