Political Climate

A growing number of individuals are experiencing stress and anxiety related to the current political climate. Regardless of your party or political affiliation, when current events are stressful or uncertain, especially on a large scale, it is totally normal to feel increased anxiety, fear, anger or worry. Minorities in particular may be feeling increased fear at the potential impact of the current administration. Whether it’s techniques to help you limit the time you spend online or guidance on getting involved with causes you believe in, a qualified mental health professional can help you cope with the chaos of the current political climate. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s political climate experts.

Meet the specialists

The current political climate is extremely tough to deal with, but I have learned ways to help deal with these troubled times. Let me help you too.

— Adam Saltz, Clinical Social Worker in Sudbury, MA
 

We can assist you through this challenging time via telehealth. We understand COVID-19 has brought a lot of stress and uncertainty. We have worked with many clients on challenging life transitions and we'd love to work with you too!

— Family Counseling Center, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Saint Petersburg, FL

In processing the immense emotional and psychological consequences of the climate emergency, we can turn towards the reality that we are entwined with the water, air, and land. Rather than evading fear, we can channel our dread and despair to create effective and sustainable change, transforming resignation into collective action. As we grieve for devastation, we can remain embedded in courage, retain persistence through obstacles, and build shared bravery and justice.

— Jessamyn Wesley, Licensed Professional Counselor in portland, OR
 

We can assist you through this challenging time via telehealth. We understand COVID-19 has brought a lot of stress and uncertainty. We have worked with many clients on challenging life transitions and we'd love to work with you too!

— Family Counseling Center, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Saint Petersburg, FL

While one may choose to not attend to politics, none of us exist outside of our political systems. Power distribution, institutionalized discrimination and racism, income and rights inequality affect the vast majority of us negatively in multiple ways. Together we can work toward ways to heal from those effects to empower you internally, interpersonally, culturally and politically.

— Renee Beck, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist
 

The political climate of the country is driving so much stress, anxiety, anger, and overall strong emotion. We look at the ways this is showing up in your life and interfering with the way you want to live, think, and interact with those around you. I truly believe that in this country we have more in common with each other than we do differences and we can learn so much from each other. The good in the world does outweigh the hate in the world, despite what the news may choose to emphasize.

— Laura Mueller-Anderson, Clinical Social Worker in Minneapolis, MN

"If you're not depressed/anxious, you're not paying attention." Have you heard or said this before? "You just have to learn to accept the things that you can't change." How about that? While it's true that learning to accept what we can't change is hugely important for our mental health, what's also important is not settling for circumstances that we desperately want to change without giving it a good try. We're capable of much more than we know, and discovering that is part of our healing.

— Nicholas Reynolds, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist
 

We do not exist in a vacuum since we are all part of a sociopolitical and economic world structure. Indeed, “the personal is political” – i.e. our individual struggles may be generated and intensified by sociopolitical and economic systems, as well as power struggles within our relationships. Our goal would be to bring those dynamics within the therapeutic process since they inform who we are as client and therapist, as well as highlight the path for a more inclusive healing process.

— Anny Papatheodorou, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Lafayette, CA

The current political climate has increased existential angst in many of us to a fever pitch. This can lead us to question our place in the world, our relationships with family, friends, and co-workers, and how we can stay the course without exhausting ourselves in the fight for social justice. As a social justice warrior myself, I can assist with helping you obtain a balance in standing up for your beliefs while maintaining a balance that leaves you space to enjoy your life.

— Stephanie Hurley, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Cincinnati, OH
 

You may not think therapy is a place to talk about politics. Yet it can be a great opportunity to discuss how the current political climate may be causing stress in your daily life.

— Rachel Moore, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Diego, CA

In processing the immense emotional and psychological consequences of the climate emergency, we can turn towards the reality that we are entwined with the water, air, and land. Rather than evading fear, we can channel our dread and despair to create effective and sustainable change, transforming resignation into collective action. As we grieve for devastation, we can remain embedded in courage, retain persistence through obstacles, and build shared bravery and justice.

— Jessamyn Wesley, Licensed Professional Counselor in portland, OR
 

Our current political climate is undeniably exacerbating symptoms of depression, anxiety, PTSD, and stress. I hear everyday how this is affecting people, nonetheless, I rarely see clients come in to therapy to address these issues because "it's not bad enough." Your experience around our political issues and concerns are valid, and you're welcome to process these in session with me.

— Melanie Arroyo Pérez, Licensed Professional Counselor in Olathe, KS