Drug Dependence / Abuse / Addiction

Drug addiction, dependence or abuse, sometimes called substance use disorder, is a disease. It affects an individual's brain and behavior, making it so they are unable to control their use of the drug in question. Symptoms of drug dependence include needing more of the drug to get the same effect over time, intense urges for the drug to the point of not being able to concentrate on anything else, spending money that you can't afford on the drug, not fulfilling obligations (work, familial or social) because of drug use, and/or failing in attempts to stop or reduce use of the drug. If you are worried that a loved one may be struggling with drug abuse, some possible indicators include a drop in school or work performance or attendance, a lack of interest in their appearance, increased secretiveness, and/or sudden requests for money. A qualified professional therapist will be able to identify and diagnose drug issues, provide harm reduction support, work with you to create a treatment plan and help you stick to it. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s drug dependence, abuse and addiction specialists for help today.

Meet the specialists

Trauma informed care, Integrative, CBT, Motivational Interviewing, including a multicultural approach to recovery

— Wendy Howell, Licensed Professional Counselor in Glendale, AZ
 

Addiction is a disease and healing is possible. I support individuals to develop a plan to achieve abstinence and sobriety, to manage emotional and physical health, and to prevent further self-medication and relapse. For five years I worked at a drug treatment center, primarily with opiate addiction where I helped individuals find their unique path to recovery. I provide a comfortable, non-judgmental setting to help you overcome your dependence on substances and addictive behaviors.

— Deborah Robinson-Thompson, Mental Health Counselor in Woburn, MA

I work with clients struggling with a variety of substance use disorders. I have worked in the field of addiction at all levels of care from outpatient to residential treatment.

— Morgan Goulet, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA
 

I completed my postdoctoral fellowship at American Addiction Centers in West Palm Beach, Florida. With comprehensive training in conducting psychological and psychoeducational evaluations for individuals across the lifespan, I have and continue to provide short- and long-term psychotherapy for culturally diverse adults and individuals with substance use and co-occurring disorders.

— Dr. Lindsay Howard, Clinical Psychologist in Parkland, FL

Julie is a certified International Advanced Alcohol and Drug Counselor. She understands that addiction is a disease and is passionate about educating clients and their families on the disease concept of addiction. Julie strives to help her clients see themselves separate from their disease. She understands and educates about triggers, relapse prevention, and the struggles of abuse, addiction, and recovery.

— Julie Dunn, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Naperville, IL
 

Addiction is a democratic disease and does not discriminate who it impacts. Addiction is traumatic and complicated both for the person using and for family members and loved ones. As a therapist I view addiction as being symptomatic of other issues impacting a client’s life. Addiction and recovery is often a nonlinear path and looks different for each person. As a therapist I do not see one “right way” to move to recovery but rather help clients find the path that fits them.

— Dan Schmitt, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist Intern in Eugene, OR

I am very familiar with 12 step as well as other modalities for treating addiction. I also have worked in treatment previously and have helped various individuals achieve sobriety

— Eric Katende, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA

Over 30 years providing in-patient/out-patient treatment/program development and evaluation.

— PATRICIA WALLACE, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in BEVERYLY HILLS, CA
 

I am specializing in addictions through my master's program at Lewis & Clark. I do not think 12-step is for everyone, nor do I think abstinence is for everyone. My goal is to look at what your goals are and help you understand the barriers in achieving them.

— Jules Allison, Counselor in Portland, OR

As a Certified Chemical Dependency Counselor, I have worked with clients in new recovery and who have relapsed, family members with Alanon and coda issues, teens with parents who are using and may be incarcerated, and support sobriety and abstinence in recovery with 12 step support.

— SC (Stacy-Colleen) Nameth, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Los Angeles, CA
 

The Desensitization of Triggers and Urge Reprocessing (DeTUR) method is an urge reduction protocol for the treatment of a wide range of chemical addictions and dysfunctional behaviors. The purpose of the DeTUR protocol is to uncover core traumas and reprocess them. In achieving reprocessing, the triggers no longer stimulate the need to use or act out. The new response becomes the positive treatment goal of coping, and functioning successfully in life as determined by the client.

— William Portis, Licensed Professional Counselor in Bloomington, IL

Loss of control, surrender of the will to a craving doesn’t have to lead to prolonged suffering. I help renew a sense of “self”. Purpose.

— Sergio Hernández, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Chicago, IL
 

I am a certified alcohol and other drug counselor (CADC). I believe in a holistic and individualized approach to treating addiction. I am a certified Yoga of 12-Step Recovery (Y12SR) Leader.

— Traci Patterson, Therapist in Chicago, IL

I am a Texas Licensed Chemical Dependency Counselor who has worked extensively with adolescents and adults seeking and in recovery from addictive behaviors. I use existential narrative therapy to help people to tell, retell, and reframe their stories to empower them in grappling with the lifelong existential questions of (1) Who am I? (2) Where do I belong in the world? and (3) What are my meaning and purpose? These questions are umbrellas under which many of our human struggles are nestled.

— Dr. E. Rose Sierra, Psychotherapist in Wichita Falls, TX
 

Since 2012, I have worked within the field of addictions recovery. It’s my experience that those struggling with addiction - whether it’s to food, sex, alcohol, drugs or even work - all seek to escape, in one form or another, from pain, as addiction often correlates with trauma. It’s my goal to support those battling addictive behaviors to develop healthy coping mechanisms for difficult emotions, process underlying trauma, and reclaim joy.

— Monroe Spivey, Therapist in Asheville, NC

Not everyone is open to full abstinence and the 12-Step modality; which is why I work from both a total abstinence modality and harm-reduction. Over the years, I realized that when treating addiction, it is important to consider the client’s prospective on how to approach their addiction, and to allow the client to decide what is the best course of treatment for them. This will assist the client to feel empowered and have a choice, and options, in their recovery.

— Filippo M. Forni, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA
 

I have been a substance abuse counselor since I was a graduate student intern. I currently conduct substance abuse groups.

— Alisha Massey, Licensed Professional Counselor in Baton Rouge, LA

Addiction is a disease and healing is possible. I support individuals to develop a plan to achieve abstinence and sobriety, to manage emotional and physical health, and to prevent further self-medication and relapse. For five years I worked at a drug treatment center, primarily with opiate addiction where I helped individuals find their unique path to recovery. I provide a comfortable, non-judgmental setting to help you overcome your dependence on substances and addictive behaviors.

— Deborah Robinson-Thompson, Mental Health Counselor in Woburn, MA