Coparenting

Raising children can be hard, even in the best of circumstances. When you are facing conflicts with other primary caregivers, the challenge is exponentially greater. Co-parenting refers to the ways that caregivers work together (regardless of if they are together or separated) in their roles as parents. Developing techniques, guidelines, and methods to raise a child is not just about the child – it can be beneficial to work with a qualified therapist to determine your unique parenting approaches, as well as how to improve communications. Successful co-parenting requires that caregivers accept that things will change, from the children's developmental issues and milestones, to careers, to the possibility of new relationships and partners. Each situation is inherently unique, and there can be many different dynamics at play (for example, step-parents will likely bring their own parenting styles). If you think you may benefit from some co-parenting support, reach out to one of TherapyDen’s experts today.

Meet the specialists

Separated couples with children can develop healthy co-parenting "rules of the road" with coparenting counseling, where we seek to minimize the negative effects of separation on your child/children by improving the communication and cooperation between you and your ex. We establish goals—often your child/children's wellbeing—and work steadily toward them. We incorporate Nonviolent Communication and forgiveness and repair practices to help create a more positive and collaborative space for you and your ex.

— Julia Ward, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco, CA
 

I help parents get on the same page in order to create a more consistent, supportive environment for their children. Whether parents are married, separated, or divorced I work with parents to set expectations, work through differences in a constructive way away from their children, not using children as a "go-between", and to resolve conflicts in a productive, peaceful way.

— Kaleigh Boysen, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Portland, OR

I help parents who are not romantically partnered work through differences of parenting philosophy, helping you find common ground. This work is very present-focused and pragmatic. We may look at communication patterns and assumptions each person may bring to their parenting and think about ways to work together for the common cause of child-rearing.

— Jennifer Trinkle, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Berkeley, CA

Whether you are married, partnered, live together, live with your children, or not, if you share a child with someone, coparenting is an issue. Those relationships can be challenging when you don't see eye-to-eye.

— Ali Dubin, Mental Health Counselor in North Hollywood, CA
 

Whether you are married, partnered, live together, live with your children, or not, if you share a child with someone, coparenting is an issue. Those relationships can be challenging when you don't see eye-to-eye.

— Ali Dubin, Mental Health Counselor in North Hollywood, CA

Coparenting is a unique form of therapy that will take you past the hurt and pain of the divorce, and if the divorce was amicable CoParenting will take you to the next phase of your process. CoParenting is not about mom or dad, but about the children that you share and are responsible for. I work under the premise that “the kid(s) are my client”- I will never (likely) meet your kids but I will diligently work towards having each parent meet their needs. Together we negotiate and create CoParenting plans that include logistical issues, such as shared custody and extracurricular activities, as well as learning new skills to parent and nurture your children as a CoParent.

— Veronika Noble, Marriage & Family Therapist in Carlsbad, CA
 

I also work with couples who are beyond the point of wanting to stay together but need help managing their coparenting relationship.

— Raffi Bilek, Counselor in Baltimore, MD