Coparenting

Raising children can be hard, even in the best of circumstances. When you are facing conflicts with other primary caregivers, the challenge is exponentially greater. Co-parenting refers to the ways that caregivers work together (regardless of if they are together or separated) in their roles as parents. Developing techniques, guidelines, and methods to raise a child is not just about the child – it can be beneficial to work with a qualified therapist to determine your unique parenting approaches, as well as how to improve communications. Successful co-parenting requires that caregivers accept that things will change, from the children's developmental issues and milestones, to careers, to the possibility of new relationships and partners. Each situation is inherently unique, and there can be many different dynamics at play (for example, step-parents will likely bring their own parenting styles). If you think you may benefit from some co-parenting support, reach out to one of TherapyDen’s experts today.

Meet the specialists

Whether you are married, partnered, live together, live with your children, or not, if you share a child with someone, coparenting is an issue. Those relationships can be challenging when you don't see eye-to-eye.

— Dr. Ali Dubin, Counselor in North Hollywood, CA
 

Whether you are married, partnered, live together, live with your children, or not, if you share a child with someone, coparenting is an issue. Those relationships can be challenging when you don't see eye-to-eye.

— Dr. Ali Dubin, Counselor in North Hollywood, CA

Helping parents married or divorced coparent.

— Elaine Oliver, Licensed Professional Counselor in Fulton, MD
 

Co-parenting is hard, when one parent does not feel like they are being heard, or respected. There is one thing that both parents can both agree on, and that is the mutual love for their child. The overall goal is to create co-operation in the relationship dynamics of co-parenting.

— Kenya Pace, Registered Mental Health Counselor Intern in Tampa, FL

Navigating life after a family has split up or raising children with a new partner can be complex, difficult and frustrating. Cooperation and communication are vital and may seem impossible. I help individuals and family find a balance between parental autonomy and coordination the parenting job with others.

— Jennie Schottmiller, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in , PA
 

Coparenting is a unique form of therapy that will take you past the hurt and pain of the divorce, and if the divorce was amicable CoParenting will take you to the next phase of your process. CoParenting is not about mom or dad, but about the children that you share and are responsible for. I work under the premise that “the kid(s) are my client”- I will never (likely) meet your kids but I will diligently work towards having each parent meet their needs. Together we negotiate and create CoParenting plans that include logistical issues, such as shared custody and extracurricular activities, as well as learning new skills to parent and nurture your children as a CoParent.

— Veronika Noble, Marriage & Family Therapist in Carlsbad, CA

Are you co-parenting with someone you're no longer romantically involved with? Have you noticed yourself struggling physically, emotionally, or spiritually due to the stresses co-parenting? Learn how to adapt and change through each new season of co-parenting.

— Kristen Adams, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Georgetown, TX
 

Are you co-parenting with someone you're no longer romantically involved with? Have you noticed yourself struggling physically, emotionally, or spiritually due to the stresses co-parenting? Learn how to adapt and change through each new season of co-parenting.

— Kristen Adams, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Georgetown, TX

Coparenting can be seen as a hard topic but, it does not have to be. Working with me as your therapist. Both parents will have a safe space to share, express and workout challenging topics such as splitting time, living arrangements, educational needs, holidays, vacations and who does what in case of an emergency. Also, I provide mediation to see if an arrangement can be made cordially before everything gets ugly and ends up in court. If there is a court order in place already, I can assist

— Rosemary Powell, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Queens, NY
 

I also work with couples who are beyond the point of wanting to stay together but need help managing their coparenting relationship.

— Raffi Bilek, Counselor in Baltimore, MD

Calvary Counseling Center offers H.O.P.E. (Healthy & Objective Parenting Education), a state approved parent education class.

— Janice Chambers, Licensed Professional Counselor in Manassas, VA
 

Being part of a blended family myself, I have a passion and unique understanding of what you are going through. Relationships that include exes and stepchildren have unique and complex challenges. I can help you learn to navigate the delicate balance of healthy cooperation with your ex, while establishing appropriate boundaries that honor and protect your current relationship.

— Debby Deroian, Licensed Professional Counselor in Red Bank, NJ

Navigating life after a family has split up or raising children with a new partner can be complex, difficult and frustrating. Cooperation and communication are vital and may seem impossible. I help individuals and family find a balance between parental autonomy and coordination the parenting job with others.

— Jennie Schottmiller, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in , PA
 

Being part of a blended family myself, I have a passion and unique understanding of what you are going through. Relationships that include exes and stepchildren have unique and complex challenges. I can help you learn to navigate the delicate balance of healthy cooperation with your ex, while establishing appropriate boundaries that honor and protect your current relationship.

— Debby Deroian, Licensed Professional Counselor in Red Bank, NJ

Whether you are married, partnered, live together, live with your children, or not, if you share a child with someone, coparenting is an issue. Those relationships can be challenging when you don't see eye-to-eye.

— Dr. Ali Dubin, Counselor in North Hollywood, CA